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Full text of "Maryland Alumni News"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marylandalumnine13univ 




JUNE 1941 



ALUMNI 
NEWS 







Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JUNE, 1941 



Number 1 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 

OFFICERS FOR 1941 -42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Mel. 

Robi i; i M. Watkins, '23. First Vice-President Calvert HilK. Mil. 

\i btin C. Diggs, '21. Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

Ci. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park. Md. 

ALUMNI HOARD 

{Note — The officers named above are also members ol the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Konss. '29, Chairman 

Edwin Si mi.lr, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromlly, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Sum \s, '28; J. C. Longridce, '29 Education 

J. M. Lescure, '23: K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Ti mple, '31 Home Economics 

Ei wood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

()m\k Crothi ks, [r., '29; C. \ - . Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . . Women's Representatives 
P. \V. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 
Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park. Md.. as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 



GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. '21. Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawnev, '31. President. 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond. 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George \V. Clendaniel, '20, President: Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 

Treasurer; Mrs. George VY. Clendaniel. '21. Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews. Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air. Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary, Frederick. Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YOKE CITY: Mr. James E. Dingtnan, '21. President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25. 

Secretary, 310 Last 44th Street. New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt. '06, President. 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. T.; J. P. 

Mudd. 'n;. Secretary, 174 Manheim Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON. I). C : J. Douglas Wall., p. '19. President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

\ . kin, its. '."), Secretary, 410 Fourth Street N.E.. Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Ilcm> Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '2i, Secretary. Hagerstown, Md, 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hemic. '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 

rctary. Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 
James W Stevens, '19 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

M. B. Stevens, '27 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 '.....Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



A, K Mi si | ^ . '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basket Ball 

Stewari McCaw, '35 Boxing 

K. E. Pow mi. ' i ; Lacrosse 

Ueain Eppley, '18 Track 

L E. Bopst, '16 Tennis 

I'm Kehoe, '40 doss Countrj 



Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Football 

I)k. E. B, Friedenwai i>. '03 1 

M. M. Clark, '22 

Dk. a. w . Valentine, '04 At Large 

James M. Su.hi/ '19 

II. R, Devilbliss, 'l 1 

E. !■'. Zalsak, '25 



COVER PICTURE 

ISS ELMIRE PEARSON 
was chosen "Miss Mary- 
land" for the 1941 Terrapin, student 
vearbook. Miss Pearson is a Maryland 
product coming from Chevy Chase. 
She is a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma and enrolled in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Her picture 
speaks for her which needs no lauda- 
tor}' words as to character and per- 
sonality. "Miss Maryland" was cho- 
sen by A. Vargas, well-known artist 
for Esquire. Other coeds in "Miss 
Maryland's" court were Miss Be\er- 
lv Smith, sophomore, from Nutlcv. 
N. J.; Miss Helen Crane, junior, of 
College Heights; Miss Marjorie 
Brock, sophomore, of Calvert Hills; 
Miss Mary Yeager, sophomore, from 
Hagerstown, Md., and Miss Earla 
Marshall, senior, from Hvattsvillc, 
Md. 

FELLOW ALUMNI: 

(<r^ INCE time inevitably goes on 
2^ and changes take place in the 
world in general, so at the meeting 
of the Alumni Association on Alum- 
ni Day, June 6, 1941, our good friend 
and eminently successful President. 
Pete Chichester, relinquished his 
office and it has fallen to my lot to 
attempt to carry on his good work. 

lie has left an Association which 
is larger, closer cemented in its ideas 
and with a smoother working organ- 
ization than ever before in its li is 
tory. Good work, hard work and 
work well done has marked Pete's 
tenure of office. 

In the year to come it will be my 
aim to continue the smooth running 
of the Association and. if possible, 
leave it in as good condition, if 1 
cannot improve it. than when 
took over. To continue a successful 

(Continued on Page 10) 



JUNE — 1941 



Many. Old Qtadk 
an <JtandjpA, 49tn Reunion 

Portrait Of The kite Willard M. HillegetSt Presented 
Woolford, \S7, On Hand — Parker. '05, Elected President 



IjTjailANKS to the Weather Man. we 
l^ delightful Alumni Day. All week ll 
hut on Thursday night, June ^th, it stopped 
off for Alumni Day and Commencement 
shows that everybody must he living right 
Park. 

Alumni from the classes of 1880 to 1941 
campus for the 49th Annual Reunion. Dr. 
fith, '80, was the oldest Alumnus present. 
Woolford, '87, was second in age. Dr. II. 
nell. '88, third and Dr. Fletcher P. Veitch, 
of the Fiftieth Reunion Class, carried top 
classes. 

Festivities began in earnest when Dr. \ 
the aid of his son, F. P. Veitch, Jr., '35, 
pamed by Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, and P. W. 
'20, Association President, raised the class 
honor class of the day. A good assemblage 
were on hand for the ceremony. 



had a most 

had rained 

and cleared 

Day. Tins 

at College 

dotted the 

R. S. Grif- 

Mr. Cator 

B. McDon- 

91. leader 
honors for 

'eitch, with 

and accom- 

Chiehcster, 

flag as the 

of Alumni 



Luncheon 

Following the flag-raising the old grads packed the 
Dining Flail for the annual luncheon at 1 2 . 30 P. M. 
with President P. W. Chichester presiding. At this time 
honor was paid a deceased graduate who had given gen- 
erously of his time in the services of his Alma Mater, 
the late Willard M. Hillegeist, '12. Prof. Charles S. 
Richardson, retired head of the Public Speaking De- 
partment presented a portrait in oil of Willard Hille- 
geist to the University on behalf of James W. Stevens 
and James Swartz, both of the class of 1919. 

"Most of you here knew Mr. Willard Hillegeist," 
spoke Professor Richardson. '"Some of you knew him 
intimately and those who knew him intimately will 
agree with me in saying that he was one of the most 
faithful servants that the University of Maryland has 
ever had and when he passed away it could have been 
truly said of him, AVell done, thou good and faithful 
servant.' He was honest, he was energetic, he was always 
governed by a sense of duty and he was unusually capa- 
ble and able in the performance of his official duties. 
Jimmie Stevens and Jimmic Swartz knew 'Hillie' well 
and if they had no other reason for selecting him as the 
subject of this portrait that would suffice, hut there is 
another reason. Ths greatest part of this man who has 




Dr. A. A. Parker, *05 



Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, 
\t.D 

/in/ .>/ the Alumni 
, iation at thr annual 
meeting. He is a pionn 
neni resident of the East 
ern \h<>tr and outstand 
ing physician. His int 
in the University has been 
iii.icii.vuii/ ever since the 
mst day he became a stu- 
dent. The '('(. Reveille stu- 
dent year book, punts. 
"Parker us a rooter is bet 
try than any ten nun." 

Dr. Parker has previ- 
ously served on the Alum- 
ni Hoard and is a past 
President of th,- "At" Club. His athletic prowess was manager of ' 
and he -r.is a baseball player of importance. 

passed away was his spiritual self, lie was kind, under 
standing, sympathetic, gning all that he had to his bus- 
iness and to his friends. ... I want to mention one qu il 
ity that Willard had that 1 wish more people of the 
world possessed. He was always cheerful and even in 
the midst of physical pain he had a pleasant smile and a 
jolly word for any friend he might chance to meet.'' 

Dr. II. J. Patterson, retired director of the Experiment 
Station and Willard Ilillegeist's first University em- 
ployer accepted the portrait in behalf of the University. 
Mrs. Stevens unveiled the portrait as Mrs. Hillegeist 
and Willard's brother, Charles F. Hillegeist, looked on. 

Excerpts from the remarks of Dr. Patterson: 

"In accepting on behalf of the University of Mary 
land this fine photograph of Willard M. Hillegeist. 1 
know I voice the sentiments and grateful appreciation 
of all present as well as persons who had the good for- 
tune to know Mr. Hillegeist." 

"This portrait is fine and about as real and life-like as 
the artist's brush can produce. To mam of us it is not 
necessary to have a brush to make us remember and re- 
call his fine appearance, his outstanding personality, 
character, and qualities. These have been so indelibly 
impressed upon us that he lives with us continuously, 
and will live in our memory and hearts for all times. . . . 

"On behalf of the University, the Alumni, and the 
friends, I want to convey to Jimmy Stevens and Jimmy 
Swartz of the class of 1919 our grateful and sincere ap- 
preciation of their noble act and purpose in presenting 
to the University this fine portrait of Willard \1 

Hillegeist." „ ,.„ ,, , 

° Cator Woolford 

From Atlanta, Ga.. Mr. R. Cator Woolford. a nicin 

(Continued on Page 9) 






MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



DR. SKINNER 

For a quarter of a century Dr. W. W. Skinner. '95, has 
served well his Alma Mater. In 1916, when the Man- 
land Agricultural College became the Maryland State 
College and an institution under full State superyision. 
Dr. Skinner was appointed by the late Albert C. Ritchie, 
then Goyernor of Mankind, to the Board of Regents. 
He was shortly to be appointed Secretary of the Board, 
a position he fulfilled for 18 years. In 1935, following 
the resignation of Mr. George M. Shriyer, then Chair- 
man of the Board, Dr. Skinner was elected to that office, 
in which he served until his resignation. 

Dr. Skinner is a graduate in chemistry and at the 
present is with the United States Department of Agri- 
culture as Associate Chief of Agricultural Chemistry 
and Engineering. His duties in this department have 
carried him to South America, the West Indies, Europe 
and to practically every State in the Union. 

Football 

Reviewing his college days, Dr. Skinner was a pio- 
neer in the development of football at College Park. 
He was quarterback on the first team to play and es- 
tablish the beginning of a long record of outstanding 
collegiate football history. That was in 1892 and Dr. 
Skinner was more familiarly known by his teammates 
as "Sal" Skinner. His interest in Old Line athletics has 
never waned because he will gleefully reminisce about 
the early episodes as well as recall the outstanding ac- 
complishments of the teams for the past fortv-nine 
years. Next year his team will be celebrating the first 
50th anniversary reunion of a football team at College 
Park. 

Dr. Skinner, the Alumni gratefully appreciates the 
generous service you have rendered our Alma Mater for 
these mam years. Your endeavor in behalf of the Uni- 
versity is a shining example for your fellow Alumni. Your 
interest in the activities of the Alumni Association and 
assistance you have given has been far more valuable 
than anyone can conjecture. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association the News takes 
this occasion to thank you and extend our most sincere 
wishes for your health and happiness. 



Mr. Holzapfel, Chairman 

Our eminent Alumnus, the Honorable Henry Holz- 
apfel, Jr., '93, has been elected Chairman of the Board 
of Regents to succeed Dr. W. W. Skinner, '93, who 
recently resigned. Mr. Holzapfel was originally ap- 



pointed to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland Ag- 
ricultural College in April. 1912. which became the 
Board of Regents of the University when the consolida- 
tion of the Maryland State College and the University 
of Maryland in Baltimore took place in 1920. 

Mr. Holzapfel is a prominent business man of West- 
ern Maryland and vice-president of the Potomac Edison 
Company. He is a past president of the Alumni Associa- 
tion and has always taken an active interest in Alumni 
affairs. Three sons are also graduates of the University: 
Henry III, '29, LL.B. '32; William McClave, '29, now 
a Delegate in the State Legislature, and Norman McC, 
'41, a graduate of the College of Commerce. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association the News ex- 
tends congratulations and best wishes for a most suc- 
cessful administration to Mr. Holzapfel. 



NEW REGENT 

As prescribed by law, on June 2, Mr. Phillip C. Tur- 
ner, a prominent agricultural leader in the State, was 
appointed by Governor Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, to 
succeed Mr. H. H. 
Nuttle, '05, whose 
term expired this 
year as a member 
of the Board of 
Regents. 

Mr. Turner is a 
resident of Balti- 
more County, the 
president of the 
Maryland Farm 
Bureau Federation 
and chairman of 
the State Fair 
Board. He is a 
leading dairyman 
and crop produc- 
er. In 1939 the 
University confer- 
red upon him a 

Certificate phillip c Turner 

of Merit for his outstanding contributions to agri- 
culture in the State. 

Mr. H. H. Nuttle, '05, retiring member, is a promi- 
nent canner and agriculture leader of the Eastern Shore. 
His son Byron H. was a freshman last vcar in the College 
of Agriculture. To Mr. Nuttle the Alumni Association 
wishes to express thanks for the splendid services ren- 
dered as a member of the Board of Regents. 




JUNE — 1941 

134th Commencement 

More Than 800 Received Degrees — 
Gov. O'Conor, '20, LL.B., Was Present 

Every scat taken and more desired was the situation 
at the one hundred and thirty-fourth Commencement 
Exercises held in the Ritchie Coliseum, Saturday, June 
seventh. Eight hundred and fifty receivers of degrees 
heard the Hon. Paul V. McNutt deliver an oratorical 
Commencement address. 

His Excellency. Herbert R. O'Conor. "20. LL.B., C \o\ 
crnor of Maryland, accompanied by President Byrd, 'OS. 
led the procession of dignitaries, regents and facultj . 
Governor O'Conor made brief but comprehensive re- 
marks to those seniors who were about to become fellow 
Alumni. 

Honorary degrees were conferred upon Mr. McNutt. 
Mr. Howard Bruce, prominent public citizen of Balti- 
more, Dr. George E. Bennett, prominent physician of 
Baltimore and Dr. Henry A. Brown Dunning, well- 
known pharmacist of Baltimore. They received the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Science. 

Honorary certificates in Agriculture were awarded Mr. 
Levin Otis Corkran of Caroline County, Mr. Clay Pen- 
nington Whiteford, '05, of Harford County and Mr. 
Daniel Ewing Wight of Frederick County. 

These certificates are awarded each year by the Uni- 
versity to those men who have contributed the most 
for the progress of Agriculture in the state. 

More than eight hundred and fifty seniors from the 
undergraduate colleges at College Park and the profes- 
sional schools in Baltimore received their diplomas. 




Mrs. Whitehurst, Member of the Board of Regents, Joins in Singing 

the National Anthem Following Her Induction into Office as President 

of the General Federation of Women's Clnh\ 




CLASS 

OFFICERS 

OF 

1941 



Left to Right: 



Dave Johnson, 
Vice-President 

Elizabeth Powers, 
Secretary 

Bob Rice, 
President 

Alice Burkins, 
Historian 

Jack Mueller. 
Trt asurer 



MILITARY 
AT MARYLAND 

II I I \KV history at the College Park schools of 
the University began more than seventy-five 
years ago. It was in 1887 when a cadet company won 
national recognition bv winning second honors in 
the National Encampment and Drill held in Washing- 
ton, D. C. which attracted crack drill companies from 
the entire nation. Several years later our cadets were in 
the national limelight at the St. Louis World's Fair. 




Cadet Leaders 

Maryland graduates have made noteworthy contribu- 
tions to their country in military service. In the World 
War No. 1 many graduates answered the call and dis- 
tinguished themselves in the line of dutv. Now among 
the high-ranking officers of the Army, Navy and Marine 
Corps you can find Maryland graduates carrying the 
banner of service. 

In the early years the college was entirely a military- 
conducted institution. In 1920 when the College Park 
school became a part of the University of Maryland, the 
R. O. T. C. became the new military organization. This 
requires but two hours of drill a week with one class 
period. No reveille and no taps. 

In 192>, under the new set-up, the R. O. T. C. re- 
ceived an excellent rating, a standard it has maintained 
ever since. 

At the termination of each year Reserve Officers' 
Commission as second lieutenant are awarded to those 
seniors who have successfully completed the advanced 
course. For the past eight years several of Maryland's 
honor graduates in military have been awarded regular 
commissions in the Army and Marine Corps. Today 
Maryland graduates holding reserve commissions are 
being called to active duty in the National Defense Pro- 




Col. Robert E. Wysor 
Acting Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

gram. Of the 68 graduates receiving reserve commissions 
this year 40 were ordered to active duty by Jnlv first. The 
remainder will be called as soon as they reach 21. 

For the information of Alumni your University pre- 
pares students to become officers when called to active 
duty. Here are a few of the many phases of. instruction 
given: Military courtesy, command and leadership, mili- 
tary hygiene and first aid, marksmanship, scouting and 
patroling, musketry, small arms, machine gun, automatic 
rifle, trench mortars, tank and combat leadership. The 
R. O. T. C. in College Park is primarily infantry 
training. 

The instructional staff has been enlarged to care for 
the increased enrollment which now has more than 1200 
boys in the regiment. 

No better corps of instructors and no better course in 

Social Life 





Armored Tanks 
Military Science and Tactics will be found in another 
State University. Acting Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics at Maryland is Licnt.-Col. Robert E. W'vsor, 
Jr., a graduate of Virginia Military Institute in 1913. 
He entered the Army in 191" and saw action in the 
World War with the Army of Occupation. I lis staff 
has eight additional officers and four non-commissioned 
officers. Among the officers five former Man landers arc 
on duty here. They are Lieut. Robert Beall, '36, Lieut. 
R. W. Jones. '38. Lieut. Harold L. Kelly, '37, Lieut. 
Edward Ouinn, '33, and Lieut. Ralph Williams, '33. 

Fellow Alumni, today the same as for main years 
past the University of Maryland is offering a splendid 
opportunity to the youth of our State. In this great 
hour of National Defense the youth can prepare them- 
selves for duty as citizens and as soldiers to become lead- 
ers in this great army of progress at your University. 

For more information regarding this military program 
write your Alumni Office. 

Cleaning Rifles 




Reserve Commission Awarded 

A special ceremonj foi tin awarding "t Reserve ( )ffi 
cers' Commissions to senior members of th< R <> I ( 
was held in fronl ol the I .ibrarj neai tin fl jvith 

Col. Robert E. Wysor, acting P M I ind S at the 
University, presiding. Dr. H. C Byrd spoke to the sen 
adets prior to receiving theii Reserve Office c om 
missions. Fortj oi the nun received orders to n 
for active duh by July first. The others as soon .is the) 
become twcnt\ one. Quite a la ithering attended 

tin exercises. 

Following the awarding ol commissions special r< 
treat ceremonies were held at the Hag pole as the final 
gesture of those seniors who had completed their mill- 
tan training at Maryland. The band was on hand atid 
the retreat ceremony was quite impressive. 



DR. T. H. TALIAFERRO RETIRES 

Probably few men have a warmer feeling in their 
heart for the University than Dr. Thomas 1 larch Talia 
fcrro, retiring Dean of the Faculty. He leaves the Uni- 
versity after nearly two score years of service with an 
enviable record of accomplishments as teacher, dean 
and administrator. Perhaps no other man in the Uni- 
versity has exerted such forceful influence on his stu- 
dents as has "Doc. Tolly." 

Dr. Taliaferro is a graduate of the West Point of the 
South, Virginia Military Institute, in the class of 1 890. 
He immediately began his enviable career as a teacher 
at V. M. 1. Soon his services were sought by the Uni- 
versity of Florida where he served until 1904 when he 
came to Maryland as a teacher of mathematics. His in- 
fluence, knowledge and wisdom were soon recognized 
and he was destined to become one of the leading figures 
in the University faculty. He has given generously of his 
services as head of the Department of Mathematics. 
Dean of Lnginecring, Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences and Dean of the Faculty. 

As a gesture to this sterling character, scholar and 
teacher the faculty tendered Dr. and Mrs. Taliaferro 
a reception at the Rossborough Inn on Tuesday. May 
2". last. At this time a handsome memento as a token 
of esteem for two eminent characters was presented. 
Preceding the reception Dr. IT C. Byrd, 'OS. a former 
pupil of Dr. Taliaferro, gave a buffet supper at his home 
in honor of Dr. and Mrs. 'Taliaferro. 

Dr. and Mrs. 'Taliaferro, the Alumni have always felt 
it a great honor to have your association and even 
though "Doc. Tolly" has retired from active service, feel 
assured that we consider you both one of us. 1 he best 
of wishes for your health and happiness. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Bob Smith Gets Chief Award As 68 Varsity Athletes 
Are Honored At An Assembly 



Sixty-eight Maryland athletes who participated in 
spring sports were awarded letters and other honors at 
an assembly just before school closed. It strictly was an 
informal "home" party, with the ceremonies taking place 
in the Women's Field House and dancing following. 

Robert Herman (Bob) Smith, baseball pitcher and 
football center, was accorded the highest honor, receiv- 
ing the Silvester watch, offered by the class of 1908 for 
the man who typifies the best in college athletics. 

Fields Receives Ring 

Tommy Fields, track star, was awarded the Charles 
L. Linhardt ring for the Maryland man outstanding for 
the year in athletics; John L. (Jack) Mueller received 
the E. E. Powell award for the player who rendered the 
greatest service to lacrosse during the season, and Wil- 
liam S. England won the Louis (Bozey) Berger trophy 
as the outstanding senior in baseball. 

Smith is from Woodlynnc, N. J.; Fields from Hyatts- 
ville, Md.; Mueller from Baltimore, and England from 
Washington, D. C. 

Only 26 of the 68 will be lost by graduation, but 
among them are some exceptional athletes, including 
Fields, Mueller, Joe Murphy of football and track fame, 
Gene Ochsenreiter, trackman and basketer, Phil Bur- 
kom of the tennis team, and many others. Smith is 
through as a footballer, but has another year as a pitcher. 

Lacrosse is the hardest hit, losing five regulars and a 
leading reserve. 

Eigthy-three freshmen also got numerals in the va- 
rious spring pastimes, 30 in lacrosse, 19 in baseball, 15 in 
track, 10 in tennis and nine in rifle. 

Honor Richly Deserved 

A moral echo may come from every tick of the glit- 
tering watch that Smith received. It reached the right 
party for Smith's courage, zeal and cheerfulness stood 
out like a beacon in a vear that found Maryland s ath- 
letic success far below normal. 

Smith veritably held the line together in football by 
his stellar work at center, although prematurely counted 
out because of a knee injury that threatened to termi- 
nate his career, and then helped rally a wavering dia- 
mond squad by some surprisingly good pitching. 

His selection as the honor man of the class of ath- 
letes for '41 was the most popular Old Line officials 
could have made and must have been particularly grat- 



ifving to Bob who, after stories appeared that he was 
through because of his game leg, vowed he'd plav foot- 
ball if he had to hobble on crutches. 

Those To Get Awards 

Varsity letters were awarded as follows: 

BASEBALL — Daniel Boothe. Kenneth Bransdorf, Charles 
Chance, Carl Cline, Mearle DuVall, Frank Dwyer, William Eng- 
land, Bill Fulton, Ashton Garrett, Max Hunt, Frederick Maisel. 
Leib McDonald, Dick MeHale, Bob Smith, Roscoe YVhipp, Jim 
Wharton, Arthur Woodward, Paul Jarboe, manager, and Rav 
Worthington, freshman manager. 

Chance, Dwyer, England, Maisel and Cline will be lost. 

LACROSSE — Charles Allen. Joe Coster, Bob Fetters, Jim 
Forbes, John Garrett, Bill Graham. Ray Grelecki, Frederick Hill, 
Howard Keller, Jack Mueller, Jordan Sexton, Al Slesinger, Milt 
vanden Berg, Fred Widener and Donald Murphy, manager. 

Allen, Garrett, Graham, Mueller, Sexton and Widener will be 
lost. 

TRACK — Luther Conrad, Louis Chacos, Robert Condon, 
Randall Cronin, Thomas Devlin, Thomas Fields, John Gilmore, 
Melvin Leonberger, Vernon Miller, Joe Murphy, Gene Ochsen- 
reiter, Bob Porter, John Prinz, Henry Rockstroh, Dick Shaffer, 
Willis Smith, Bill Tilley, Daniel Harwood, manager, and Wil- 
liam Brendle, freshman manager. 

Condon, Fields, Miller. Murphy, Ochsenreiter and Shaffer 
will be lost. 

TENNIS — Elwood Bates, H. Griffith Baugher, Hyman Berg, 
Phil Burkom, Jim Burnside, Slater Clarke, Jim Hardev, Doyle 
Royal, Alvin Salganick, manager, and William Brendle, fresh- 
man manager. 

Burkom, Burnside and Hardey will be lost. 

RIFLE — Frank Carpenter, Ulrich Geller, Guy Goodman, 
Lawrence Haskins, Jr., Raymond Hodgins, Alden Imus, Fletcher 
Jones, John Marzolf, Paul Newgarden, Robert Rands, William 
Reith, Robert Rivello, Lacy Hall, manager, and Vernon Mc- 
Kinstry, freshman manager. 

Hodgins, Haskins, Imus and Marzolf will be lost. 

Minor awards went to the following golfers: 

William Cook, Robert Harmon, Gail Holmes and Leonard 
Liebman. 

Liebman will be lost. 

Spring Season Is Good, 

Except On Diamond 

WITH the exception of the baseball teams — both 
varsity and freshman — Mankind combinations 
in spring sports played fully up to expectations, to cap- 
ture a majority of their contests. 

Despite the fact that the ball team lost 18 of 25 games, 
the varsity squads registered 29 wins against 27 defeats. 
With the rookie nine being the only team on the wrong 
side of the ledger, the yearlings had a total of 19 vic- 
tories against nine defeats. 

These records aie for teams in baseball, track, la- 
crosse and tennis and do not include the golf outfit, 



8 






JUNE — 1941 



which won a large majority of its contests. That pastime 

still is on a minor basis. 

Pitching Is Lacking 

Pitching was the big weakness ot the varsity and frosh 
ball teams, as both outfits scored fullj as many, if not 
more rims, than in normal seasons. 

In addition to the records below, the tracksters scored 
heavily in title meets, the varsity being third in the 
Southern Conference and winning the District A. A. U. 
team championship with the frosh in second place 

Although losing the national title after holding it For 
two years, the varsity lacrosse team did all right. It won 
8 of 11 games, losing three, as it figured it would, be- 
fore the season began. It appears certain that the stick 
outfit will get no worse than a tic for second place in 
the national rating, probably sharing this spot with 
Princeton and Army. 



An outstanding feal was performed l>\ llcck Horn, 

u ho helped the fiosh ti.it k team to an unbeaten season. 

lie broke all Universit) and Hud Stadium records by 
hurling the discus MS feel l 11 inches. Tins was the only 
track mark to be broken during the year. 

Good Frosh Material 

Frosh lacrosse, track and tennis squads will send up 
more than the usual number of good prospects and the 
baseball outfit, despite its poor record, will provide 
three or four players of high caliber. 

Here arc the records of the teams: 



\ \RSI I V 

w. I.. T. 

Lacrosse .8 3 

•Track 4 3 

Baseball , " 18 

Tennis 10 3 



I Kl SIIMI \ 

\\ I. I 
Lacrosse 3 1 

Track f> 

Baseball 3 r> <> 



fi 







otals 29 

Grand Totals 



Totals 19 9 

Won 4S Lost 36 Tied 



MANY OLD GRADS (Continued from Page 3) 

ber of the class of 1887, brought an enlarged picture of 
the prize-winning M. A. C. cadet company, which won 
second honors in the National Encampment and Drill, 
held in Washington, D. C, in 1887. Mr. Woolford 
was second sergeant in the company and Mr. Melvin C. 
Hazen was first lieutenant. The National Encampment 
assembled in Washington nearly a hundred crack drill 
companies from various sections of the country in the 
most extensive competitive drill ever held. 

Sergeant Woolford presented, on behalf of his fellow 
collegians, a picture of this company to be placed in the 
collection of past honors of his Alma Mater. Mr. Wool- 
ford is founder and president of the Retail Credit Co., 
and formerly an Eastern Shoreman. Following his pre- 
sentation remarks he conferred on President Byrd mem- 
bership in the Nation's One Hundred Percent Efficiency 
Club for outstanding accomplishments. 

President Byrd received the picture on behalf of the 
University and expressed grateful appreciation for the 
honor Mr. Woolford had conferred upon him. He 
lauded Mr. Woolford for his accomplishments in or- 
ganizing a great business industry. 
Annual Meeting 

President Chichester called the annual meeting of 
the Association to order and asked the secretary for a 
resume of the minutes of the previous meeting with a 
treasurer's report. The President then made a few re- 
marks, introduced the past presidents and the reunion 
classes. 

Committee reports were then heard. The first from 

r. R. M. Watkins, '23, chairman of the Alumni Ath- 
tic Committee. 

The special committee of the University of Maryland 
lumni Board, composed of R. M. Watkins, Chairman; 

mar Crothers, Jr., J. M. Lescure and Charles W. Syl- 



vester met with Dr. II. C. Byrd, President of the Uni- 
versity. The committee laid before Dr. Bvrd a general 
proposition whereby the Alumni Association offered its 
services and pledged its cooperation to the University 

authorities in improving athletics at the University. 

President Byrd concurred in the suggestion and ex- 
pressed his appreciation for the spirit of the Alumni 
Board in offering its assistance. President Bvrd then 
gave a comprehensive picture of the whole athletic pro- 
gram and its future policy. From the discussion the fol- 
lowing conclusions may be drawn: 

1. That the University athletic authorities intend to 
continue intercollegiate competition in athletics on a 
high plane and meet those institutions whose standards 
are comparable to ours. 

2. That it appears possible to work out an arrange- 
ment through the Alumni whereby definite help may 
be given to worthy students of high and prep schools 
through the establishment of Alumni scholarships. 

3. That President Bvrd considers it desirable to dis- 
cuss the entire situation with the General Alumni Coun- 
cil, including the special committee from the Alumni 
Board. 

Dr. F. B. Bomberger, '95, chairman of the Alumni 
Fund Trustees, reported that because of sickness and 
business pressure little had been clone during the past 
year but inasmuch as next year was to be the Golden 
Anniversary of our Association the Trustees were focus- 
ing their plans to make 1942 the Golden Year. 
Parker, '05, President 

Chairman Charles W. Sylvester, 08. of the Nominat- 
ing Committee, presented the following slate: For pres 
ident, Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, of Pocomokc City, Md.: 
first vice-president, Mr. R. M. Watkins, '23. of Calvert 
Hills, Md.; second vice-president. Mr. Austin C. Diggs. 

(Continued on Next Page) 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



FELLOW ALUMNI (Continued from Page 2) 

policy it is necessary to have whole-hearted support and 
cooperation from all Alumni — recent graduates and 
graduates who. though not old, arc of an earlier vintage. 

I have read somewhere that there are three kinds of 
Alumni: first, a small group of those who make things 
happen; second, a larger group consisting of those who 
watch things happen; third, a much larger group, in- 
cluding an overwhelming majority who have no idea of 
what is happening. 

It is my sincere hope that, during the coming year, 
the Alumni of the University of Maryland will, more 
than ever hefore, realize the importance of their posi- 
tion toward the University, the tremendous influence 
for good they can have on its future and the fact that 
their continued indifference make it more difficult for 
the institution to acquire and maintain its rightful place 
among the leading Universities in the country. 

We all have an added incentive to arouse and stim- 
ulate our interest this year. It is the fiftieth vear of ex- 
istence of the Alumni Association, A Golden Anniver- 
sary. Surclv all the hovs, from the fifty-year-old grad to 
the babe born graduation week of 1941 should, and I 
feel will, want to contribute from their stores of knowl- 
edge, influence and affluence, begun at the University 
of Maryland, and increased in the University of Life 
to the grand old Institution on the Hill. 

Join those Alumni who are making things happen. 
Begin living a new college life with your old friends and 
make new ones. By so doing you will enjov vour return 
visits to the campus, always feel at home there and in 
addition increase your service to your old school, your 
pleasure in living and be a greater benefit to the world 
in general. 

Other messages will be broadcast from time to time. 
"Tune in on the Alumni News." 

Sincerely, 
A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 

MANY OLD GRADS (Continued from Page 9) 

'21, of Baltimore. Four members-at-large — To repre- 
sent men: Mr. Omar Crothers, Jr., '28, of Elkton, Md., 
and Mr. C. V. Koons, '29, of Washington, D. C; to rep- 
resent women: Miss May Louise Woods, '28, of Silver 
Spring, Md., and Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32, of 
Towson, Md. All were unanimously elected. 

Following the annual meeting the Boards of Repre- 
sentatives met in the Dean's office of the various col- 
leges and selected their new members and appointed the 
college representatives on the General Alumni Board. 
Class Reunions 

In addition to 1891, another class in the 90's had a 
good report. While not many were present, Clifton E. 
Fuller of Cumberland, said all members had been heard 



Prof. W. T. L. Taliaferro [Succumbs 

A well-known, loved and admired man with many 
friends has been called from among the living. Dr. \Y. 
T. L. Taliaferro, retired faculty member, died at his 
home in College Park on June 4. Funeral services were 
held at 9 A. M. on Alumni Day, June 6. President P. \Y. 
Chichester, '20, of the Alumni Association, was a pall- 
bearer. 

Never a more impressive character traversed the cam- 
pus or served on the faculty of our Alma Mater. For no 
man has been more a part of every student or faculty in 
the University of Man land than Professor Taliaferro. 

He was verv near to the heart of many Alumni who 
had had the good fortune to have benefited bv his knowl- 
edge and wisdom. He had a philanthropic mind and gave 
unselfishly his services for the people, which is an in- 
spiration to our youth. Many Alumni deeply regret the 
passing of this noble person, as few others will go from 
the midst of the living and leave a sense of deeper per- 
sonal loss than this splendid man, who has been taken 
by death from the intimate affections of so many 
friends. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association the News takes 
this occasion to express sincere condolence to the loved 
ones with whom he lived. 

from and he had received a full report on their auto- 
biography. 

In the class of 1901 his highness, H. C. "Dick" White- 
ford, presented himself as representing 100% of the 
surviving members. 

There were two rivals in class reunions, 1916, cele- 
brating their twenty-fifth anniversary, and 1921, their 
twentieth anniversary. It is hard to tell which had the 
best time. The boys of 1921 said they were just tuning 
up for a real twenty-fifth reunion. 

Other five-year reunion classes with representatives 
were 1911, 1926, 1931, and 1936. Lieut. H. C. Byrd, 
Jr., '36, U. S. A., came from Camp Jackson, S. C, to 
be on hand for his first five-year reunion 

Senior Class - Faculty - Alumni Dinner 

For the first time in many years the Senior Class and 
the Alumni joined forces in presenting a Class Day pro- 
gram on Alumni Day. The seniors, several hundred 
strong, attended the dinner in the University Dining 
Hall, led by Robert Rice, president, and John G. Reck- 
ord, president of the Student Government Association. 

Senator Millard E. Tydings, '10, had expected to be 
present and deliver the principal address on the inau- 
gural occasion of the Alumni and Senior Dinner but un- 
avoidable business duties took him to New York at 
the last minute. He deeply regretted missing the op- 
portunity to talk to the combined forces of seniors and 
Alumni for a greater University of Maryland. 



10 



JUNE — 1941 



Dr. Byrd Spoke 

Dr. II. C. Byrd gave .1 comprehensive outline ol the 
University's program and reviewed rather completeh 
the athletic plan. The following excerpts are from Dr. 
Byrd's remarks. 

"When you as seniors beeonie Alumni after \i)it u 
ceive your diplomas tomorrow morning, you accept new 
responsibilities in your relationship to this Institution. 

"... Let me say to you that the University is not 
going to build itself into anj greater, any more useful, 
institution as far as the State and the people of Man 
land are concerned, than your work and achievement 
warrant. 

"... Two or three rumors have got around in regard 
to athletics. 1 do not know how they could have got 
around unless someone thought 1 was complete!) bereft 
of my senses, but in one way or another it seems that 
the rumor has gone around that we were going to 
abolish all our intereolegiate schedules. We are going to 
do nothing of the kind. We are going to continue to 
play the kind of schools that will be a credit to the Uni- 
versity and we are going to have teams good enough to 
compete on even terms with such schools. 

"... I do not sec any reason why the Alumni should 
not establish scholarships at the University. Make them 
permanent and have them awarded through the schol- 
arship committee and have it understood that no man 
is to receive one of those scholarships simply because he- 
is a football player. 

. . . We have far-reaching plans. We have plans 
which would go far into the future and will encompass 
work of all kinds in the State of Maryland. What we are 
going to do the next year in regard to new equipment 
and new buildings will not be a great deal. There will 
be some. In Baltimore we will have a new addition to 
the Nurses' Home. Here at College Park we are going 
to build a new armory that will adequately house the 
Military Department." 

Senior Awards 

Following the dinner Class Day exercises by the sen- 
iors were presented on the Terrace in front of the Library 
under a mellow full moon such as you sec only on the 
"Campus on the Hill." Special entertainment preceded 
the awarding of top honors to the seniors who had per- 
formed outstanding accomplishments during their four 
years at Maryland. Those receiving honors were: 
Men's Citizenship Prize, offered by President II. C. 

Byrd, class of 1908, was awarded to John G. Reckord 

of Baltimore. 
Women's Citizenship Prize, offered by Mrs. Albert F. 

Woods, was awarded to Carolyn Barnes Gray of 

Poolesville. 
The Mortar Board Cup, offered to the woman having 

the highest scholastic average went to Mildred Vir- 



ginia Stubbs ol Mount Rainier. 
I In American Institute oi C :i ic mist-. Medal foi the 
highest average in chemistrj went to Richard Ah/an 
Clark nt Alexandria, \ 1 

Service Award, offered l>\ tin st.iti ol the ( )Hi i nt the 

Dean ol Women, went to l.ul.i Esthei Sargcant ol 

Silvei Spring, \ld. 
The I lonoi Ke\. offered bj the class ol 1 ( 0> ol the 

School ol Business Administration ol the University 

ol Maryland at Baltimore, was awarded to Norman 

Harold Silverman of Washington, I). C 
Bernard L. Groziei Award, offered b\ the Maryland 

Association oi Engineers, was awarded to Lawrence 

[udson Hodgins, Jr. ol College Park. 
The American Society of Civil Engineers Award went 

to Lawrence (nelson Hodgins, Jr.. of College I'.u k. 
Alpha Lambda Delta Sororit) Award for the highest 

scholastic average, was awarded to Mildred Virginia 

Stubbs of Mount Rainier. 
Sigma Alpha Omicron Award in Bacteriology was 

awarded to Ruth Estcllc Evans. 
The Hillegeist Memorial Award for Excellence in I . 

lish, offered by Mrs. W. \1. Hillegeist in memory of 

her husband, the late W'illiard M. Hillegeist. '12. 

former Director of Admissions, was awarded to MolK 

B. Tulin of Hartford, Conn. 
The Charles B. Hales Award in Dramatics to the senior 

man and woman outstanding in dramatics went to 

Albert Stillman Coleman and Earla Ball Marshal. 

Immediately following the Exercises the grand finale 
of social activities, the Commencement Ball, was held 
in the Gym-Armory, which was elaborately decorated in 
summer colors. Seniors, Alumni and faculty danced to- 
gether in the final social event of the school year, 1940- 
1941. The next day those seniors of 1941 became infant 
Alumni at the one hundred and thirty-fourth Com- 
mencement Exercises. 

Reception At Rossborough 

Carrying out the tradition of the Rossborough Inn as 
a social center, the Alumni Association held a reception 
for the returning old graels. faculty and members of the 
senior class. 

In the receiving line with President and Mrs. P. \\ . 
Chichester were Dr. Byrd, Mr. Robert Rice, president of 
the senior class; Miss Elizabeth Powers, secretary of the 
senior class and Miss Jeanne M. Santamarie. president 
of Mortar Board. 

Coeds, dressed in Colonial costumes acting the part 
of hostesses added much to the atmosphere of welcome 
and hospitality. In the garden a quartet of neg 
dressed as slaves provided music by playing and sm^in^ 
plantation songs and negro spirituals. It was an atmos 
pliere which exists in onl\ one place, the Rossborough 
Inn. Alumni inecca on Homecoming and Alumni Day. 



U 



PATRICIA MORISON 

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currently appearing in Paramovnl's 

"The Roundup 







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EVERYWHERE YOU GO 



7ne&^dZc<Mfy 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 






bJ 
W) 
o 






U 



O' 

O r-t 

0)i O 



U 




JULY. 1941 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JULY, 1941 



Number 



Alumni Association -University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomokc City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semllr, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Loncridge, '29 Education 

J. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 



GROUP LEADERS 



ALLEGANY COUNTY: 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Be[ Air, Md 

R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 



E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 
C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

E. Gordon Hammond, 
A. Brackett, '21, 



FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom 
Secretary, Frederick, Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. 



Mary Fisher, 
Sarah Morris, '25, 



Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; 
Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 
Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W. ; Charles 
V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. 
Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

Jambs W. Stevens, '19 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

M. 15. Stevens, '27 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



A. K. Besley, '23 

II B. Shipley, '14 
Stewart McCaw, '35.. 

K E. Powell, '13 

Geary Eppley, '18 

I.. K. Bopst, '16 

Jim Kehoe, '40 



Baseball 

Basket Ball 

Boxing 

Lacrosse 

Track 

Tennis 
..Cross Country 



Lewis W. Thomas, '28 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 

M. M. Clark, '22 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 

James M. Swartz '19 

H. R. Devilrliss, '11 

E. F. Zalsak, '25 



Football 

At Large 



COVER PICTURE 

1*| f^HE new Administration Build- 
i^ ing, from a drawing made by 
O. R. Carrington, '28, for the Terra- 
pin, yearbook. 

This building faces west and is 
located in the valley on the north 
campus. It forms the eastern end of 
a quadrangle which has the new 
Home Economics, Agriculture, Arts 
and Sciences on the south side; Anne 
Arundel Hall, Girls' Dorm on the 
west, and the Poultry Building, Hor- 
ticulture, Engineering, and Margaret 
Brent Hall on the north side. Land- 
scaping of the new campus now is 
progressing rapidly and will be com- 
pleted by Homecoming, October 18. 

The new Administration Building 
houses the offices of the President, 
Controller, Director of Admissions, 
and Registrar. The Director of Ath- 
letics, Dean of Men, and Alumni 
Office. Also the Student Govern- 
ment and Publication Offices, the 

Bookstore and Post Office. 

• • • 

FELLOW ALUMNI: 

Summer time is when a fellow 
should be allowed to go fishing in 
peace, especially when he lives in a 
fisherman's country as I do, Poko- 
moke City, Maryland, on old East- 
ern Shore. But the Editor of our 
publication reminds me that a letter 
from me is desired. If so, here it is 
straight from the shoulder. 

You read in the last issue of the 
News what President Byrd said at 
the Alumni-Senior Class Dinner, but 
let me repeat it to keep your mem- 
ory refreshed. "Let me say to you 
that the University is not going to 
build itself into any greater, any 
more useful institution as far as the 
(Continued on Page 9) 



U.M*MJ& 





Maryland's First Prize Drill Company, 1887 



ll/aalfobd PleA&ntl Above, Picture *7a fynw&ility, 



PUBLICITY IN 1887 



In the last issue of the Alumni News, it was men- 
tioned that Cator Woolford, '87, founder and president 
of the Retail Credit Company, presented a picture of a 
prize cadet company to the University, but space did 
not permit a great deal of elaboration. Also, the picture 
of Mr. Woolford making the presentation to President 
Bvrd was spoiled by the photographer in printing, so 
no picture. But we have a picture of that prize com- 
pany, one of Mr. Woolford of a few years ago, and a 
photostatic copy of the publicity about the company 
as it appeared in the Washington paper in 1887. 

This company was commanded by Cadet Capt. }. B. 
Weems, '87, deceased. Second in command was Cadet 
First Lieutenant Melvin C. Hazen, '87, deceased. The 
Cadet Second Sergeant Cator Woolford, '87, donor of 
the picture in honor of his fellow students. 

The National Encampment and Drill held in June. 
1887, was and still is the biggest thing of its kind ever 
held. Crack drill companies, state militia, and military 
college and organizations from all over the country 
came to Washington for the competition. The drill was 
held on the Ehpse south of the White House. The 
companies camped on the Monument Grounds. 



Sergeant Woolford, fortu- 
natclv, was assigned to a 
rather important post during 
the drill. He was special 
attache to the drill commit- 
tee and was in charge of 
having companies ready and 
on time for their period of 
drill. Not only did he carry 
out his duties, but became 
a good observer for the ben- 
efit of his company as well. 
Consequently, when the 
Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lege Cadet Company per- 
formed, they were nearly 
perfect and came off with 
second honors. 



A Clipping from a Wash- 
ington newspaper which 
Mr. Woolford has in his 
scrap hook from college 
days. 




the n*am>D cadets. 

•A. Drill Company Comlnf from the 
Agricultural College. 

The Cadets or Uie Man land Agricultural College 
will go lolo camp Monday aud contest for the 
cadet prize. The Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lego Is located at College 
Station, Prince George's 
County, on the B. £ u. R 
K.. eK'bt miles froru 
Washington. The ln.it i- 
tut Ion was founded in 
1k">h by a stock company 
for the advancement of 
agricultural science, 
when there was scarcely 
another college of it* 
class In the VniteJ 
States. A few years 
later, when Con^Tesa 
bad provided for the es- 
tablishment of a college 
In every SUM to pro- 

carr. J. a. wrens. 

Dote scientific agricul- 
ture and the mechanical 
•rts, the state of Mar/. 
land bought a control- 
ling interest In this col- 
lege and made It the 
buneflclary of the (uud 
aecruiBg to the state fur 
the purpose under the 
Government grunt of 
lands. In accordance 
with the law of Congress 
cf 1H«4 endowing suet 
colleges, regular mili- 
tary drills, together 
with th» study of mili- 
tary tactics, is required 
o( all students. Capt. 
3. B. Weems commands 
the (elected company 
which lakes part In the 
Uauoaai Drill The uni- 
form of the Cadeu ■ 
thai of ih.- v. rv Mili- 
tary Academy. 

Ui'ou Dunwoodie, on duty at the Sljrn.il office 
trilled toe cadets of the Maryland Agricultural 
« ollegr for several week.* prtor to the cuuipctuiw 
• ideidrllL 




MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 




Old Qiadk, (lecj,Utei 



Many old grads return to the campus at Homecoming 
and on Alumni Day who fail to register. Registering is 
the only way for the Alumni Office to know who were 
here. Many Alumnus think it will be necessary to pay 
Alumni dues if they register. That is not true. Any 
Alumnus may register without paying his dues. In fact, 
they are not called dues, but contributions to a worthy 
cause. 

Register when you come to the campus at Reunion 
time or any time, in the Alumni Office, as we wish to 
record vour visits and tell fellow Alumni that you were 
here. It is this esprit de corps that will bring your fellow 
Alumni back to the campus for reunions and, after all, 
that is the principal reason why you return, to see those 
fellows you knew in bygone days. In the future, your 
cooperation will be appreciated. 

Among those present for Alumni Day, June 6, 1941, 
were the following: 

CLASS OF 1880 — R. S. Griffith, M.D., Park Station, 
Wavncsboro, Va. 

CLASS OF 1891 — F. P. Veitch, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1892 — F. W. Besley, Baltimore, Md. 

CLASS OF 1894 — Chas. W. Cairnes, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1896 — Clifton E. Fuller, Cumberland Md. 

CLASS OF 1899 — J. J. Bctton, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1900 — Wm. D. Groflf, Owings Mills, Md.; 
Harry J. Kcfauvcr, Frederick, Md. 

CLASS OF 1901— II. C. Whiteford, Whitcford, Md. 

CLASS OF 1902 — J. Darby Bowman, Rockville, Md. 

CLASS OF 1903 — E. P. Walls, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1904 — H. W. Bumsidc, Washington, D. C; 
A. W. Valentine, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1905 — Clay P. Whiteford, Whiteford. Md. 

CLASS OF 1906 — J. J. T. Graham, Bowie, Md.; L. Fer- 
dinand Zerkel, Lurav, Va. 

CLASS OF 1908 — Norman F. Bricc, Millburn N. J.; Reu- 
ben Brigham, Ashton, Md.; G. C. Day. Fdniondson, Md.; 
Chas. \V. Sylvester, Baltimore, Md. 



MARYLAND'S NEW ARMORY 

As a part of the Defense Program the construction of 
the new Armory will be started on the campus this sum- 
mer. This Armory will be located in rear of the new 
Administration Building and face the boulevard. The 
cost will be more than $200,000 and will, for the first 
time, adequately house the Military Department. The 
Armorv will be approximatelv 240 feet long and 121 
feet wide. Even though there were more than twelve 
hundred men in the unit last year it is expected that 
this year will exceed that number. The military course 
presented at the University has an excellent rating by the 
War Department. The majority of the R. O. T. C. grad- 
uates are now in active dutv in the United States Army, 



CLASS OF 1909 — R. M. Ager, Chillum, Md.; Francis H. 
Drvden, Washington, D. C; J. O. A. Hallowav, Bellerose, 
N. Y. 

CLASS OF 1910 — Herschel H. Allen, Baltimore, Md.; J. 
Ray Stanton, Hvattsville, Md. 

CLASS OF 1911— H. Roland Devilbiss, Riverdale, Md. 

CLASS OF 1912 — W. B. Kemp, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1913— E. E. Powell, Towson, Md. 

CLASS OF 1914 — E. P. Williams, Hvattsville, Md. 

CLASS OF 1915 — C. Howard Buchwald, Baltimore, Md.; 
Hedley A. Clark, Baltimore, Md.; Ralph P. West, Be- 
thesda, Md. 

CLASS OF 1916 — L. E. Bopst, College Park, Md.; Bur- 
ton A. Ford, New York City, N. Y.; Wm. McLean, Bal- 
timore, Md.; Paul H. Morris, Front Royal, Va.; Kercheval 
E. Smith, Baltimore, Md.; John C. Sterling, Newport 
News, Va.; Edwin A. Taylor, Delmar, Md. 

CLASS OF 1917 — John A. Bromlev, Annapolis, Md. 

CLASS OF 1918 — P. E. Clark, Upper Marlboro, Md.; 
Gearv Epplev, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1920 — Peter W. Chichester, Frederick, Md. 

CLASS OF 1921 — Billie Bland, Havre de Grace, Md.; C. 
Walter Cole, Towson, Md.; Austin C. Diggs, Towson, 
Md.; John H. Eiseman, Chevy Chase, Md.; Leonard M. 
Goodwin, Baltimore, Md.; Bill Jester, Biglerville, Pa.; C. 
L. Mackert, Calvert Hills, Md.; Herbert R. Peddicord, 
Silver Spring, Md.; Robert M. Rausch, Washington, D. C; 
H. H. (Chick) Sene, Drexel Hill, Pa.; Frederick K. Slanker, 
Washington, D. C; E. B. Starkey, Baltimore, Md.; Jere 
H. Sullivan, Larchmont, N. Y.; Richard B. Thomas. Sil- 
ver Spring, Md.; Wm. Paul Walker, College Park, Md. 
(Continued on Page 10) 



JULY — 1941 



7Ue <Jla*uviahle 
Melvin C. aHoye*,, '88, 



The Alumni Association has a good reason to mourn 
the death of \lclvin C. I la/en. '88. He was oui Brsl 
President. It was he, in 1N ( )2. when the college needed 
the enthusiastic and loyal support of Uumni, who 
brought them together and organized the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. From a mere handful he has seen his Alma 
Mater and Association grow into its thousands of 
members. 

In his student days Mclvin Ila/en was a leader, lie 
was First Lieutenant of the pri/.e drill company at the 
National Encampment and Drill. Also, he was captain 
of the first athletic team to make history at the Uni- 
versity in 188". It was his team that performed a feat 
which has never been equaled in the history of Marx- 
land. They played St. John's College and the Navy on 
the same day and won both games. 

Mr. Hazen became a District of Columbia surveyor in 
1899 several years after graduating. Since then he has 
given generously of his services to our Nation's Capital. 
His rise was stcadv and continuous until he was given 
the honored position of chairman of the Hoard of 
Commissioners of the District of Columbia, the posi- 
tion he held at the time of his death. He zcalouslv gave 
his service to improve Washington and community in 
order to make it a better place in which to live. 

Several vears ago the citizens of Washington tendered 
Mr. Hazen a Testimonial Dinner indicating to him 
their admiration and gratitude for the great part he has 
played in building a greater Washington. 

In 1937 Mr. Hazen performed the honors for his class 
on Alumni Dav by raising the class flag in recognition 





[ft\ 




K 1 




II JML a 




■ PT 


W&lm 









Mr. and Airs. Hazen as they once again sit in a typical carriage of the 
vintage in which they started their honeymoon. This teas in the 
lobby of the Mayflower Hotel at the time when the Testi- 
monial Dinner was tendered Air. Hazen. 

of their Fiftieth Anniversary. In 1939 he. the captain 
of Mankind's first baseball team, threw out the ball 
to open Marvland's collegiate season in honor of the 
Centennial Celebration for the national pastime, found- 
ed in 1839. 



Seldom would Mr. Hazen 



Continued on Page 10 




Melvin C. Hazen, signing lot- 
President H. C. Byrd. 'OS. on 
the Fiftieth Anniversary of his 
class. Also shaking hands with 
the late E. S. Walker, 10. then 
the oldest living graduate. 



MARYLAND ALUMMI NEWS 



PHARMACY 
CENTENNIAL 
CELEBRATION 



A fourth time in the history of the University a pro- 
fessional school held a centennial celebration. In 1907. 
Medicine; in 1913, Law; in 1940. Dental, and in 1941, 
Pharmacy. 

The celebration just held, during Commencement 
W eek, presented an interesting four-day program, termi- 
nating with graduation exercises on Saturday, June 7, 
at College Park. 

The School of Pharmacy of the University was orig- 
inally the Maryland College of Pharmacy, incorporated 
under the laws of Maryland, January 27, 1841. At that 
time there were but seventy-seven drug stores in Balti- 
more, but the more forward-looking proprietors, real- 
izing that a broader and more thorough education must 
be given to replace apprenticeship, interested the citi- 
zens, and by private subscriptions the school began. 
From the beginning the school has kept pace and, more 
often, was in the vanguard of the advancement of phar- 
maceutical education. Many of the firsts in pharmacy 
can be attributed to graduates and faculty of the school. 
Graduates have played an important part in the shaping 
of pharmaceutical laws for the state. 

Everyone, from the leading state official. His Excel- 
lency, Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, LL.B., Governor of 
Maryland, to the humble storekeeper, took part in the 
celebration. Other prominent state and University lead- 
ers were Mayor Howard W. Jackson, Mrs. John L. 
Whitehurst (Secretary of the Board of Regents), Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, and Dean Andrew J. DuMez, Dean of 
Pharmacy. 

Alumni were the leading factors in the celebration, 
but were ably assisted by the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association, the Baltimore Drug Exchange, the Travel- 
ers' Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion, the American Pharmaceutical Association, and 
many others. President of the Pharmacy Alumni was Dr. 
T. Ellsworth Ragland, toastmaster at the banquet. Gen- 
eral Chairman of the celebration was Dr. Otto W. 
Muehlhause. Three sessions of clinics were held with 
several papers given by the most prominent men in 
American pharmacy. 

With more than eighteen hundred graduates located 
throughout the state, the University of Maryland School 
of Pharmacy continues to have influential effect on the 
development of pharmaceutical practices in Maryland. 
More than five hundred graduates participated in the 
celebration. 



PRESIDENT OF PHARMACY ALUMNI 




Dr. Otto W. Muehlhause, '13, Pharmacy Dr., former 
general chairman of the Pharmacy School Centennial 
Celebration, has been elected President of the Phar- 
macy Alumni Association for the ensuing year. Dr. 
Muehlhause is a prominent druggist in Baltimore and 
takes an active part in all pharmaceutical affairs. His con- 
stant efforts in behalf of Alumni Association activities 
gained for him the leadership position. 
• • • 

WALTER CLARK, '02, DECEASED 

The University of Maryand and the Citv of Balti- 
more have lost a most eminent Alumnus and citizen in 
the death of Walter Clark, '02, LL.B. A Pennsylvanian 
by birth but a Marylander by adoption, Walter Clark 
became a most prominent son. He began the practice of 
law in Baltimore soon after graduation, and his perform- 
ance in his profession won for him great admiration by 
his fellowmen. He has served Baltimore on the Citv 
Service Commission, has been President of the Mary- 
land Bar Association, President of the Baltimore Bar 
Association, taught law at the University Law School, 
a member of the American Law Institute, and the Amer- 
ican Bar Association. 

His interest in the betterment of the legal profession 
prompted him to leave a portion of his estate to the 
University Law School with the hope that it would be 
used to influence the bar and the public and lead to the 
establishment of better standards of education than now 
exist in law. Walter Clark was a greatly admired man by 
those in his profession, as he was one who acted as to 
his own character and legal knowledge directed him. 
The University will revere the memory of this esteemed 
son. 



JULY — 1941 



DIGGS ELECTED VICE-PRESIDENT 



Mr. Austin C. Diggs, '21, 
prominent business man of 
Baltimore, was elected second 
Vice-President at the annual 
meeting of the Alumni Asso 
ciation. lie resides in low son. 
Maryland. 

Diggs has always been ac- 
tive in Alumni affairs. As a 
booster for the U. of M. he has 
no superior. His leadership be- 
gan in college days, when 
Diggs, as cheerleader, made the 
team do what they didn't 
know they could. lie is the 
dean of cheerleaders. 
Other new members on the Alumni Board are Mrs. 
Agnes McNutt Kricker, '31 (Mrs. W. M. Kriekcr), and 
Miss Mary Louise Wood, '28, Rcprcsentative-at- Large 
for Women. Mrs. Kricker now resides near Towson, 
Maryland, and is a member of Kappa Kapa Gamma 
and a graduate in Home Economics. Miss Woods is a 
graduate in the College of Education, was active in ex- 
tra-curricular activities, especially the New Mercer Lit- 
erary Society. She teaches at the Montgomery Blair 
Junior High School near Silver Spring, Mankind. 

Mr. }. A. Bromley, '17, comes to the Board as a rep- 
resentative of the College of Engineering. He is Countv 
Roads Engineer, located in Annapolis. Mrs. Edith 




Austin C. Diggs, '21 



Burnside Whiteford, '2 { K forma Representative-at 
Large, has been returned to the Bo. ml bj the ColU . 
Aits and Sciences as one oi then representatives. 

Othei members of the Board, in addition to the I 
ident, arc R. \l. \\ atkins. '23, I irsl \ ii i President, who 
is ,i real estate' operatoi in Prince George's County, and 
a member of the Barks and Planning Commission. Id 
win Semler, '23, Representative oi \its and Sciences, 
coaches athletics at Ilagcrstown High School and has 
a Sporting goods business. ). 1'. Shacllci. '28, ol I 

neering, is a commercial engineer for the P. I P ( lorn 
pany of Washington, 1). C, and resides in Bethesda, 
Maryland. M. B. Stevens, '28, of Education, is a patent 
attorney in Washington. D. C. and resides in Chew 
Chase, Mankind. J.C. Longridge, '29, resides in College 
Park and is affiliated with Read Murdock, wholesale 
grocers, of Baltimore. J. M. Lescure. '23, of Agriculture, 
is production manager for (Continued on /'age 10) 
• • • 

DR. BROUGHTON NAMED ON 
STATE COMMISSION 

Governor Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, LL.B., has ap- 
pointed Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08, Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences and State Chemist, a member of 
the State Department of Gcologv, Mines, and Water 
Resources. Dr. Broughton is a chemist by profession and 
is well acquainted with gcologv and soil chemistry. This 
appointment is a result of the general reorganization 
of the State Natural Resources Commission and re- 
quires his part-time attention. 




Honor Winning Students, 1941 

Left to Right — Jack Mueller, Lacrosse Medal; William Holbrook, Goddard Medal; Dr. Roger B. Corhett. Vacuity (presented 

honors to Holbrook); Thomas Fields, Linhardt Ring; Dr. L. B. Broughton, Chairman of Honors Assembly; Bill lingljnd. 

Baseball Award; Dr. J. Ben Robinson, Dean of Dental School, Principal Speaker; Robert Smith, Silvester Award. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Faber TSlotv Athletic Director 




Dr. John E. Faber 



Dr. John E. Faber, 
Jack, to most of 
us, has been put in 
charge of intercol- 
legiate athletics at 
Maryland, to serve 
until the return of 
Geary (Swede) 
Eppley, the reg- 
ular incumbent, 
who is in the mil- 
itary service. 

H i s appoint- 
ment, of course, 
was made by Pres- 
ident H. C.' Byrd. 

Eppley, who al- 
so is dean of men 
at Maryland, is on 
dutv at Fort Geo. 



Meade. Md. He is a reserve major. 

Faber's appointment as pinch-hitter for Eppley defi- 
nitely assures that he, Al Heagy and Al Woods, the 
alumni-faculty football coaching staff which was put in 
charge last fall, will continue on the job. Faber is chair- 
man of the grid group as well as head coach of lacrosse in 
which he also has gained national prominence. 

Faber's main position, though, is associate professor 
in bacteriology. He has been at Maryland ever since ma- 
triculating as a student in the fall of 1922 from Eastern 
High School of Washington. 

During his playing days he was a great basketer, being 
an all-time all-Maryland selection; was an outstanding 
lacrosse player and a football quarterback. 

His success in sports was due to brains, not brawn, as 
he weighed less than 150 pounds when in competition. 

Since getting his B.S. in 1926, he continuously has 
been connected with coaching at College Park, always 
in some capacity in football. He got his master's degree 
in 1927 and his Ph.D. in 1937, both at Maryland. 

Jack did his first coaching at Maryland when he took 
charge of the 1927 lacrosse team, of which he was cap- 
tain, when Prof. R. V. Truitt, the regular mentor, was 
taken ill and had to go to Florida for a time. 

Faber is popular both in faculty circles and among his 
fellow coaches and the athletes. He is aided by Heagv in 
lacrosse and these two, with Woods, make a happy fam- 
ily in football tutoring. 



Florida Game To Be 

Homecoming Event 

Maryland's homecoming football game this fall will 
be with Florida, which will be met at College Park on 
October 18. This will be the fourth game of the cam- 
paign. 

The Terps' 9-game schedule calls for no contest so 
far distant that their followers cannot be on hand, the 
longest trip being to New Brunswick to plav Rutgers. 

Three games will be played in Baltimore, a like num- 
ber at College Park and one in nearbv Washington. 

Here is the card: 
Sept. 27 — Hampden-Sydney, College Park 
Oct. 3 — Western Maryland. Baltimore Stadium. (Night) 
Oct. 11 — Duke, Baltimore Stadium 
Oct. 18 — Florida, College Park (Homecoming) 
Oct. 25 — Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
Nov. 1 — Rutgers, New Brunswick 
Nov. 8 — Georgetown, Washington 
Nov. 15— V. M. I., College Park 

Now 20 — Washington and Lee (Thanksgiving) Baltimore 
Stadium. 

• • • 

Jack Mueller Is All- America 

Jack Mueller, who played a great game at center for 
the Old Liners this spring, has been named for the sec- 
ond defense post on the all-America team as selected by 
the United States Lacrosse Association. 

Mueller played consistently fine lacrosse all during 
the three years he performed for the Terp varsity and 
fully deserved the national honor. 

Jordan Sexton, second attack, and Al Slesinger, out 
home, were chosen for the second team. 

All three were picked for the all-South squad that de- 
feated the all-North team in a thrilling game in Balti- 
more on Juh 1 1 by a 7 to 6 score. Sexton and Slesinger 
shared in the triumph but Mueller was kept from action 
by illness. 

Slesinger, who will be a senior in the fall, will be the 
only one of the three Terps to return. 

The complete first all-America team is as follows: 

Goal — Tyler Campbell, Princeton; Point — John 
Tolson, Hopkins; Cover Point — Nelson Shawn, Hop- 
kins; First Defense — Augustus Brady, Navy; Second 
Defense — John Mueller, Maryland; Center — Fred 
Donnelly, Swarthmore; Second Attack — Joseph Thig- 
pen, Army; First Attack — Charles Thomas, Hopkins; 
Out Home — Joseph Wilder, Dartmouth; In Home — 
Herbert Fitch, Hobart. 



8 



JULY — 1941 



DUVALL AND WHARTON OUTSTANDING 

Merle DuVall and Jim (Pop) Wharton arc the only 
three letter men at Maryland. They hail from Baltimore 
and both will be seniors this fall. They have played to- 
gether in the same sports in gaining their triple honors 
in football, basket ball and baseball. Both are being 
banked on heavily for the 1941 eleven. 

• • • 

YOUNG BROUGHTON IS ATHLETE 

Bamet Bronghton, son of Dr. Levin Broughton, dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, played goalie for 
the freshman lacrosse team last spring. lie also is pres- 
ident-elect of the Sophomore Class. 

• • • 

FEW GRIDMEN MAY BE LOST 

Maryland, like other schools, is certain to lose some 
football men to the service, but due to the fact that it 
has such a fine R. O. T. C. unit, that so many of its 
athletes are engineering students and that the student 
body is younger than the average, may not be so hard hit. 

Three tackles were lost by scholastic failures, one of 
them being the ace lineman of the 1940 frosh team. 
The others were reserve players last fall, one a big back 
who was shifted to tackle to perform imprcssivclv in the 
spring drills. 

It probably will be reporting time on September 1 
before it definitely will be known just how the squad 

will size up. 

• • • 

OCHSENREITER THIRD IN TITLE RACE 

Gene Ochsenreiter, Maryland runner, finished third 
in the half-mile event of the recent junior national A. 
A. U. championships in Philadelphia. He starred at bas- 
ket ball last winter and with the tracksters in the spring 

meets. 

• • • 

CHARLEY KELLER HIGHLY PRAISED 

Grantland Rice, probably the best known sports writer 
in the country, payed Charlev Keller of Marvland and 
the Yankees a high tribute as a ball player and a man 
in a recent article. 



Married — Major Meil D. Burgee, '27, a former diamond star 
for the Terps, and Miss Olga Grace Bedell of Washington, were 
married June 28 last. Meii, a member of Alpha Tau Omega, now 
is Commandant at Charlotte Hall Military Academy. The Burgees 
will be at home, Charlotte Hall, Md., after August 15. 


Army — Lieut. Harry Clifton Byrd, Jr., '36, now is stationed 
at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He will soon report to Fort 
Benning, Ga., for officers' school. 



Army — William P. Cole II, '40, is now in the 115th Artillery 
Unit at Fort George Meade, Md. Billy was one of the Terps' 
former star lacrossers. This past spring he played with Mt. Wash- 
ington Club in Baltimore. 



THE PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

< i mtinued from I'.i^c 3 1 
State and the people ot Maryland are concerned, than 
your work and achievement warrant." Dr. Bud was talk 

ing to you and me. Now that is a definite challenge and 
there is no better year to answer that challenge than 
when we are to celebrate the Fiftieth .\nni\cisai\ ot our 
Association. So I ask you to accept with me the respon- 
sibility of making our Association the most indispen- 
sable unit in the University of Maryland. 

It is with deep regret th.it 1 hear of the death of our 
eminent Alumnus and first President of our Association, 
Melvin C. I la/en. '88. 1 am confident each Alumnus 
joins me in mourning the loss of such a noble character 
and an inspirational leader to us all. 
Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 

• • • 

PROMINENT SURGEON DIES 

Dr. Julius Friedenwald, '90, M.D., died at his home 
in Baltimore last month. For more than fiftv years Dr. 
Friedenwald was one of Baltimore's leading surgeons, 
lie was one of the University's most eminent Alumnus 
and has the distinction of being a descendant of one of 
the founders of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
now a part of the University Medical School. At the 
time of his death he was Professor Emeritus of Gastro- 
Enterologv in the School. 

Dr. Friedenwald had a wide experience in medical 
circles, having studied in Berlin, Paris, Vienna and 
London. He belonged to numerous medical organiza- 
tions of local, national and international standing. He 
was a Past President of the Baltimore Medical Society. 

Two brothers arc also prominent physicians and 
Alumni: Dr. Harry Friedenwald, '00, noted eve special- 
ist and Dr. Edgar B. Friedenwald, '04, Professor of 

Clinical Pediatrics, both on the Medical School faculty. 

• • • 

EASTERN SHORE PHYSICIAN DIES 

A prominent physician of Eastern Shore. Dr. R. R. 
Norris, '03, M.D., died at his home in Crisficld last 
month. He was born in Washington, D. C, got his med- 
ical education in Baltimore, settled on the Shore in 1905 
and began the practice of medicine. 

He is a veteran of the First World War, serving as 
commander of a Field Hospital of the Second Army. He 
has also served as assistant surgeon in the United States 
Public Health Service and as examiner for the United 
States Veterans' Bureau. At the time of his death he 
was a member of the surgical staff of the McCrcad\ 
Memorial Hospital. 



OLD GRADS, REGISTER NOW 

(Continued from Page 4) 

CLASS OF 1922 — M. M. Clark. Chew Chase. Md.; Mil- 
dred S. Jones, Washington, D. C: Win. W. Kirby, Rock- 
vffle, Md. 

CLASS OF 1923 — W. Kirk Beslev. College Park. Md.; 
Dr. C. W. England, College Park. Md.; Austin A Mc 
Bride, Huntington, Pa.; J. Philip Schaefer, Bethesda, 
Md.; Adele Stamp. College Park. Md.; R. M. Watkins, 
Calvert 1I.1K. Md.; C. E. White, College Park. Md. 

CLASS OF 1924 — Ccorge Darcv, College Park, Md.; R. 
G. Rothgeb, Takoma Park. Md. 

CL \SS ( )l L925— Mis Geary Eppley, College Park, Md.; 
Grace Eve Hale. Bloomfield. N. J.; George J. Luckey, 
\\ ashington, D. C: Mabel M. Nash, Alexandria, Va.; T. 
]. Vandoren, Washington. D. C; M. Frances Wolfe. 
Silver Spring, Md.; L. G. Worthington. Berwyn, Md.; 
Emanuel Zalesak, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1926 — Arthur E. Bonnet. Washington. D. C; 
Tom Browne. Waufaca, Wisconsin; Major J. R. Lanigan, 
Philadelphia. Pa.; J. C. Longridge, College Park, Md.; 
Olive W. McBride, Huntington, Pa.; Jack Ray, Washing- 
ton. D. C; Lieut. Geo. H. Schmidt, Baltimore. Md.; E. 
A. Walker. College Park, Md.; Dorothy O. Young, Be- 
thesda, Md. 

CLASS OF 1927 — Roger S. Whiteford, Ruxton, Md 

CLASS OF 1928 — Lewis W. Thomas. Jr., Washington, 
D. C. 

CLASS OF 1929 — Omar D. Crothers, Jr., Elkton, Md.; C. 
V. Koons, Washington, D. C; Katharine A. Longridge, 
College Park, Md.; Edith B. Whiteford (Mrs. Roger S.), 
Ruxton. Md. 

CLASS OF 1930 — W. W. Cobey, College Park, Md.; 
Mrs. Carolyn Chesser Coppinger, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1931— Mary Koons Ambrose, College Park. 
Md.; Jos. H. Deckman, Washington, D. C; Martha Ross 
Temple, Baltimore, Md.; Fletcher P. Veitch, Jr., Ar- 
lington, Va. 

CLASS OF 1932 — Joseph N. Sanford, Green Acres, Md. 

CLASS OF 1933 — John P. Huebsch, Branchville, Md.; 
Mis. Sanny Hardiman Williams, College Park, Md. 

CLASS OF 1934 — F. H. Cutting, Milwaukee, Wis.; Erna 
M. Riedel, Gambrills, Md. 

CLASS OF 1935 — Ray F. Chapman, Washington, D. C; 
Ruth A. Jclile, Hyattsville, Md.; Paul R. Poffcnbcrger, Col- 
lege Park, Md.; John A. Silkman, Baltimore, Md. 

CLASS' OF 1936 — 11. C. Bvrd, Jr., Fort Jackson, S. C; 
Win. N. Garrott, Knoxville, Md.; George H. Sacks, 
Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1937 — Geo. F. Gilbert, College Park, Md.; 
Ruth F. Somerville, Cumberland, Md. 

CLASS OF 1938 — J. L. Schutx, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1939 — Evelyn Byrd, College Park, Md.; Rob- 
ert P. Cannon, Salisbury, Md.; E. Wayne Fitzwater, 
Quantico, Va.; Wm. D.'Groff, Jr., Owin'gs Mills, Md.; 
Jerry Hardy. Lanham, Md. 

CLASS OF 1940 — Marian Bond, Washington, D. G; 
Harold E. Cotterman, Jr., Jefferson Barracks, Missouri; An- 
namarie II. Fricke, Baltimore, Md.; Joseph S. Winter, 
Takoma, Park. Md. 

CLASS OF 1941 —Daniel O'Connell, Washington, D. C. 

FACULTY — V. J. Wyckoff, S. S. Steinberg, Mary A. 
Johnson, W. Mackenzie Stevens, Gwendolyn Drew, all of 
College Park, Md. 

Now don't forget to register wlicn you come back for 
Homecoming this fall, which will be Saturday, October 
18, at College Park. The University of Florida vs. 
Man land in football. Write now for your reservations. 
In fact, don't miss any of the games as the Terps are 
Marching On. 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS j 
HAZEN 

( Continued from Page 5 ) miss an Alumni gathering. 
Probably no man has been taken from among the living 
who was a more loyal and enthusiastic Alumnus. The 
Alumni of the University sense a deep loss in the pass- 
ing of this eminent Alumnus. His Alma Mater was very 
near to his heart, and he gloried in its growth. 

In 1942, Mr. Hazen would have been a part of the 
celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Associa- 
tion he founded. Plans will go forward in an endeavor 
to make it the greatest reunion ever held to commem- 
orate the great work he started. 

The Alumni News feels at liberty to convey sin- 
cere condolences to loved ones Mr. Hazen has left be- 
hind, and we, too, have lost a true, loyal, and eminent 
Alumnus. 



Note — Because of unavoidable circumstances, the photographer 
spoiled all pictures taken of Alumni activities. This the News and 
Alumni regrets very much, as several pictures of historic value, 
never to be again, were lost. In particular was the one of Dr. 
Fletcher P. Veitch, '91, class representative for the flag-raising in 
honor of the Fiftieth Anniversary class. Others were of the Alumni 
luncheon, the unveiling of the late W^illard M. Hillegeist portrait, 
and also the picture of the prize cadet company in 188", pre- 
sented by R. Cator Woolford, '87, of Atlanta, Ga. 



DIGGS ELECTED VICE-PRESIDENT 

(Continued horn Page 7) the Western Maryland Dairy 
in Baltimore. K. E. Smith, '16, president of the Com- 
mercial Seed Company of Baltimore. Miss Gertrude 
Chesnut, '26 (now Mrs. Kalec) is a resident of Hyatts- 
ville and employed in the Transradio Press Service. Miss 
Martha Ross Temple, '31, is with Station WFBR in 
Baltimore, specializing in Home Economics broadcast- 
ing. Both arc Representatives of the College of Home 
Economics. Elwood Armstrong, '26, is a graduate of the 
Commerce Course given in 1922-26 in the Baltimore 
schools. He is a Certified Public Accountant and takes 
an active interest in Alumni affairs. He resides in Balti- 
more. Jerome Hardy, '39, the youngest member on the 
Board, is from Silver Spring, Maryland. Both represent 
the College of Commerce. Men's Rcpresentatives-at- 
Large are C. V. Koons, '29, one who has had five years' 
experience on the Board, is an Engineering graduate and 
now a prominent lawyer. He is serving as chairman of 
the Alumni Board as provided under the new constitu- 
tion. Omar Crothers, '29, of Elkton, Maryland, is an 
Arts and Sciences graduate and now a practicing attorney 
in Cecil County. P. W. Chichester, '20, remains on the 
Board as provided bv the new constitution as immediate 
Past President, which gives the Board the benefit of his 
experience. 



10 



JULY — 1941 




COMING EVENTS 



-*& 



School 
Opens B 

SEPTEMBER 17th 

Football 

Season 

Opens 

SEPTEMBER 27th 



H, 




^5S 

CUT ON THIS LINE 



OCTOBER I 8 t h 
COLLEGE PARK 

Maryland 
vs. Florida 



FOOTBALL TEAM OF 1916 TO BE 
GUESTS OF HONOR 



MAKE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 1942 GOLDEN REUNION 



r~>\ 



ontribute To The TERRAPIN PARTY 



Fellow Alumni: 

I wish to be a contributing member of 
>he University of Maryland Alumni As- 
ociation, and am enclosing the usual 
mount of $2.00 for the year 1941-1942; 
if this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
pription to the Alumni News. 



TLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! 



Name _ Class Occupation 

Address 

Married? To whom ... Children 

Business address Title 




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Increase your smoking pleasure . .. Chesterfield's right 
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ALUMNI 
NEWS 



T3 

s 







AUGUST, 1941 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, AUGUST. 1941 



Number 



Alumni Association--University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 

OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robi ui M. Wat kins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Mil. 

Austin C. Diggs, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

C. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C Longridce, '29 Education 

). M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28. . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 
.Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2. (JO. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 



E 



GROUP LEADERS 
Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 



ALLEGANY COUNTY 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; 

Secretary. Frederick. Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 3: 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia. I'a. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop. '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 
James W. Stevens, '19 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

M. It. Stevens, '27 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 



Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Mr.-.. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

Mary Fisher, 

Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 



REPRESENTATIVES 



A. K. Besley, '23 

II. li. Shipley, '14 

Stewart McCaw, '35.. 
E. E. Powell, '1 

Geary Eppley, '18 

L. E, Bopst, '16 
Jim Kf.iioe, '40. 



Baseball 

Basket Ball 

Boxing 

Lacrosse 

Track 

Tennis 

..Cross Country 



Lewis W. Thomas, '28 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 
M. M. Clark, '22 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, 
James M. Swartz '19 
H. R. Devilbliss, '11 
E. F. Zalsak, '25 



'04 



Football 

At Large 



COVER PICTURE 

Another drawing by O. R. Car- 
rington, '28, faculty advisor for the 
Terrapin, student year book, of the 
new Arts and Sciences Building. 
This building faces north and is di- 
reetlv in rear of the old Engineering 
Building. Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08, 
is Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

Vacation time is here and we are 
all hunting a cool spot and relaxa- 
tion from our work and worries. Not 
so "On the Hill." There everything 
is hustle and go in preparation for 
work when the fall term opens. I 
sometimes wonder if we, who are 
out and busy with our own affairs, 
ever give a thought to the amount 
of work, the numerous details that 
have to be pushed to a successful 
conclusion by the various coaches 
so that we, after enjoying a couple 
of hours' entertainment at a foot- 
ball, baseball, lacrosse, track meet or 
other athletic event may come away 
with smiling faces and proud hearts, 
because another Maryland team has 
proved its prowess on the field of 
athletic conflict. We pat each other 
on the back and gloat over Mary- 
land's success. On the other hand, 
when the tide is out and victories 
flee, how many are around to boost 
the morale of those same athletes 
who are giving their all. win or lose, 
and who need our support and en- 
couragement far more when they 
are on the short end. Yes, we are 
out and have our places in the out- 
side world but as true Marvland 
men, we have a part to play in each 
year of Maryland's life just as truly 



AUGUST — 1941 

as though \vc were in there carrying the ball or taking 
our cuts. 

Think it oxer now and prepare to carry your indi- 
vidual share of the burden, determine to put and keep 
the old school on the crest year after year. 

It occurs to me that more interest in each other, Marj 
land and the world in general, would he engendered 
by meetings, more frequent meetings, of the various 
Alumni school groups and of the other groups scattered 
throughout the State. Interest in each other will stim- 
ulate interest in the object which brings us together — 
Maryland. 

There are always to be had for the asking men who 
know what is going on "On the Hill" — movies of the 
activities and with both will come a rejuvenation of the 
old Maryland Spirit. 

There is a phase of life which is attracting the atten- 
tion of all the world at the present time — the Military. 

How many old grads know how well the men of 
Maryland's R. O. T. C. stand among Uncle Sam's boys? 
Each year a goodly number go into the various branches 
of service as Commissioned Officers and through all 
the branches of service we see familiar names with Gen- 
eral, Colonel, Major and Captain prefixed. These men 
are proving the worth of the training received as under- 
graduates and are impressing the powers so well with 
their efficiency that even now a beautiful and fully 
equipped new armory is being started to enable our boys 
to have an even fuller and more complete training along 
the military lines. 

Already indications are that Maryland will have an 
increase in its enrollment this fall, thereby putting an 
even greater number of men under our guidance to be 
taught the principles of life as practiced by University 
of Maryland men. Let us each take up our share of the 
burden so that when they become one of us, after their 
four years of work, we will all be proud of them and 
the world will recognize them from their sterling quali- 
ties as practiced and lived by men from Maryland Uni- 
versity. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Qesten&l SiloeAte/i 



B\ recent ap- 
pointment, I jnd- 
saj McD. Silves- 

tcr, '11. now is a 
Brigadier Gen 
eral in the U. S. 
Army, lie lias 
previously been 
stationed at Fort 
Knox, Kentucky, 
on tank duty. 
His visit to the 
University was 
but for a few 
minutes while 
enroute on an 
inspection trip 
to Fort Meade, 
Aberdeen, and 
Fort Benning. 

General Silvester is one of Maryland's outstanding 
graduates who has distinguished himself in military 
service. He is a veteran of World War No. 1, where Ins 
capable leadership under combat received commenda- 
tion. He is a Past President of the "M" Club and former 
general chairman of the University's 1 30th Charter Day 
Celebration. His interest in his Alma Mater and Alumi. : 
affairs ranks among the ideal. 




Married — Miss Virginia Smith, '39, and Joe Murphy, '41. 
were married in July. Joe is the fleet footed halfback of gridiron 
fame. 

O O O 

Mexico — "Hello, Alumni," writes Mary Taylor fuller. '36, 
from Mexico City while on a tour of Mexico. Her chief rcuicl 
was that she missed Homecoming last fall but here's hoping 
for this year. 

• • • 



COL. GILLEM PROMOTED 



Western Union — Eileen Denny, '35, is personnel service rep- 
resentative for Western Union in Washington, D. C. 
OOO 

Married — Miss Marguerite Susan Stevenson, '39, a member 
of Tri Delt, married Mr. Dwight H. Vorkoeper of Washington, 
July 25th. The newlyvveds are living on Riggs Road in Prince 
George's County. 

O O 

Cavalry — By reason of a recent campus visit we learned that 
George B. Morse, '13, has been called to duty with the rank of 
Major in the U. S. Cavalry. 



It will be glad news to many who were in the II. (). 
T. C. from 1930 to 1934 to' know that their Com- 
mandant at that time now is Major General Alvan 
C. Gillem. He has been at Fort Benning Infantry School 
for some time, but it is understood that he has been 
transferred to Fort Polk, Louisiana. 

General Gillem's genial personality and capable lead 
ership was destined to elevate him to high ranks. He 
frequently returns to College Park and the campus — a 
place, he said, that "seems like home to me." 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



it is Glenn Wilson, class of 1928. who has become 
.1 hermit of Straitsmouth Island, near Rockport, Mass. 
Wilson has some 500 Belgian hares as his companions, 
who roam over the island without thought of any hu- 
man beings. 

Tins is something of a hobby with Glenn whose real 
job is a writer of economic subjects for the Atlantic 
Utilities Service Corporation in Manhattan. 

\n a side hue he writes short plays for radio broad- 
casting, having thus far sold four of these works. Among 
them were "Circus Conies Tuesday" and "Forever and 
a Day.'' His ambition is to make literature a full-time 
occupation when he finds that what he writes can 
command a livable wage and, he adds, "if ever." 

Sailing 

He is nautically minded and for several seasons sailed 
his 47-foot vawl Saga, a 35-year-old craft, up and down 
the coast spotting small islands, many of which at- 
tracted him. That is how he got the yen to obtain an 
island home, but he wanted an island which was handy 
to the mainland so he would not forget the old home 
ties. 

Straitsmouth Island came into view and when he first 
bid for it a couple of years ago the price was unsatisfac- 
tory to Uncle Sam. This time, however, he was high 
bidder and Uncle Sam decided in his favor. He has no 
idea of renaming the island because he says he likes the 
present name as being poetical and descriptive. 

Vacation Land 

He is amused by the fact that on this barren stretch 
where only rabbits frolic the house in which he resides 
boasts steam heat yet has to depend on cistern water. 
Of course he has to transport his drinking water over 
to the island. Lanterns and kerosene lamps make up for 
the loss of the gay White Way of Broadway, his usual 
stamping grounds. 

Wilson has no idea of doing any writing there for he 
is strictly vacation-minded. He realizes how lonely the 
place can be when night shuts down, but it was what he 
wanted, a plot of land all his own, away from the hustle 
and bustle, with the solace that comes only from soli- 
tude. 

(Note — This article was sent in by Professor Foley 
of the Dental School. It appeared in the Gloucester, 
Mass., Daily Times.) 



Married — Miss Florence Elaine Danforth, '40, a member of 

Kappa Delta, and former cheerleader, and Robert Harmon, '41, 

were married July 26 in Baltimore. Elaine's sister, Dorotby, is a 
graduate of the Nurses' School of 1940. 



BAUMGARTNER HEADS 
GARRETT COUNTY GROUP 



kland, 



Under the auspices of a group of Alumni in Oakl. 
\ld.. led by Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, MD., '31, a 
special Uniyersity of Maryland program was presented 
before the Rotary Club. 

Dr. Reuben Steinmeyer, professor of Political Sci- 
ence, spoke and Prof. Harlan Randall, professor of Mu- 
sic, rendered vocal selections, among which were sev- 
eral school songs. All Alumni in Garrett County were 
invited to join with the Rotary' for this meeting. Follow- 
ing the Rotary meeting those Alumni present held a 
short meeting to effect a county organization. Dr. Baum- 
gartner was elected president; Thurl W. Power, '32, 
was elected vice-president; Miss Katherine Stevenson 
Helbig, '32, was made seoretary. Others present were 
Wayne Hamilton, '39, Miss Virginia Bolden, '41, E. 
Ray Jones, '13, Neal Fraley, '16, LL.B., Dr. W. W. 
Grant, D.D.S., and Dr. Ben S. Selby, D.D.S. 

The group plans to sponsor other University programs 
for service clubs in their county as a means of more 
closely uniting the Alumni as well as bringing the Uni- 
versity closer to the people. 



CAPT. CRAPSTER, '96, SUCCUMBS 

Capt. Thaddeus Greaves Crapster, '96, until recently 
commander of the Coast Guard District of Norfolk, 
Va., died at the Marine Hospital following a short ill- 
ness. Interment with full honors was held in Arlington 
National Cemetery. 

A native of Frederick County, Captain Crapster en- 
tered the service soon after graduation and became an 
ensign in 1904. He served in the Naw during the World 
War and had had 17 years of special sea duty when ap- 
pointed Captain in command of the Norfolk District in 
1930. He would have been eligible for retirement this 
fall with the rank of Rear Admiral. 



Army — F. R. Lodge, '37, now is a corporal in the U. S. Army 
at Little Rock, Arkansas. Lodge, a Sigma Nu, was formerly with 
the North Western Telephone Company at Omaha, Nebraska, 
o o o 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Harold Porter announce the arrival of 
John Toulson, born July 1 last. Mrs. Porter was formerly Miss 
Isabella Toulson, '32. The Porters live in Salisbury, Md. 
O o 

Married — Miss Gertrude Vorhees Chesnut, '26, a member of 
Alpha Omicron Pi, married Mr. George L. Kalee on June 24 last 
at Hagcrstown, Md. The newlyweds will reside in Hyattsville, Md. 
Mrs. Kalee is a member of the Alumni Board, representing the 
College of Home Economics. 



Army — Frank Davis, '40, now is in the army. 






J\latix^ud AiSipxvit 




OHN GROVES 

CLASS 1924 

MANAGER 



The National Airport, located on the Mount Vernon 
Memorial Highway, stands on the threshold of the Na- 
tion's Capital. It is one of the world's finest commer- 
cial airports and is almost within the shadow of the 
Washington Monument. Manager of this airport is 
none other than John Groves, '24, one of the Terra- 
pins' outstanding gridiron heroes of bygone days. 

John came from Western High School in Washing- 
ton, D. C, unheralded as a football star but with a 
desire to be a master at the game. He became great as a 
punter, quarterback and drop-kicker. It was John who 
placed the pigskin between the upright in Franklin 
Field in 1923 when Maryland defeated Penn, 3 to 0. 
It was John who, in the same year, was the prominent 
figure in the Yale game when Yale, the mythical col- 
legiate champions, eked out a narrow 16-14 victory 
over the Terps. A forward-passing combination of Mc- 
Quade to Groves was the sting for main gridiron elev- 
ens in that year. 

Marines 

Following graduation John entered the U. S. Marine 
Corp Air Service. After a short term of aviation service 
he resigned his commission and entered the air service 



of the Department of Commerce on National Airways. 
While commercial air service was growing so was John 
in his knowledge of airports and airways. He procured 
and issued information regarding obstacles, approaches 
and facilities of airports for pilots' use. 

When the Civil Aeronautics Authority, now the Civil 
Aeronautic Administration, was organized John became 
assistant chief in charge of educational institutions. His 
Alma Mater became one of the first to put in the course. 
In the last two years 169 students have completed the 
primary course and received their private pilot licenses. 
Merrick, '13, Engineer 

In view of his airport and airway experience John 
Groves was the logical choice to become manager of one 
of the "world's finest airports." No airport in the world 
close to a populous center is freer of approach obstruc- 
tion than is the National Airport. From the end of each 
runway in eight directions planes can rise as gradually 
as one foot in 40. The bulk of the proposed landing 
area was under water. The first task in construction was 
to throw up dikes, then clear the runway locations of 
silt in order to get a sand and gravel base. Then more 
sand and gravel was pumped (Continued on Page 6) 









It/arid ffiom &i*i<fOfU)A& 

Word has been received from Preston L. Peach, '03, 
who is a school superintendent in the Federated Malaya 
State in the Far East, near Singapore. He is among 
the early contributors each year to the Terrapin Party. 

He writes briefly of the conditions there last May. 
"By the time you get this Malaya may be a battlefield. 
We arc living on the edge of something. However, 
there is no lack of preparation. Whoever tries to enter 
this land in any but a friendly way will certainly get a 
hot reception. But we civilians will probably feel the 
misery of modern air warfare which seems to be the 
fashionable way nowadays. We are hoping sincerely 
that this lovely country will not be disturbed. 

Mrs. Peach and I expect to be back in the States 
in 1943 . . . and I am personally looking forward to 
the 40th anniversary reunion of my class if all goes well 



here. Best regards to all. 



NATIONAL AIRPORT 



Preston L. Peach, '03." 



(Continued trom Page 5) in on top of sand and 

gravel to eliminate the danger of settling or uneven sur- 
faces on the runways. All this took approximately 13 
months and finally the sluices were opened and the en- 
tire area soon appeared as dry ground. Every type of 
earth-moving machinery then went to work to bring the 
runways down to level, to spread and terrace the grade. 
Here another Marylander figured prominently in the 
construction of the airport. Zeke Merrick, '13, was su- 
pervising engineer on the project. 

Colonial Design 

The buildings are of colonial design to conform with 
the spirit of the classic architecture of the National 
Capitol and its surroundings. The result is a massive 
building necessary to house all of the facilities required 
by a modern airport. 

The field side of the waiting room is a huge wall of 
glass overlooking the field, and outside this window 
the Mount Vernon motif is repeated in eight more slen- 
der columns. These are flanked with curving prome- 
nades on two levels, and the whole facade rests upon 
a wall of architectural concrete in which glass is liber- 
ally used. The traveller is impressed by the hugeness 
of the waiting room, yet the facilities are convenient 
and comfortable for the air-travelling public. A spacious 
and modern dining room is located on the second floor 
accommodating nearly 350 diners. 

200 Planes Daily 

Approximately 200 planes go and come daily at the 
airport. These planes are directed by means of a new 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 

JUDGE J. B. GRAY, JR., '14 

Governor Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, LL.B., has ap- 
pointed John B. Gray, Jr., '14, of Prince Frederick, 
Maryland, Associate Judge of the Seventh Judicial Cir- 
cuit which is composed of Prince Georges, Charles, 
Calvert and St. Mary's Counties. Judge Grav succeeds 
Judge Ogle Marbury, '14, LL.B., who has been made 
Chief Judge of the Circuit. 

Judge Gray is more familiarly known bv his classmates 
as Johnnie and the student yearbook labeled him a "chip 
off the old block." This is quite appropo as he is the son 
of the late J. B. Gray, '75, who was one of Southern 
Maryland's most eminent citizens and his son is cer- 
tainly stepping along in his father's footsteps. 

When Judge Gray finished college he was class orator 
and valedictorian of his class. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1916 and since then has been a practicing attor- 
ney in Maryland. He has always been active in Alumni 
affairs and served as president of the "M" Club of the 
University. 

Governor O'Conor in making the appointment said, 
"Mr. Gray was recommended strongly by the Maw- 
land State Bar Association as eminently qualified to fill 
the judicial post." Judge Gray has served his State as 
Assistant Attorney General, was a member of the com- 
mittee on revision of rules for the Court of Appeals, 
served on the Water Front Commission, is counsel for 
the Board of County Commissioners of Calvert County, 
and is a member of the American and Maryland Bar 
Association. 

Judge Gray was born and raised in Calvert County 
and it might well be said that the home town boy makes 

good at home. 

• • • 

Married — Miss Tempe Curry, '40, a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, and Mr. James Grant, '39, a member of Phi Delta Theta, 
were married July 12 last. Mrs. Grant is a former "Miss Mary- 
land" which is sponsored by the student yearbook, the Terrapin. 
The newlyweds reside in Washington. 
OOO 

Visitors — -Lieut, and Mrs. Robert W. Slye paid the campus 
a visit this month while on leave. Bob, '36, the former Terrapin 
hurdler of past years is a lieutenant in the Naval Aviation, and is 
now doing instruction duty at Pensacola, Fla. 



automatic flight progress board, thus giving the men 
who direct and control sky traffic a complete picture of 
the traffic every second along the airways in the Wash- 
ington Control Area. 

The National Airport, lying as it does along the beau- 
tiful Mount Vernon Boulevard, assumes the character 
of a beauty spot. 

It can well be said that John Groves is number one 
manager of the world's number one airport. 






AUGUST — 1941 



by Harold Benjamin 
Dean, College oi Education 

The teaching of international good will. Friendship, 
and understanding is a very hard job. It is a task at 
which many peoples have failed in the past. Certainly 
the present drumming of the guns and crash of the 
bombs in Europe, Asia, and Africa tell us quite pre- 
cisely how difficult is the teaching of sanity in a world 
of madmen. In the Western Hemisphere, however, we 
are still determined to perform this difficult task for our 
American peoples. These Americans, from Nome to 
La Plata, from Point Barrow to Punta Arenas, in the 
four centuries since white men first occupied the New 
World, have done a good many hard jobs against tre- 
mendous obstacles. They believe that they can do the 
same thing again and again. They maintain that they can 
develop an inter-American understanding which will 
weather the storms of international violence better than 
anything Europe has thus far produced. 

Mutual Help 

Success in this enterprise will have very practical ef- 
fects. The American peoples will have more and better 
food to eat if they can carry this hard job to comple- 
tion. They will be able to wear better clothes and to 
live in better houses. They will be cursed by fewer days 
of sickness and idleness. Most impressive of all, they 
will be able to enjoy their freedom from hunger and 
cold, from poverty and disease, without being haunted 
by the specter of war. 

These are very definite and concrete results. They are 
as real as the whine of a steel-jacketed bullet, the weak- 
ness of starvation, or the deadly flame of yellow fever. 
Definite, concrete, practical as they are, however, thev 
are produced more effectively by impractical-seeming 
measures than by those which at first glance would ap- 
pear to be common-sense devices for attaining obvious 
goals. 

Education 

This is the one chief impression I have gained from 
my observations of our American countries. It has grown 
on me from my first contact with American nations 
outside the United States almost thirty years ago to my 
last visit to South America during the late winter and 
spring of the present year. A Latin-American revolu- 
tion is something much more than rifles and planes and 
gunboats. It is also a vision of new ways for a people. 



Chemists Will Meet In Atlantic City 

When the American Chemical Society meets in \t 
lantic City Septembei 7th to the 12th Maryland ra< ultj 
.nul Minimi will hold a luncheon meeting al the Marl 
borough-Blenheim Hotel on Tuesday, Septembei 8th, 
Campus representatives will be Dr. I.. B. Broughton, 
'08; Dr. c:. E. White. '23; Dr. \\ . J. Svirbely; Dr. \1 
M. Herring; Dr. M. I.. Drake, and Di I. \\ K 
Approximately fifty others are expected to be present. 



Visitors — Lieut, and Mis John Simpson, 'ss and '36, and the n 

8 month old son. Robert Bamesley, visited (Ik- i ampus list month 
John, tin- formei stellar guard tor the Terp eleven, now is in the 
U. S. \ini\ \ir Corps. lie has been stationed in Hawaii and hi. 
been transferred to Barksdale, I.a. Mrs. Simpson, formerly June 
Bamesley, was one of Man-land's outstanding ^irl cheerleaders 
That's why John played so well 

O o 

Visitor — Dr. John V. Moore, '23, a fonnei gridiron star. \ is 
ited the campus. Dr. Moore is with the U. S. Veterans Bureau 

in St. Louis, Mo. 

OOO 

Theology — Julius Emory Ackerman, '37, College of Com 
merce, now is in his second year at the Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa. 



Married — Miss Ruth Richmond, '40, and Lieut. James K. 
Chenault were married June 21 last. Mrs. Chenault is a member 
of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Lieut. Chenault is in the Army and 
stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 



An international conflict of economic interests is not 
merely a matter of money, credit, beef, cotton, or coffee. 
It is always tied to some dream of a better life for certain 
groups of men, women, and cbildrcn. Tbe greatest war 
which our nations or any nations can ever be involved 
is neither military nor economic; it is the war for the 
control of men's minds and hearts. That war can be won 
only by the right kind of purposeful education. 

Progressing 

The time may soon come when the Western Hemis- 
phere will have to be defended with arms of steel and 
high explosive, but in the long run those arms will be 
useless unless they are supported by as great and as un- 
selfish an education of school, press, radio, pictures, and 
all the other modern instruments for learning to know 
and feel what a people need as our intelligence and 
imagination can devise. 

In country after country of the Western Hemisphere, 
some of the most impressive educational advances the 
world has ever seen are now taking place. Give the 
peoples of the three Americas a little more time and 
they will win the greatest of all wars bv developing the 
educational means for achieving truly civilized purposes. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Football Outlook Is Much Brighter Than Last Year 
With Sophomores Playing Important Roles 



Forty-five Maryland football aspirants were asked to 
report at College Park September 2d for the start of 
practice, with the outlook fairly bright if there aren't 
too many additional losses. 

Dr. John E. (Jack) Faber, acting Athletic Director 
and head of the Alumni coaching group that includes Al 
Heagy and Al Woods, issued the call and he and his 
associates were to be on the job when the Terps 
gathered. 

Maryland's squad appears potentially stronger than 
the one that got off on the wrong foot in the opener 
last season. There are 15 letter men among the 22 left- 
overs and some unusually fine material in the ranks of 
the 25 sophs who have been invited to don suits. 
13 In All Are Lost 

Nine letter men were lost by graduation but with the 
exception of Bob Smith, the great center, and Joe 
Murphy, the fleet-running back and kicker, the losses 
should not be keenly felt. 

There also were four other losses after Spring practice 
with Don Shockey, who had been shifted to tackle from 
halfback, as the only letter man among the quartet. 
Others were Warren O'Neill, a reserve tackle; Lohr 
Dunlap, a fine guard who also was an ace shotputter, and 
Austin Frey, rated as the best Frosh lineman last Fall. 
Shockey, who apparently had found the right spot at 
tackle, will be missed the most. 

With the exception of ends, Maryland has a good 
nucleus of letter men for all positions, and the soph 
wing material should provide gridders who'll better 
the performance of the vets last year. 

Ends Are Tall Timber 

Jack Gilmore, shifted to end from the backfield, is 
the only letter wingman, but Sophs Bob James, George 
Simler, Lou Hesson, Kenneth Daniels, Dick Alexander 
and John Clayland offer unusual talent. They have the 
height and weight, with Gilmore being the shortest and 
lightest at 6 feet 1 and 172 pounds. Daniels, 6 feet 5, 
and around 200, is the biggest. 

Ralph Burlin, Maryland's best lineman last season; 
Rcggy Vincent and Luther Conrad give three lctterman 
tackles, although the latter two are under 190. Jack Ditt- 
mar, a 187-pound Soph, appears as the only promising 
recruit. 

Four letter men are available for the guard jobs, Jack 
Morton, Frank I lever and Max Hunt, Seniors, and Har- 



old Berry, Junior, who was shifted to the line after win- 
ning his letter as a blocking back last Fall. They will 
have to carry the load as the Soph material is far from 
developed. 

George Jarmoska, letter reserve to Smith last Fall, 
and Pop Wharton, who won his insignia in 1939 but 
was kept out last Fall by illness, are the vet centers. 
They have a promising supporter in Bill Taylor, a spir- 
ited Soph. All are light, none reaching 180 and Whar- 
ton hitting around 160. 

Plenty Of Backfield Talent 

Mearle DuVall, triple-threat general; Elmer Rigby, 
fleet runner and southpaw passer; Bernie Ulman, a 
clever ball handler; John Cordyack, light but effective 
blocking and defensive back, and Joe Hoopengardner, 
a sturdy little fellow, are the letter-wearing ball toters, 
and they will get the most promising Soph companv 
that has come up in years. 

Included in the rookie array are Jack Wright, a 205- 
pound Baltimorean, who is crashing fullback, can pass 
a ball like a bullet; Tommy Mont, a triple-threat young- 
ster from Cumberland; Jack Brenner, an adept passer 
and runner; George Barnes, a fast, husky and slipperv 
ball toter from the Nation's Capital; Ed Chovanes, 
blocker and line backer-up, and Bill Helboch, versatile 
but particularly able on defense. 

Jack Mier, ineligible last year, and Lou Chacos, a 
junior who was a sprinter on the track team last Spring, 
also should help. 

Kicker Is Greatest Need 

There are a few others who may develop and prove 
bulwarks but those mentioned— if all of them get back 
—doubtless will play most of the football. They seem to 
provide better than usual Maryland talent with the de- 
velopment of a kicker looming as the biggest job for 
the mentors. Mont may be the main booter. 

Maryland's schedule, as usual, is tough, with Duke. 
Penn and Georgetown as the powerhouses to be op- 
posed. Here is the complete list: 

September 27 — Hampden-Sydney. 

October 3 (Friday Night) — Western Maryland in Baltimore 

Stadium. 
October 11 — Duke in Baltimore Stadium. 
October 18 (Homecoming)- — Florida. 
October 25 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. 
November 1 — Rutgers at New Brunswick. 
November 8 — Georgetown at Washington. 
November 15 — V. M. I. 
November 20 (Thanksgiving) — Washington and Lee in Bal 

timore Stadium. 



8 



AUGUST 



1941 





MARYLAND'S 


TENTATIVE 


1941 FOOTBALL SOI 


IAD 










FROM 19.0 SQUAD 






Name 


Pos. 


\ 


\\t 


1 Is. ()l 

lit. Squad 


Si himl 




1 lom< 


Larrj MacKenzie 


E 


21 


177 


6 1 


3 


Foresl Park 




B.lltllll'IK 


"Jack Gilmore 


E 


20 


172 


(» 1 


2 


rech 




\\ 1 ihington I 1 


•Ralph Burlin 


T 


23 


197 


6 I 


3 


I omi 




Porl Depo il Md 


•Reginald Vincent 


1 


21 


188 


6 I 


j 


\\ esl Nottingham 


(Md | 


1 tulltnwil. \ ) 


Frank Maxson 


T 


21) 


L87 


5.9 


2 


Pingrj 




Cranford. N 1 


•Luther Conrad 


T 


2d 


188 


(. 


1 


\\ esl Nottingham 


(Md 


HoUidaysourg. Pa 


'John Morton 


G 


21 


199 


5 hi 


3 


Roxborough 1 Pa. ) 




\lt \n \|.| 


'Max Ihiiil 


c; 


21 


L88 


5 In 


3 


1 OW.IIkl.l 




\\ ysox, Pa 


Frank Heyer 


G 


21 


174 


5 11 


3 


\h 1 )onogh 




Baltimon 


1 Limkl Berry 


G 


20 


193 


6 


2 


rech 




Washington, 1) I 


•George Jarmoska 


c 


21 


174 


3 11 


2 


1 )ickinson Sem 




[erse] Stion . Pa 


tjim Wharton 


c 


23 


163 


6 


2 


Foresl Park 




Baltimore 


•Mcarlc DuVall 


B 


21 


173 


5-11 


3 


\it. St. Joe 




Baltimore 


"John Cordyack 


B 


23 


168 


6 


3 


Osceola Mills (Pa 




Baltimore 


•Bcrnie Ulman 


B 


23 


172 


6-1 


3 


Foresl Park 




Baltim 


•Elmer Rigby 


B 


21 


170 


5-11 


2 


Foresl Park 




Baltimore 


•Joe Iloopcngardner 


B 


20 


162 


5-8 


2 


1 1 igerstown 




1 lagerstown, Md 


Jim Dunn 


B 


20 


loO 


5-10 


3 


Staunton M. A V 1 


Washington, 1) ('- 


Ramon Grelecki 


B 


21 


160 


5.9 


2 


Citj College 




Baltimore 


Louis Chacos 


B 


22 


173 


511 


-> 


Central 




\\ ashington, D. (.' 


Herb Gunther 


B 


22 


174 


5-11 


2 


Poh 




Baltimore 


Jack Mier 


B 


21 


\~*0 


5-10 


1 


Valley Forge 




Monessen, Pa 


* Letter men. 


t Letter man in 1939 bi 


t did not play in 1940. 
















FROM 1940 FRESHMAN SQUAD 






Name 


Pos. 


Age 


Wt. 


Ht. 




High School 




I lome 


Louis Hesson 


E 


21 


170 


6-2 




City College 




Baltimore. Md 


George Simler 


E 


20 


195 


6-2 




Femdale 

(Attended Bull 


s School, 


Johnstown, Pa. 
Washington, D. C. 


Richard Alexander 


E 


21 


175 


6-2 




West Nottingham 


(Md.) 


Laurel Springs. N. J 


Kenneth Daniels 


E 


19 


190 


6-5 




Hagerstown 




Hagerstown, Md. 


John Clayland 


E 


20 


170 


6-3 




Bates (Calif.) 




Baltimore 


Robert James 


E 


20 


182 


6-1 1/2 




John Harris 




Harrisburg, Pa. 


Jack Dittmar 


I 


19 


187 


5-111/2 




Forest Park 




Baltimore 


Arthur Birnbaum 


T 


19 


220 


6-1 Vz 




Forest Park 




Baltimore 


James Fitzgerald 


T 


19 


220 


6-1 




Gonzaga (D. C.) 




Silver Spring, Md. 


Eugene Baldi 


T 


19 


175 


6-1 




Central 




Washington. D. C. 


George Miller 


G 


21 


190 


5-7 




Femdale 




Johnstown, Pa. 


Tony Nardo 


G 


20 


184 


5-6 




City College 




Baltimore 


George Couch 


G 


19 


224 


6-2 




Central 




Washington, D. C. 


Elwood Armacost 


G 


19 


180 


6 




Franklin 




Reisterstown, Md. 


Preston Taylor 


c 


19 


176 


5-11 Vz 




McDonogh 




Baltimore 


Tom Mont 


B 


19 


177 


6 




Allegany 




Cumberland, Md. 


George Barnes 


B 


20 


190 


5-10 




Western 




Washington, D. C. 


Jack Wright 


B 


21 


206 


5-10J/2 




City College 




Baltimore 


Edward Chovanes 


B 


20 


184 


5-8^2 




Hazleton 




I lazleton, Pa. 


Hobart Hines 


B 


20 


185 


6-1 Vz 




Bridgeton 




Bridgeton, \. J. 


John Brenner 


B 


21 


173 


5-11 




Holhdaysburg 
New Rochelle 




Hollidaysburg, Pa. 


William Helboch 


B 


20 


170 


5-8 Vz 






New Rochelle. N Y 


Bill Taylor 


B 


18 


160 


5-10 




Ridgely 




Ridgely. Md. 



(Note: Ages are of this Fall. Gilmore and Berry played backfield in 1940.) 

Joint Coaches: John E. (Jack) Faber, Albert B. Heagy and Albert W. Woods, all Maryland graduates who have positions on the 
staff of the University. 

RULE CHANGES ARE LIKED BY TERP COACHES 



Maryland's coaches like the 1941 football rule 
changes. They believe allowing the ball to be passed 
forward from directly behind the line will help the 
Terp offense, a mixture of the single and double wing 
back. 

Free substitution of players also will aid such squads 
as Maryland's which have a limited supply of gridders. 

In fact, the offense was heavily emphasized in the 
three main changes made by the National Collegiate 
Football Rules Committee. 

Most radical departure is the statute allowing the ball 
to be handed forward at any point behind the line of 
scrimmage to any player; it will be treated as though 
it were a backward pass (this rule makes every player 



a potential ball carrier, and makes possibilities for de- 
ception almost unlimited). 

The substitution rule provides that plavers may be 
substituted as many times as desired during a game. It 
eliminated the provision which previously prohibited 
a substitute from communicating with his team until 
the ball had been put in play. 

In the third big change, fourth down passes which 
become incomplete in the opponent's end-zone will be 
treated as though they became incomplete on the field 
of play instead of being ruled as touchbacks. On such 
plays, the ball will go to the defending team at the point 
where the ball was put into play instead of the 20-yard 
line, as in the past. 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



GRAPEVINE 
NEWS 

about those we know 



Pensacola — Cadet Hennie Evans, '39, now is a student in the 
Navy Aviation School at Pensacola, Fla. 



Married — Miss Peggy Smaltz, '40, a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, and Mr. Horace Lowe were married this past spring. 
They now are living in New York. 



Engaged — Miss Dorothea Wailes, '40, Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
and Mr. James Kemper, '41, a member of Theta Chi, have an- 
nounced their engagement. 



Baseball — Louis (Bozey) Berger, '35, former Terp star, has 
been transferred to Seattle of the Pacific Coast League by the 
Newark Baseball Club. Berger was with Kansas City on option. 



Married — Miss Martha Elizabeth Carter of Weldon, N. C, and 
Lieut. John Badenhoop, '40, a member of Kappa Alpha, were 
married July 5 last. Mrs. Badenhoop attended Meredith College 
in North Carolina. Lieut. Badenhoop is at present stationed at 
Fort George G. Meade with the Ninety- third Anti-Tank Battalion. 



Navy — C. Markland Kelly, Jr., '43, has completed an intensive 
eight months' aviation course and has received his wings and a 
commission as Ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserves. He has been 
assigned to an aircraft carrier at Norfolk, Va. 



Aviation — Wright Field, at Dayton, Ohio, has the services 
of Reuben Wolk, '38, an engineering grad who is testing aircraft 
engines. Other grads who are with the Wright Field are William 
R. Kenny, '30, and Phillip M. Taswell, '39. 



Birth — Lieut. C. Temple Thomason, '35, U. S. A., and Mrs. 
Thomason announce the birth of a daughter, Joan Temple, on July 
22nd. Mrs. Thomason, the former Kitty Dennis, '34, and a mem- 
ber of Kappa Kappa Gamma, was a teacher at Stuart Junior High 
School in Washington. Temple, a member of Theta Chi, is at- 
tached to the Building and Grounds Division as a lieutenant in 
the Army Air Corps. They reside at 715 Van Buren St., N.W., 
in Washington. 

O O O 

Seed Man — When you see a sign that says Certified Tomato 
Seed look twice for the name Otis Twilley, '21, a professional 
grower of wilt-resisting tomato seed. In addition to growing to- 
mato seed Otis teaches Vocational Agriculture at the Wicomico 
High School in Salisbury. The Gulf States and the Tri-States are 
the biggest users of Twilley 's seeds. 



Florida — The former Miss Ruth Diggs, '32, now Mrs. Alex. 
L. Webb, is residing in Coral Gables, Florida. 



Military — Lieut. John Logan Schutz, '38, formerly with the 
Twelfth Infantry. Arlington Cantonment, now is a full commis- 
sioned officer in the U. S. Army and is stationed at Fort Jackson, 
South Carolina. 

O O 

Terrapin Party — Among the early responders to the call of the 
Terrapin Party we find Richard Kline, '33, of Frederick, Md., first. 
Sharing some of the first honors are John P. Mallery, '16, of San 
Francisco, Calif.; Miss Catherine Freeman, '34, a Baltimore school 
teacher; George M. Merrill, '20, landscape architect from St. 
Louis, Mo., and L. L. Vincent, '32, of Westminster. Mass. 



Married — Franklin B. Wise, '35, joined the ranks of the bene- 
dicts June 28. He was married at Annapolis to Miss Mildred 
Phillips, of Barclay, Md. After a honeymoon trip to Nova Scotia, 
the couple returned to Laurel, where they will make their home. 
Mr. Wise, a member of A. T. O. fraternity, is a legislative rep- 
resentative for a group of dairying and agricultural interests. 



Press — William C. H. (Bill) Needham, former Diamondback 
editor and member of the class of '34, was transferred recently 
from Baltimore to the Washington bureau of the Associated Press. 



HEADQUARTERS 

for Good Times 

Cshe J^ora Jjaitirnore <j~toteL 

Convenient for Football Fans while fol- 
lowing the TERPS. 700 comfortable 
rooms, two restaurants, bar and luxurious 
Cocktail Lounge at your service. 

Maryland's Baltimore Games: 
October 3 (Nite Game) West. Md. 
October 1 1 Duke University 

Nov. 30 (Thanksgiving) Wash, and Lee 

Maryland's College Park games: 
September 27 Hampden Sydney 

October 1 8 Florida 

November 15 V. M. I. 

Ofn iaeal place to entertain 

(S^f $3 TO $6 SINGLE 

LORD BALTIMORE 

utoteL 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



10 



A 

SNAP 

FROM 

YESTERYEAR 




4^W Gall 

Make your plans early to attend all games. 

Three at College Park, three in Baltimore 
and one in Washington, Philadelphia and 
New Brunswick. 

DON'T FORGET HOMECOMING 



when we meet our arch Southern foe, the 
'Gators from Florida. 

Prices for all games at home and near home- 
are $1.10 and $1.65, except the opening 
game — 55 cents and $1.10. 
Write the Athletic Office, University of 
Maryland, College Park, for tickets; or your 
Alumni Office will convey your request 
for you. 



HOMECOMING, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18th — MARYLAND vs. FLORIDA 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



MAKE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 1942 GOLDEN REUNION 

Contribute To The TERRAPIN PARTY 



Fellow Alumni: 



TLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



1 wish to be a contributing member of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation, and am enclosing the usual 
(amount of $2.00 for the year 1941-1942; 
jOf this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
scription to the Alumni News. 



Name 



Class Occupation 



Married?^. To whom Children 

Business address Title 




Help yourself to a Chesterfield 

ind enjoy this Cooler, Milder, Belter-Tasting 
Cigarette . . . with its right combination of the 
worlds best cigarette tobaccos. 

So it's easy to see why these friendly 
white packages are around wherever folks are 
having a good time. 

Everywhere you go . . . 
-0? it's have a Chesterfield 





ALUMNI 
NEWS 



<jtomecomincj * Saturday, Uctober 10 




n 



u 



crv.. -"J ' a N 



SEPTEMBER, I94I 




HOMECOMING HIGHLIGHTS 

Homecoming Program 

Call All Terps 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSN. EXTENDS A WELCOME TO ALL ALUMNI 

FRIDAY NIGHT — 700 P. M. - - PEP RALLY 

10:00 A. M. — Registration. Rossborough Inn. 

Throughout the Day — Sightseeing. Campus. 

11:45 A.M. — Frosh-Soph Tug-o-War. Paint Branch. 



12:15 Noon — Class of '10, Luncheon. University Din- 
ing Hall. 

12:30 Noon — Class Luncheon of 1908. University Din- 
ing Hall. 

12 to 1 P. M. — University Dining Hall Cafeteria open 
to Alumni. 

1:00 P. M. — Judging of House Decorations. Fraterni- 
ties and Sororities. 



1:45 P.M. — Gateway Dedication, Class of '10. Near 

Rossborough Inn. 
2:30 P. M. — Football Game. Florida vs. Maryland. 

Byrd Stadium. 

Half-Time, Float Parade. Football Game. 

5:00 to 8:00 P. M. — Open House. Fraternities and 
Sororities. 

5:00 P.M. — "M" Club Meeting, Assembly Room, 
New Administration Building. 

5:30 to 6:30 P. M. — University Dining Hall Cafeteria 
open for Alumni. 

8:00 to 12:00 Midnight — Homecoming Dance. Gym- 
Armory. 



COME ONE, COME ALL — THE DAY IS YOURS! 





On Homecoming Day, one of the outstanding classes 
in the history of the University will present a new 
Campus Gateway to the University. This gateway is lo- 
cated near the historic Rossborough Inn. Congressman 
William P. Cole, Jr., president of the class, will make 
the presentation remarks and President H. C. Bvrd, '08, 
has been asked to accept on behalf of the University. 
The exercises will be held just prior to the football game. 

This is a most outstanding gesture by a class and 
should be an inspiration to all other classes in making 
contributions to their Alma Mater. As time rolls on the 
spirit of our University will be engendered bv the mem- 
ories surrounding the mementoes placed on the campus 
bv class spirit. Daily many students will pass through 
this gate and few will realize that following members 
of this class included men high in national life contrib- 
uted to an inspiring gesture for others to follow. 



I ld\ \\ ii i i wi P. Cole, )k. 
President 



GlaU afj 1910 
wilt psi&berit 
Qateutcuf, 



W. P. Cole, Jr., president, a cadet lieutenant, a for- 
mer baseball star and Senior Class orator; O. II. Saun- 
ders, secretary, cadet major and letter winner in football, 
baseball, track; A. C. "Ches" Adams, cadet captain and 
letter winner in football and track; Herschel II. Allen, 
a cadet captain and treasurer of the Athletic Associa- 
tion; \Y. Graham Cole, manager and player in lacrosse; 
John Donaldson, principal musician and bugler; John 
W. Duckctt, a cadet first lieutenant and social editor 
on year book; William J. Frere, a cadet second lieuten- 
ant and vice-president of Athletic Association; Jackson 
P. Grason, class president, drum major and baseball and 
track star; S. D. Day, a cadet first lieutenant and asso 
ciate editor on vcar book; George E. Hamilton, a cadet 
first lieutenant and adjutant and secretary of Athletic 
Association; T. Swann Harding, an editor on the \c.it 
book staff; Frank J. Maxwell, a cadet first lieutenant and 
quartermaster; Walter D. Munson, manager and star in 



Continued on /'age d I 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, SEPTEMBER, 1941 



Number 4 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

{Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Loncridce, '29 Education 

J. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Acnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . . .Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 
Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary. Frederick. Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger. '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON. D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons. '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



James W. Stevens, '19.. 
M. B. Stevens, '27 



President 

.... Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



A K. Besley, '23 
H. B. Shipley, '14 



Baseball 

Basket Ball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 - Boxing 

E. E. Powell, '13 Lacrosse 

Geary Eppley, '18 _ Track 

I. F. Bopst, '16 Tennis 

Jim Kehoe, '40 Cross Country 



Lewis W. Thomas, '28.__ 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 

M. M. Clark, '22 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 

James M. Swartz '19 

H. R. Devilbliss, '11 

E. F. Zalsak, '25 



Football 

..At Large 



COVER PICTURE 

A snapshot of a forward drive 
with the favorite pigskin under the 
arm of a Terp. The boys of this year's 
team have potential possibilities and 
will produce some good football. A 
slogan should be "Follow the 
Terps." No Alumnus should miss 
seeing these boys in action, especial- 
ly on Homecoming Day, when they 
meet the 'Gators from the Univer- 
sitv of Florida. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

September, and the leaves are 
turning — a little frosty in the morn- 
ings — and on even- side we hear 
of this and that boy and girl going 
away to school. Does it not bring 
back memories of the first time we 
climbed the hills? 

How many realize the difference 
in the Hill of the old days and the 
present time? Away back there we 
found five or six buildings and three 
hundred or so students. Now the 
Hill and more is covered with build- 
ings, with between three and four 
thousand students. This year, I un- 
derstand, Maryland is keeping up 
her record and there will be an even 
larger enrollment in the Freshman 
Class than last year. Among this 
vear's enrollment are more than six 
hundred graduate students. Surely 
recent graduates who are returning 
for post-graduate work and the world 
at large, as exemplified by the size of 
the student body, think well of our 
Alma Mater. Why should not we 
renew and continue our associations? 

This Year Homecoming Day on 
October 18th will afford a splendid 
opportunity for that purpose. Our 
(Continued on Page 6) 



SEPTEMBER — 1941 



For the nineteenth time in as man] years the Annual 

Homecoming of old grads will be the 1 lead Unci I )aj ol 
the Fall season. Saturday, October 18, is the time when 
every Alumni of the University should return to the 
campus and make the day a success for his fellow 
Alumnus. 

The student body takes an active part in the day's 
program. Fraternity and sorority houses will decorate in 
gay festival color exhibiting a spirit of hospitality to our 
Alumni and visitors. 

Activities actually begin in a big way on Friday night 
when a Student-Alumni Pep Rally is held on the cam- 
pus, with a bonfire snake dance, band parade, torch- 
lights and many other colorful exhibits which onlv stu- 
dents can put on. At noon on Homecoming Dav the 
Freshmen and Sophomores stage their annual tug-o war 
over the banks of the historic Paint Branch. 
1910 Gateway 

Class spirit will be presented in its top form when 
the Class of 1910 dedicates a new campus gateway as a 
gift from the class. The class boasts of many outstand- 
ing members in national and military circles, plus sci- 
entists and engineers. 

The exercises will be held just preceding the football 
game, the gateway is adjacent to the Rossborough Inn, 
the historic and traditional campus landmark, well 
known to every Alumnus. 

Rossborough Inn 

Headquarters, registration and a rendezvous for all 
Alumni will be the Rossborough Inn. The hospitable 
setting and surroundings makes this well-known land- 
mark an adaptable place for old grads to assemble. 

Everything naturally is subordinate to the one out- 
standing attraction, the football classic between the 
'Gators from the University of Florida and our own 
snapping Terps. This has always been a colorful and 
interesting game and is about the eighth time the two 
have been Homecoming opponents at College Park 
and in Florida. 

"M" Club Meeting 

Immediatelv following the game the annual meeting 
of the "M" Club will be held in the assembly room on 
the second floor of the New Administration Building. 
}. W. Stevens, '19, president and former gridiron star, 
will preside. Officers for the ensuing year will be elected 
and the important project of the Club, the Scholarship 
Fund, will be discussed. Every former winner of the 
varsity "M" is eligible to become a member and attend 
the meeting, in fact every former athlete should attend 
the meeting. 

The finale is the Homecoming Dance in the Gvm 



\ i mi m \ when \luniiii. students and facultj assembh in 
a wind up frolic. Gail] decoi it id and .i snapp] orchestra 
will in. ike tin .i most pleasant conclusion o( an eventful 
day. 

No Minimus who can p issibK mak< Homecoming 
should miss this day — Saturday, Octobei is Wriu Foi 
youi i esen.it ions ,it once, as orders are coming in rapidly. 



MISS MARYLAND 
HOMECOMING QUEEN 

The Student Executive Council have decided tli.it 
Miss Maryland, chosen by the 1941 Terrapin shall be 
I (omecoming Queen. The young lack who will have the 
honor is Miss Klmira Pearson. The queen's court will 
consist of other coeds from which Miss Maryland was 
chosen. 

As a part of the days program special coronation ex- 
ercises for so honoring Miss Maryland will take place at 
half-time of the football game. 

The young ladies of the queen's court will also be on 
hand as hostesses to the old grads when they registei 
at the Rossborough Inn. What a charming spot for 
charming hdit.M 

All Alumni should go to the Rossborough Inn Din- 
ing Room and register their presence on Homecoming 
Day. Let your fellow Alumni know you are present, 
which makes for all concerned a better day. It will not be 
necessary to pay youi dues in order to register. 



CLASS OF 1908 PLANS 
HOMECOMING REUNION 

This class never fails to have a class meeting twice a 
year, at Homecoming and on Alumni Dav. Reuben 
Brigham, secretary, sent out a two-page letter as a 
resume of the June meeting and what he had heard 
from classmates since then. At each class meeting the 
one and only woman member, and incidentally I be- 
lieve the first woman student, sends a letter from Glen- 
dale, Calif., Mrs. }. P. Frey (nee Flora Darling). 

The class has but three deceased members and but 
two unknown addresses out of 32 class members. The 
majority of the surviving members arc always present. 



Married — Miss Shirley Mae Grief and Mr. Kenneth George 
Belt, '33, were married July 12th at Ancon. Canal Zone. They 
reside at Balboa. Canal Zone. 

o o o 

Married — Miss Betty Barker, '39. a member of K.ipp.i Kappa 
Gamma, married Mr. James Berry of Washington 



5 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



Dr. Younger For Aviation 
Research Laboratories 

Dr. John E. Younger, chairman of the Mechanical En- 
gineering Department at the University of Maryland and 
winner of the Spirit of St. Louis gold medal for the ad- 
vancement of aviation, believes that the Government or 
private industry should sponsor research laboratories in 
the Nation's universities to develop new ways to build 
aircraft. 

For the past two years, Dr. Younger has been en- 
gaged, under the National Advisory Committee for Aer- 
onautics, in the studv of highspeed aircraft design. He 
has concluded that the aluminum alloy used in the so- 
called "all metal" planes will have to be replaced by a 
stronger material, possibly steel, to withstand the stress 
of higher speed flying. 

"But we are doing too little research in attempts to 
find new ways to build planes," Dr. Younger said vester- 
dav. "I am convinced that the present all-metal plane, 
of aluminum alloy construction, is not the ultimate in 
aircraft designs. 

"Plastics, magnesium, alloys, steel — all are adaptable 
to aircraft construction. I believe now is the time for 
establishment of privately endowed or Government-fi- 
nanced laboratories at universities for conducting re- 
search in this important phase of aeronautics." 

The first all-metal type plane construction in this 
country was developed at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio, 
in 1927-28. Dr. Younger was in charge of the technical 
research for this project. 

In 1935-36 Dr. Younger was associated with Army air- 
craft engineers at Wright Field in the development of 
the "pressure cabin" for substratosphere flying. This 
development is now in commercial use. 

It was Dr. Younger's research on the technical aspect 
of the pressure cabin that won for him the Spirit of St. 
Louis Gold Medal awarded this year. The award is given 
every three years by the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers for "meritorious service in the advancement 
of aeronuatics." 

Previous winners were Daniel Guggenheim, Paul 
Litchfield. Will Rogers and James H. Doolittle. 

— from Washington Post. 



A. O. Pi — Mrs. Carlcton W. Walil, formerly Miss Muriel 
(miiics. 39. attended the Alpha Omicron Pi convention in New- 
Orleans last month as the sorority's southern district superin- 
tendent of chapters in Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee ami Georgia. 

ooo 

Signal Corps — Lieut. Leonard J. Ottey, '39, will graduate 1>\ 
the end of this month from the Signal Corps School, Fort Mon- 
mouth, N. J. 



FELLOW ALUMNI ( Continued from Page 4 ) 

schedule provides one of the most colorful opponents 
played by Maryland — Florida — a fine bunch of men 
who always put up a good game and all true sportsmen. 

There is not only a good game between two good 
teams in the offing, but entertainment from the time of 
registration throughout the whole day — one of the most 
interesting features will be the dedication of a new gate 
near the Rossborough Inn. This gate is being presented 
by the Class of 1910. 

This is only one of many things classes may do and 
"more power to 1910." On the side I might sav this class 
is filled with prominent men— men participating in the 
affairs of world and state. 

It occurs to me that it would be very interesting to 
have a roster of Maryland men in their various activities 
of life. I am sure that we would learn that Mankind 
plays a large part in national, state and civic life. Just a 
short time ago I learned that one of our most loyal and 
hard-working Alumni had been promoted to be a Brig- 
adier General in the U. S. Army. Congratulations, Genk 
Lindsay McD. Silvester, Class '11. 

Since having been informed that one of my duties as 
President of the Alumni Association is writing this letter 
for each edition of the News, I have wondered why we 
could not have a letter from any Alumnus concerning 
his work or some other Alumni activities. We would all 
be glad to have the reaction of those fellows who are so 
situated they cannot get back except at very infrequent 
times. 

The News is for us and letters of commendation and 
condemnation will be welcomed by the Editor and pub- 
lished whenever possible (I do not always get mine in). 

Along with that, send a news item about yourself or 
any Alumnus that might be interesting to their friends. 

Try to be on hand October 18th for the Maryland 
Homecoming Day Game. Get the habit early this Fall 
and keep it up throughout all the year. This is the one 
year in a lifetime for a great many of us. The Grand 
Reunion in 1942 for all classes — the 50th Anniversary! 
Sincerely \ ours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 
• • • 

Class of 1910 Will Present Gateway 

(Continued horn Page 3) 
track; S. S. Stabler, a letter winner in football and busi- 
ness manager of year book; T. Ray Stanton, an agricul- 
turalist; Clarence W. Strickland, associate editor of year 
book; Millard E. Tvdmgs, cadet captain, valedictorian 
of the class and oratorical contest winner; Frank R. 
Ward, cadet first lieutenant and letter winner in foot- 
ball; II. D. Willis, a specialist in agriculture; Miles H. 
Woolford, deceased; G. C. Bowman, deceased. 



SEPTEMBER - 1941 



HOBBIE S 

A Challenge To Leisure 

by Clarence Lewis I loner 
Department oi Sociology 

Regardless of who you are. where yon live, or what you do 
to earn a living, you are a wise individual if you set aside eaeh 
day a certain amount of tune for plaj and relaxation, Plav and 
recreational activities of some sort satisfy fundamental human 
needs. They contribute to physical vigoi and mental health, at 
ford opportunities for individual self expression, aid in creating 
and maintaining a cheerful disposition, and help the individual 
to derive more personal happiness from life. All of us need to 
develop absorbing and creative hobbies which will take our minds 
off our work, and relax and stimulate us mentally and physically. 
Hobbies Defined 

For the purposes of this discussion, hobbies may be defined as 
those recreational interests to which an individual devotes a 
portion of his leisure time, and from which he derives personal 
satisfaction. The term is generally applied to a wide range of rec- 
reational activities, but "'a true hobby is a personal, intimate 
matter, capable of enjoyment by one's self, to be shared with only 
a few kindred souls." 1 Hobbies may be classified into three broad 
types: (a) the creation of things, (b) the collecting of things, 
(c) and the learning of things.'-' The range of hobbies found under 
each of these general headings is limitless. About all that can 
be done in this brief article is to indicate the various kinds of 
hobbies found under each heading, and give illustrations of each, 
so that if you have not vet found a hobbv you may soon acquire 
one. 

Suggestions For Hobbies 

Hobbies cover almost the entire field of recreational interests. 
Before choosing a hobbv an individual should first take stock 
of himself. What are your recreational interests? Along what lines 
do you have certain aptitudes? How much time and money can 
you afford to spend on your hobbv? Your age, sex, physical health, 
and mental disposition should all be taken into consideration 
before finally selecting your hobby. After you have thought 
through these questions the following suggestions may prove 
helpful in the event you care to develop a hobby. 

The National Recreation Association lists as one of its car- 
dinal recreation principles that every individual "should learn 
how to make something of beauty in line, form, color, sound, or 
graceful use of his body." a All of us enjoy and derive pleasure 
from creating or making something with our hands and minds. 
It is almost a universal urge and one which opens up all sorts of 
possibilities for hobbies, for both old and young. The arts and 
crafts provide a rich field to tap for those in search of creative 
hobbies. A suggestive list of creative hobbies might include 
among others the following: 4 

Basketry, china painting, etching, leather craft, painting, pho 
tographv, pottery, quilting, sketching, weaving, wood carving and 
many others. 

One of the most absorbing hobbies engaged in by countless 
people is collecting things. We are all collectors at heart. Our 
rooms and homes are cluttered with odds and ends, things we 
have diligently garnered up through the years. And, incidentally, 
we wouldn't part with them for anything, in spite at times of 
the protest of our wives (or husbands). Pipes, old shoes, china, 
marbles, books, wild flowers, shells, ties, bottles, firearms, coins. 



mugs, littci m inv iii mil homes from one end to tin othei l i 

has its own peculiai v line ami liiiin \l on< tilW "i m 

practicalh ever) irticle and item ol human us< has bun ■ <■ 

bv some curious and acquisitive individual Vmong tin more 

significant items fbi possible colli tors might be menti 

sue h things as these 

\lbuiiis, antiques, autographs, barbei mu^s. beads, I 
Jinks, coins, decanters, dime novels, dolls, embroidci 
fans, firearms, t<>lk Ion-, glassware, Indian arrowheads, jade, Inc. 

lamps, locks and kcv\. medals, paintings, post ■ uds. postage 

stamps, pottery, ship models, silver, son-s mil ballads, -111111 I 

stems and mugs and tapestiv . 

Still a third held ot exploration foi hobbv hunters 1-. that oi 

learning things, acquiring knowledge and skill in a particulai 

field. The age old adage, "We .ire nevei too old to learn," is 

applicable to all of us. The arts and sciences with all their bmul 
ramifications offer vast .mil multitudinous opportunities for those 
111 search of a hobbv involving the learning of things. Here we 
have the opportunity ot putting into use again, tor pleasure and 
profit, the special skills, techniques, and interests acquired during 
college days. This challenging field is so broad 111 scope and 1 on 
tent, touching as it does almost every aspect of culture studied 
by man. that one can do little more than briefly catalogue a few 
of the major subjects in the arts and sciences which might elicit 
the attention of the hobbv seeker. Among others, these include: 

Aeronautics, anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, dm 
dramatics, ethics, folk lore, geology, history, music, speech, sports 
and games, travel, zoology. 

Thus it appears we have the choice of many fields for hobbies 
ranging all the way from aeronautics to /oology. These, togethei 
with the other suggestive hobbies we have mentioned, offer each 
of us innumerable opportunities for rest and relaxation, for mental 
and physical growth during our lesmre tune. You need not be- 
an expert or necessarily have special aptitudes to develop a certain 
hobby. All that is needed is the urge, the desire to explore a 
particular branch of knowledge, to pit yourself against the known 
or unknown as the case may be. As von work along with the 
hobbv you will develop the necessary skill and technique. And 
this is part of the pleasure and fun you will derive from it. Since 
all of us have latent leisure time skills developed in college or latei 
life, why not put them to work again? Thej will give new mean 
mg, /.est, and variety to what is ordinariK for most of us a dull, 
drab, and commonplace day. All of us need to find and develop 
one or several hobbies. They're good for body and soul! 



' Butler. George D., Introduction to Community Recreation 
I New York, 1940), p. 372. 

- Calkins, Earnest E., Care and Feeding or Hobbj //discs , New 
York. 1934), pp. 'Ml. 

• ! National Recreation Association. Nineteen Recreation I'nn 
ciples (New York. 1939), p. 2. 

1 These lists of hobbies are adapted largelv from Butler, supra. 
pp. 206-212, and Calkins, supra, pp. 4- 56 

• • • 

Married — Miss Virginia Eyre Hudson. '40, and a member ot 
Kappa Delta, married \lr. I.ce Jackson of Baltimore last Maj 10th 
at the St. Andrew's Church in College Park \ reception tol 
lowed in the K. D. house. 

Other Alumni 111 the wedding partv weie Miss Elaine Duitoith. 
-in mow Nlis. Robert I?. Harmon); Miss Gingei Bolden, '41; 
Rip Hodson. '41: l\.\\ Fletcher, '42, and Bob Jackson, '35 
Mrs. Jackson is employed in the Baltimore City Health Depart 
ment in the Seiologv Laboratory. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



= By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Big Battle With Duke Also In Mind Of Coaches As 
They Face Western Maryland, Ancient Foe 



Jack Faber, Al Heagy and Al Woods had a lot of 
trouble on their minds when this was written with the 
game with Western Maryland Terrors coming up and 
the meeting with Duke coming just eight days later. 

Man land was to engage the Terrors in the Baltimore 
Stadium on the night of October 3 and to take on the 
powerful Blue Devils from Durham on the afternoon 
of the 11th at the same place. 

Duke, as all football followers know, is one of the 
Nation's outstanding teams and, as usual, is picked to 
be in the running for the mythical crown and a post- 
season bowl game. The Blue Devils are odds-on choices 
to win the title in the Southern Conference, of which 
Maryland also is a member. 

Terrors Offer Formidable Task 

But before Duke is reached, there is that scuffle with 
Western Maryland to think about. The Terrors are re- 
ported to be considerably better than last year when 
Maryland had its hands full to eke out a 6-to-0 victory 
on an early touchdown that resulted on a pass from 
Mearle Duvall to Joe Murphy. Murphy, who kicked 
and ran for the Terps to most of their points last year, 
is not around but Duvall is on hand and in stronger 
company. 

Maryland's attack, particularly, has been bolstered by 
the addition of sophs and the line also has been helped 
greatly. In all nine sophs are running on the first two 
teams which line-up as follows: 

First — Bob James, left end; Reggy Vincent, left 
tackle; John Morton, left guard; George Jarmoska, cen- 
ter; Frank Heyer, right guard; Ralph Burlin, right tackle; 
Luther Conrad, right end; John Cordyack, quarterback; 
Tom Mont, left half; George Barnes, right half; Jack 
Wright, fullback. 

James, Mont, Barnes and Wright are sophs and the 
others are lettermen. 

Second Combination 

Second — Louis Hesson, left end; Jack Dittmar, left 
tackle; Hal Berry, left guard; Jim Wharton, center; Ed- 
die Chovanes, right guard; Max Hunt, right tackle; Jack 
Gilmore, right end; Bernie Ulman, quarterback; Mearle 
Duvall, left half; Elmer Rigby, right half; Jack Mier, 
fullback. 

Hesson, Dittmar, Chovanes and Mier are the only 
rookies, the others having won their letter last year. 



Jack Brenner and Bill Helboch, backs; Bill Taylor, 
center; Dick Alexander, end, and Tony Nardo, guard, 
are other sophs who are highly valuable. 

These 26 men doubtless will be about the only ones 
to get their names in the line-ups this season but some 
others on the squad are working hard and should de- 
velop for the future. 

Maryland holds an 18-12 edge on Western Maryland 
in its series begun back in 1892 but was licked by fairly 
sizable scores in both of the games it has played with 
Duke. 

Schedule For 1942 Announced 

While Maryland is battling through its 1941 sched- 
ule, the card for 1942 already is set. As announced by 
Jack Faber, acting Athletic Director, it shows only two 
changes as far as the teams are concerned. Georgetown 
and Penn are not on the 1942 list, with Virginia, an old 
rival, returning after a lapse of one season, and Con- 
necticut being added. 

Virginia and Maryland would have kept their rivalry 
unbroken had they been able to have found a mutually 
suitable date this year. They are now booked through 
1943. 

Maryland will continue to play Georgetown in bas- 
ketball and baseball and Penn will return to the gridiron 
list in 1944. 

Connecticut will offer the opening game next Fall 
with Hampden-Sydney being moved down to fifth place 
on the card, in between the V. M. I. trip and the en- 
counter with Western Maryland in Baltimore. 

Florida Coming Back Next Fall 

Florida will return to College Park for the second 
straight year and Rutgers will be the opponent in the 
fourth home game. Washington and Lee has been listed 
for the closing tilt on Thanksgiving Day in Baltimore. 

The complete card: 

September 26— Connecticut at College Park. 

October 3— Florida at College Park; 10— Rutgers at 
College Park; 17— V. M. I. at Lexington; 24— Hamp- 
den-Sydney at College Park; 31— Western Maryland at 
Baltimore. 

November 7— Duke at Durham; 14— Virginia at Char- 
lottesville; 26— Washington and Lee at Baltimore. 



8 



SEPTEMBER — 1941 



Glte+nical AUwnsii Meet 

When the American Chemical Society held their an- 
nnal meeting in Atlantic City tins month a large group 
of Maryland Alumni gathered at the Marlboro Men 
hcim Hotel for a luncheon. 

Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08, former head of the Chem- 
istry Department and now Dean of the College of Arts 
and Science, led the campus representatives. Several 
other faculty members attended and the gathering was 
a good fellowship get-together. 

Among those present were Harry Duvall, '32, now a 
research chemist with duPont; Ronald F. Brown, '32, 
now instructor at Purdue; William P. Campbell. '36, 
Hercules Powder Co.; Joseph R. Spies, '34, U. S. Dept. 
of Agriculture; H. G. Clapp, '25, duPont Dye Works; 
John K. Wolfe, '36, National Institute of Health; Wil- 
liam A. Stanton, '36, duPont Film Corp.; Harry D. An- 
spon, '39, graduate student, U. of Md.; Glenn S. Weil- 
and, '28, Wittenberg College; W. W. Pigman, '36, Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards; Wilson H. Power, fellow- 
ship U. of Md.; John H. Gardner, former faculty mem- 
ber; F. R. Darkis, '22, Dept. of Chemistry, Duke Uni- 
versity; W. H. Baldwin, '35, Fish and Wildlife Service; 
Joseph S. Lann, '37, Lieutenant, U. S. Army; G. M. 
Kline, '34, National Bureau of Standards; John O. Bur- 
ton, '37, Minnesota and Ontario Paper Co.; Harry 
Stern, '40, Chesapeake Biological Lab.; Sylvan E. For- 
man, '36, Organic Chemist, U. of Md. Medical School; 
William L. Lamar, '29, U. S. Geological Survey; Charles 
E. White, '23, Professor, U. of Maryland; Shirley Glick- 
man, '37, U. of Md. School of Pharmacy; Bernice Hey- 
man, '38, bacteriologist; John H. Yourtee, graduate as- 
sistant, U. of Md.; Dancial C. Lichtenwalner, '26, Drex- 
el Institute; A. L. Glenner, '24, duPont; Winefred W. 
Flenner, '25, Delaware; Neil E. Gordon, Central Col- 
lege; Irving Madorsky, '41, George Washington Medi- 
cal School; Dr. Drake and Dr. Haring, U. of Md. fac- 
ulty; Walter H. Hartung, Pharmacv School faculty; Mil- 
dred W. Graffin, '24, Hercules Powder Co.; Jack Turer, 
U. S. D. A.; Daniel Swern, '40, research, U. S. D. A. ; 
John A. Krynitsky, '39, Chemistry Dept., U. of North 
Carolina; John C. Marzolf, '41, Lieutenant, Edgewood 
Arsenal; Carroll F. Palmer, '40, United Gas Improve- 
ment, Philadelphia; Roy W. Riemenschneider, '30, 
Eastern Regional Lab., U. S. D. A.; Giles B. Cook, '29, 
Crown Cork and Seal; Norman G. Sprague, U. S. Bu- 
reau of Fish and Wildlife; Milton S. Schechter, Grad- 
uate School; Donald H. Wheeler, '31, U. S. Regional 
Soybean Lab., Illinois; M. E. Rohn, '15, Chandler Pa- 
luba Co.; Arthur D. Bowers, '35, Campbell Soup; Ar- 
thur B. Hersberperher, '32, Atlantic Refining; Daniel 
Kaufman, '40, Engineer Reproduction Plant, U. S. 
Army; W. J. Svirbely, faculty; Marl W. Westgate, fac- 



Homecoming Guests of Honor 




Football Team of 1916 

PENN-MD. ALUMNI LUNCHEON 

Last year prior to the Penn-Marvland football game in 
Philadelphia the Alumni Association of the University 
of Pennsylvania sponsored a joint Penn-Manland Alum- 
ni Luncheon. 

Again the U. of Penn Alumni have proposed an- 
other luncheon to be held from 11:30 A. M. to 1:30 
P. M. in Houston Hall, West Lounge, on Saturday, 
October 25, the day of the Penn-Marvland game. Hous- 
ton Hall is located at 3417 Spruce Street, which is near 
Franklin Field, and one parking will do for both the 
luncheon and game. It will be of great help if those who 
plan to attend will make their reservations in advance 
by sending one dollar per person to your Alumni Secre- 
tary or direct to the Penn Alumni Association, 34th and 
Spruce Streets. 

Local arrangements are being carried forward by A. 
Moulton McNutt. '06, and John P. Mudd, '07, president 
and secretary of the Philadelphia Old Line Alumni 
Group. Dr. A. A. Parker, '04, president of the Alumni 
Association, will lead a large delegation of Marx landers 
to Philadelphia which he hopes will outdo the group of 
last year. This is a splendid idea and deserves the loyal 
support of everv Alumnus who can possibly attend. 

See vou in Philadelphia! 

ulty; George P. Hagcr, Pharmacv School faculty; Louis 
Flax, '43, Chemical Engineer; H. S. Bridge. '41. stu- 
dent; Richard A. Clark, '41, Sun Oil Co.; Gordon F. 
Dittmar, '41, Northwestern University. 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



Dr. Insley, '30, Honored 

\mong one of the coveted honors a voung surgeon 
desires to attain is a fellowship in the American College 
of Surgeons. Dr. Philip A. Insley, '30, M.D. '34, was 
notified to be present for his first meeting November 3 
to 7, the annual clinical Congress of the College to be 
held in Boston. The American College of Surgeons is an 
eminent organization composed of the outstanding 
surgeons of the United States and to become a member 
most rigid standards have to be met. Following gradua- 
tion he interned under the late Dr. Robert P. Bay, '05, 
and in 1936 became a member of the staff at the Penin- 
sula General Hospital in Salisbury. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association, the Southern Med- 
ical Association and the Rotary Club of Salisbury. He 
is also a member of Sigma Phi Sigma Fraternity. He 
married Miss Elinor V. Nichols and thev have two 
children. His secretarial work is eared for by Betty 
Harcum, '39. 



Md. Grads Killed in Plane Crash 

One of eight Armv fliers killed in a series of recent 
crashes was Donald Bierer, who was graduated last June 
from the University of Marvland, which he attended 
four years. 

Bierer, 21, a flying cadet, was killed at Fort Worth, 
Texas, while practicing acrobatics. Witnesses said a wing 
came off the plane. 

In his senior year at M. U. Bierer was sports editor of 
the year book, The Terrapin, and a member of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture livestock judging team which was 
sent to the National Livestock Exposition in Chicago, 
where the team took a prize. 

He was a member of the Rossborough Club, a social 
organization which sponsors dances at the Universitv 
and of Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity. He played baseball 
on the freshman team. He took a degree in Agriculture. 

Others to meet death in aeroplane crashes are Lieut. 
George Meeks, '38, in Iceland and Lieut. John Mears, 
'39, in Florida. 



ACCIDENTS 

Last Spring Ed Daly, '37, was in an aeroplane crash 
and unfortunately sustained a broken leg. After months 
of anxious waiting for proper knitting and healing, which 
was in vain, amputation became necessary. Being a true 
Old Liner gridman he gritted his teeth and took it with 
his chin up. He now is doing nicely. 

Coleman Ileadley, '38, former athletic luminary at 
College Park, received a bullet wound in his lung and 



ALUMNI RALLY RUTGERS GAME 

On November 1 the New York Alumni Group will 
sponsor another Alumni Rally and Cocktail Partv in 
New Brunswick, N. J., following the Rutgers-Marvland 
football game. The rally will be held at the Roger Smith 
Hotel on the third floor. It will be a get-acquainted meet- 
ing with good fellowship the only program. 

All Maryland Alumni and their friends are invited to 
come and participate. There will be no per capita cost; 
your expenses will only be what you desire to make 
them. 

The committee on arrangements is Malcolm Rich, 

17, Fred Rakeman, '18, Miss Sarah Morris, '25. and 

Don Kieffer, '30. The committee has arranged with 

Rutgers authorities to reserve a block of tickets for 

Marylanders. 

Go to the south stands and look for Marvland section 
sign. Get with your fellow Alumni and help cheer the 
boys on. It is desired, however, that vou get your tickets 
in advance by writing your Alumni Office at College 
Park. The price is $1.65. 

Your fellow Alumnus expects to see vou at Rutgers. 
• • • 

Dr. Taliaferro, Dean Emeritus, 
Succumbs 

We regret to learn of the death of Dr. Thomas Hardv 
Taliaferro, recently retired Dean of the Faculty. 

Dr. Taliaferro was a graduate of the famous Virginia 
Military Institute in the Class of 1890. He taught for 
a few years at his Alma Mater and followed with several 
years at the University of Florida. In 1904 he came to 
University of Maryland as a teacher in Mathematics. 
His career at Maryland was a steady rise as he became 
head of the Department of Mathematics, Dean of En- 
gineering, Dean of the College of Arts and Science, and 
Dean of the Faculty, the position he held at retirement 
in March. The faculty tendered Dr. and Mrs. Taliaferro 
a departing reception at the historic Rossborough Inn 
near the close of the last school year. 

Probably few men have gone from among the living 
with a warmer feeling for the Universitv of Maryland 
than Thomas Hardv Taliaferro, a sterling character and 
eminent scholar. 

Every Alumnus joins the Editor in expressing con- 
dolence to Mrs. Taliaferro. 



stomach this summer while innocently trying to protect 
others. He has been quite ill but following a long battle 
his spirit, physical attributes and determination seem to 
be winning. Coleman is in the Universitv Hospital in 
Baltimore. 



10 



GRAPEVINE 



NEW 



about those we know 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. George Hendrickson announce the ar- 
rival of a daughter who lias been named Patricia Anne. George in 
a member of the Class of 1931. The Hendricksons reside in Sal- 
isbury, Md. 

OOO 

Legion — James W. Stevens, '10, president of the "M" Chili, 
attended the American Legion National Convention at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, this month as a delegate from the State of Maryland. 
OOO 

Marines — Major C. T. Bailey, '21, is executive officer of 
Marines at St. Thomas, Virgin Island. N. N. Morris. '2i, who re- 
turned from the Island this summer reports "/eke" Bailey is 
doing a fine job. 



Birth — Dr. and Mrs. Philip A. Insley ("51) and '34) announce 
the arrival of Emily Loudell, born in August. Dr. Insley is a 
practicing surgeon in Salisbury, Md. 

OOO 
Puerto Rico — Miles Fairbanks now heads the Puerto Rican 
Reconstruction Corporation. He is located at San Juan. The work 
includes many public buildings and schools as a part of a ten 
year building program. 



Virgin Island — N. N. Norris, '23, for several years head of the 
Agriculture Experiment Station work on the Virgin Island, has 
returned to the States and is now located in the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

OOO 

Army — Lieut, and Mrs. Warren Evans visited the campus on 
short leave from Camp Lee, Virginia, where Warren, '39, is sta- 
tioned. Offhand he named several other Old Liners in camp: 
Sten McCarr, '35, Charley Weidinger, '39. He's going to look up 
some more and send in their names. 

OOO 

Married — Miss Dorothy Danforth, '38, a graduate of the School 
of Nursing, and Dr. Daniel Hofe, Jr., were married October 4 in 
Baltimore. 



Gossip — There is a big party to take place in Arlington Village 
next year. Those who are interested call Helen and Dan Lamer, 
Arlington Village, Va., who are on the information committee. 



Iceland— The Mumni S card from Lieul I i 

Beamer, '40, U S Marine Corps, .md now stationed in Iceland 
Franny, .i football lineman, entered tin- Marine traini 
following graduation .mil has been .i lull lieutenant foi some time 

OOO 

Married —Miss Mary Phyllis Jones, a forma student, and 
Gordon I.. Kluge, '41, were married August JO, last !• ■■•■ >. an all 
Maryland wedding with Miss Audrey Jones, '38, is maid of honor 
.md Joseph Peaselee, '39, as lust man I in newlywed 
mi; .it Ml Quincj Street, N.W., Washington, D ( 



Kngineer — Benton R Gatch, -lit, now is m Puerto Rii " doing 
construction worlc on an Arm) Base. He is with tin- Is: 
neers, San Juan, Puerto Rico, V 1'. (). 806. Ben is well re- 
membered for his cheer leading attributes and when no! <ln 
the others m cheers he was getting in his maximum of cheering 



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BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



MAKE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 1942 GOLDEN REUNION 

Contribute To The TERRAPIN PARTY 



Fellow Alumni: 

1 wish to be a contributing member of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation, and am enclosing the usual 
amount of $2.00 for the year 1941-1942; 
of this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
scription to the Alumni News. 



r PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Name. _ Class 

Address — 

Married? To whom .._ 

Business address 



Occupation 



Children 



Title, 




Send for your free 
copy and see why 




for a Cooler Milder Better-Tasting smoke 



.Like millions who have read it, Chesterfield 
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the only complete picture story telling you all about 
the making of a great cigarette. 

TOBACCOLAND gives you all the interesting facts 
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O DO 

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rettes the more you 11 enjoy Chesterfields. 



Everywhere you go . . . 
it's have a Chesterfield 



Mvrn T.,i.., , ,. ( ., 



yAe&SafiJffl 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



:.- 



OCTOBER, 1941 



h3 

O & 

• P^ 
0) 

O rH 

o o 



v. 

3. 



3 





ON THE WHARVES of Liverpool and 
Singapore, in a freighter's hold halfway across 
the Atlantic, in a truck on the Burma Road, you 
will find them — three words stencilled on a 
thousand boxes and bales: "Made in U.S.A." 
Yesterday, three big words to look for. But 
today they stand for more than the unequalled 
engineering and production that have made 
them familiar on every dock and pier in the 
world. They stand for the productive strength 
of a free people — a productive strength that 
cannot be matched; they stand for a determina- 
tion to "deliver the goods" — a determination 
that will not be thwarted. And in the ports of 
the world's embattled democracies, where nun 



are hourly risking their lives to take delivery, 
they stand {or freedom itself! 

To keep this great flood of goods moving is 
the most important job in the world today. 
^Yherever it moves, General Electric helps to 
provide motors and propulsion equipment to 
keep it moving. In trains hauling ore to America's 
factories; in factories building guns and tanks 
and planes; in ships carrying oil to Britain and 
food to China; in destroyers and cruisers and 
battleships patrolling two oceans — the words 
"General Electric" stand beside "Made in 
U.S.A." General Electric Co., Schenectady, New 
York, U.S.A. 




GENERAL » ELECTRIC 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND \l.li\l\l \l A\ S. ( )C : K )BI ■'.!<. I«MI 



Number ^ 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1941 -42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins. '23, First Vice-President 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer 



Calvert Hills, Md. 

Baltimore, Md. 

.College Park, Md. 



ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whitekord, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Longridge, '29 Education 

f. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman. '37, '40, 

Secretary. Frederick. Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY — Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, *2S, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown. Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearn^, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 



James W. 


Stevens, 
Stevens, 


"M' 

'19 


CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

President Dr. Ernest N. Cory, '09... 


Secretary-Treasurer 


Myron B. 


'27 


Vice-President Edwin E. Powell, '13 











SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 



W. M. Kishpaugh, '17 Football 

Eddie Semler, '23 Baseball 

Tilghman B. Marden. '25 Lacrosse 

H. B. Shipley. '14 Basket Ball 

Seymour W. Ruff. '17 Track 

Egbert Tingley. '27 Tennis 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 Cross Country 



Frank Hawkins, '34 Boxing 

Dr. Buckey Clemson, D.D.S.. '21 1 

James M. Swartz, '19 | 

Jerre H. Sullivan, '21 (..At Large 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, M.D.. '04 

I.kf. Pennington '15 

(!. F. Pollock, '23 



COVER PICTURE 

One of the most familial campus 
pathways. This is a scene earlj in tin 
Fall and such will he the cl.nk 
sight until the close of school. The 
winding walk leads from the main 
campus gateway at College Avenue 
and the Boulevard to the top of the 
Hill going by the Chemistry, \gi> 
culture and Arts and Science build- 
ings. There is a branch from this 
walk that goes through the under 
pass with which many are familiar, 
especially those on an evening stroll. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

WOW'! — what a Homecoming 
Day the boys put on for us. You fel- 
lows who failed to show up missed 
a whale of a good time; as good a 
football game as you will ever sec on 
anybody's field, along with any num- 
ber of your old friends, for they were 
there from the oldest on down to 
last year's graduates. 

Everybody present paid tribute to 
a great bunch of football players 
who came up as the under dogs and, 
by their spirit and gameness, out- 
played a great Florida team, led by 
one Harrison, who was as hard to 
hold as the proverbial greased pig. 

Whether we like the idea of the 
Three Musketeers, or whether we 
are sold on the idea of a Dictator for 
coach, congratulations are in order 
and herewith extended to I'abcr. 
Ileagv and Woods for the splendid 
work they did with the team in one 
week, after being steam-rolled by 
one of the great football machines 
of the year — Duke. 

A most interesting and inspiring 
feature of the cl.i\ was the prcscnta- 
( Continued on Page 10) 



OMECOMING HIGHLIGHTS 




Terrapin Girl Cheerleaders Greet the Florida Sponsors and Mr. Gator — Congressman Cole, president of the 
Class of 1910, cuts the ribbon opening the new campus Gateway, presented to the University by that class — 
The Sophomore Class wins the annual Tug-o-War at Paint Branch — Dr. H. C. Byrd crowns Miss Elira 
Pearson, "Miss Maryland of 1941" as Homecoming Queen — Pershing Riflers present massed colors open- 
ing the half-time parade at the Homecoming Game. 



OCTOBER 



1941 






The 1941 Homecoming was probably the most col- 
orful and spectacular program ever put on at College 
Park. First on the eventful clay's activities was the Fresh- 
man-Sophomore tug-o-war, which the Sophs won. Now 
their name will be engraved upon the sacred Terrapin 
statue for the second time, as the same class won last 
year as Freshmen. What'a class' 

Alumni filtered in all during the morning, swapped 
yarns around the Rossborough Inn and took strolls 
about the new part of the campus. At noon the Class of 
1910, which held the limelight in honors for the day, 
gathered for lunch in the University Dining Hall. So 
did the Class of '08. 

Gateway 

One of the most outstanding gestures in Alumni rec- 
ords was the presentation of a new campus gateway near 
the Rossborough Inn by the Class of 1910. This gatewaj . 
shown elsewhere in this issue, is built of brick and of 
colonial architecture to blend in with that of the Ross- 
borough Inn. Here the class and a group of Alumni, 
students and friends gathered to see Congressman W. 
P. Cole, Jr., president of the class, cut the ribbon and 
open the gateway for the presentation. Mr. Henry Holz- 
apfel, '93, chairman of the Board of Regents, received 
in behalf of the University. Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, made 
a few remarks congratulating the class. 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, acted as master of ceremonies. Mr. William 
Holbrook, president of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation; Miss Doris McFarland, president of Mortar 
Board, and Mr. Orville C. Shirey, president of Omicron 
Delta Kappa, presented letters to the Class of 1910 on 
behalf of their respective organizations. Mr. Larry Mac- 
Kenzie, vice-president of the S. G. A., and Miss Mary 
Ann Griffith, secretary of S. G. A., accompanied Mr. 
Holbrook in the presentation of the letter. 
Football Game 

The rumble of the drum and the plunk of the pigskin 
called the attention of everyone to Byrd Stadium where 
the 'Gators of Florida and the Terps of Maryland were 
to have an interesting afternoon and it was interesting! 
Maryland was the first to score and took the lead over 
the favored 'Gators. In the second half Florida came 
back and scored twice to take the lead. They threat- 
ened twice again but a stout Maryland line was equal 
to the occasion and gained possession of the ball. In the 
fourth period the Terps launched a drive with passes 
and runs which took them to midfield. With two min- 



utes left to play jack Wright flipped a neat pass to 
Mearle DuVall who fingered it, juggled and then pulled 

in the pigskin to his aim and was away to the coveted 

goal line. A Florida man took a desperate dive .it tin 
line but too late and it was Maryland leading. 13 12. 
Soon the final whistle and Maryland was victorious in a 
brilliant Homecoming game. The campus and town 
then began a jubilant evening of frolic and fun. 
Student Spirit 

All Fraternities and Sororities were the ineeeas for 
many boys and girls of yesteryears. The houses were 
ablaze with attractive Homecoming decorations which 
said welcome to our grads. Up on the Hill the Home 
coming Victory Dance in the Gym-Armor) attracted a 
large throng of Alumni, faculty and students. 

The show put on by the students for the returning 
Alumni was probably the most enthusiastic and hospit 
able exhibit ever presented. Prizes were given for the 
best decorated Fraternity or Sorority house and Sigma 
Phi Sigma got first honors. For the first time all dor- 
mitories on the campus were dressed with flying colors 
as a gesture of welcome to the boys and girls of yester- 
years. 

Float Parade 

At half-time of the football game a most attractive and 
colorful Homecoming parade was presented by the stu- 
dents. The outstanding feature of this part of the show- 
was the crowning of Miss Maryland (Miss Elmire Pear- 
son ) as the Homecoming Queen by President II. C. 
Bvrd. The parade began with the massing of colors by 
the Pershing Rifle unit of the R. O. T. C. and the play- 
ing of The Star-Spangled Banner. Then the parade be- 
gan, led by a mounted color guard on four black horses 
from Fort Myer. The color guard was composed of 
members of the riding club. Miss Maryland and her 
court followed with the other fifteen floats passing in 
review. The Class of 1943 took first place with the theme 
"A Terrapin Hurricane Wrecks Florida" and so it did 
in the fourth quarter. 

"M" Club Meeting 

On Homecoming Day the annual meeting of the 
"M" Club is held. This year it was held immediately 
following the game with a very good attendance. The 
outstanding feature of this meeting was the presentation 
of a compiled "M" Club directory of which Ed Powell. 
'13, was the editor. Officers for the ensuing year were 
then elected and f. W. Stevens, '19, was re-elected pres 
(Continued on Page 10) 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



Class of 1910 
Dedicates Gateway 

The Class of 1910 gathered on Homecoming Day and 
presented a new campus gateway to the University. 
Prior to the presentation the class had lunch in the 
University Dining Hall. Immediately after lunch they 
went to the Rossborough Inn for the presentation ex- 
ercises. Congressman W. P. Cole, Jr., president, made 
the presentation remarks and Hon. Henry Holzapfel, 
'93, chairman of the Board of Regents, accepted. Col. 
O. H. Saunders, secretary of the class and a wheel-horse 
in the class activities, gave brief remarks on class interest. 
Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, president of the University, made 
a brief talk congratulating the class for their splendid 
gesture. 

Cole's Remarks 
Mr. Cole, in his presentation remarks to Chairman 
Holzapfel, said, "The Class of 1910 is enjoying a reunion 
primarily for the purpose of presenting to our Alma 
Mater this gate. It is a token of the ever increasing re- 
gard we have for the University of Maryland. It is not 
big in value or pretentious in appearance, but it is as 
you see it, concrete evidence of our love, first for old 
M. A. C. and now for her parent University. 

"In making this contribution to the campus of the 
University, we have deliberately dictated its design so 
that the figure '10' will appear prominently both day 
and night and we have done so with the hope that the 
students of today will coin the familiar phrase, 'Meet 
us at the Gate 10', and when they do that it will con- 
tinually echo through the future life of this great Uni- 
versity. 

"Finally, as we present this gate to the University 
through you we want to acknowledge the feeling of sat- 
isfaction we have in the enviable position the Univer- 
sity occupies today in the educational institutions of 
the country. We hope that this little contribution from 
us will act as an incentive for others to tie their af- 
fections more closely to this institution which has meant 
so much to all of us." 

The following are excerpts from the letters and reso- 
lutions presented the Class of 1910 by the student or- 
ganizations : 

"WHEREAS, on Homecoming Dav, October 
18, 1941, the Class of 1910 of the University of 
Maryland is presenting a memorial gateway and, 
whereas, the gateway represents a beautiful struc- 
ture on the campus, and reflects the loyalty and al- 
legiance of the Class of 1910 to the interests of the 
University, be it therefore 

"RESOLVED, By the Student Government 
Association of the University of Maryland in meet- 



CONGRESSMAN COLE 

HEADS OIL COMMITTEE 

Congressman W. P. Cole, '10, is chairman of the 
Congressional committee surveying the oil situation in 
the United States. Last week he was one of the principal 
speakers at the Independent Petroleum Association of 
America held in Tulsa, Okla. It was the twelfth annual 
convention of the association. 

Next month Congressman Cole will go to the West 
Coast to be on the program at the American Petroleum 
Institute in San Francisco. This is the largest gathering 
of oil producers in the country and represents practically 
the entire oil industry. 



Lawyer Escape & Co. 
Author, Ashman, '08, LL.B. 

The Trustee Press, Inc., of Baltimore, present a so- 
ciological novel, "Lawyer Escape & Co.," revealing the 
lives and experiences of "Lawyer Escape" and his cli- 
ents. Louis S. Ashman, '08, LL.B., is the author and 
himself a prominent and illustrious member of the Bal- 
timore Bar. Many noted jurists and lawyers of Baltimore 
and State have expressed lauditorv comment about his 
timely and constructive publication. 

The book and its proceeds are dedicated to Human 
Welfare and all profit will go for philanthropic purposes. 

Those interested in procuring a copy will write direct 
to the Trustee Press, 211 East Fayette Street, Baltimore, 
or to your Alumni secretary who will be glad to forward 
your request. The price is $2.50 per copy. 



Engagement — Miss Judith King, '40, a member of Kappa Delta, 
and Mr. Norman Glenn Manning of Kansas are engaged. Both 
are employed at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 



ing assembled on October 16, 1941, representing 
the entire student body of the institution, that the 
student body hereby expresses its appreciation of 
the splendid gift of the Class of 1910, and will 
cherish it as one of the most valuable possessions 
of the school, and be it further 

"RESOLVED: That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be presented to Congressman W. P. Cole, 
president of the Class of 1910, with the request that 
he have them entered on the minutes of his class 
organization." 

William Hoi.brook, President, 
Larry McKenzie, V.-President, 
Mary Ann Griffith, Recorder. 
(Continued on Page 11) 



OCTOBER - 1941 

"M" Club Re-elects 
Stevens, '19, President 

\t the annua] meeting of the "\l" Club, held on 
Homecoming Day, James W. Stevens. '19. was re-elected 
president for the ensuing year. \1. B. Stevens, '27, a 
former football luminary, was re-elected vice-president, 
and Dr. E. N. Cory, '09, another former footballer, was 
re-elected secretary-treasurer. E. E. Powell. '13, the 
father of lacrosse at Maryland, was elected historian. 
The other members of the Board of Representatives were 
elected as follows: 

For football. \V. M. Kishpaugh, '17. Ilcrshcv. Pa.; 
baseball, Eddie Sender, '23, Hagerstown, Md.; lacrosse, 
Tilghman B. Marden, '25, Baltimore, Md.; basket ball, 
H. B. Shipley, '14, College Park. Md.; track, Seymour 
\Y. Ruff, '17, Randallstown, Md.; tennis, Egbert Ting- 
ley, '27, Hyattsville, Md.; cross country, Talbot T. 
Speer, '17, Baltimore, Md.; boxing, Frank Hawkins, '34, 
Hyattsville, Md. 

Members-at-large are Buckv Clcmson D.D.S., '21, 
Baltimore, Md.; James M. Swart/. '19, Baltimore, Md.; 
Jerre H. Sullivan, '21, New York City; A. W. Valentine, 
M.D., '04, Washington, D. C; Lee Pennington, '15, 
Washington. D. C. and G. F. Pollock. '23. College 
Park, Md. 

An attractive directory of "M" Club members who 
answered Roll Call was presented at the meeting bv 
E. E. Powell, originator of the idea and editor. It repre- 
sented a splendid idea and lots of work by Ed Powell. 
The directory, bound in a black paper cover with the 
M in gold, made a most attractive appearance. The in- 
formation contained therein about many former Old 
Line athletes is interesting and valuable. 

The scholarship fund was another very interesting and 
important subject discussed with several ideas presented 
for installing new effort into raising more funds. 

• • • 

FOOTBALLERS OF 1916 
WERE GUESTS OF HONOR 

The boys of the 1916 team, celebrating their 25th 
anniversary, saw an Old Line team perform and gain a 
victory which brought back memories of the great season 
they had in 1916. One of the greatest games ever to be 
played at College Park was in 1916 with the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute. The scoring see-sawed with 
each team desperately taking the offensive but with the 
aid of the brilliant drop-kicking by "Untz" Brewer, Mary- 
land won, 15-9. Kishpaugh, one of the greatest guards 
the State has ever known, led his team in a great game. 

Here are some of the boys who were on hand: "Untz" 




James W. Sum ns. 'I') 
President "M" Club 



O.P.M.Want Industry Specialist 

The Division of Civilian Supply of the Office of I'm 
duction Management urgently needs men to assist in 
operating its important industry branches. These 
branches are: Pulp and Paper, Printing and Publishing, 
Lumber and Building Materials, Plumbing and I leafing. 
Automotive Farm Equipment and Transportation. Rub- 
ber and Rubber Products, Electrical Appliances and 
Consumers' Durable Goods, Industrial Machinery, and 
State and Local Government Requirements. 

We need graduate engineers and economists between 
the ages of 30 and 55 who have had substantial expe- 
rience in the production and sales of commodities, ma 
chinery, etc., and who have had public contact and can 
carry on liaison work in connection with national de- 
fense problems as they affect civilian supply. Present 
employment need not be a deterrent to applicants. 

Above all, we want men who will go all-out with us in 
the gigantic defense task before us — patriotic men who 
will work hard and long, knowing that with each ounce 
of effort they put forth, the security of the United 
States will be that much strengthened. Salaries will be 
paid according to United States Civil Service Comnus 
sion grading. The general range, according to the ability 
and experience of the individual and the importance of 
the position for which he is chosen, is from $3,200 to 
$5,600. 

Communications should be addressed to Norris B. 
Gaddcss, Acting Executive Officer. Division of Civilian 
Supply, Office of Production Management. Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



Brewer. "Hobby" Derrick, "Big" Posev, "Dutch" Axt. 
"Bert" Coggins, "Bear" Ruff, "Avey" Williams. "Kish" 
Kishpaugh. and "Jim" Stevens. 






Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Cadets And Generals 
Are Last Home Foes 

Maryland has two more home football 
games — with V. M. I. at College Park 
on November 15 and with Washington 
and Lee five days later on Thanksgiving 
Day in the Baltimore Stadium. 

The Terps hold an edge in both series 
but that with V. M. I. is close and the 
Cadets could even it up by winning this 
year. 

V. M. I. is said to have the best back- 
field trio in the South in Joe Muha, Bosh 
Pritchard and the team scored 11 touch- 
downs in its first five games, although win- 
ning only one. 

The Generals have one of the most 
powerful lines in the country but their 
attack does not appear to be near as potent 
as Maryland's. This should just about even 
up the fracas. 

Here are the past records: 



With V. M. I. 



1906— V 
1910— V 
1916— Md 
1917— Md 
1918— Md 
1927— U. 
1928— U. 
1929— V. 
1930— U. 
1931— U. 
1932— U. 
1933— V. 
1934— U. 
1935— U. 
1936— V. 
1937— U. 
1938— V. 
1939— V. 
1940— V. 



M. 1 33 

M. 1 8 

State .15 
. State 14 

State .. 7 

of M 10 

of M 

M. 1 7 

of M 20 

of M 41 

of M 12 

M. 1 19 

of M 23 

of M 6 

M. 1 13 

of M 9 

M. 1 47 

M. 1 13 

M. 1 20 



M. A. C 5 

M. A. C 

V. M. 1 9 

V. M. 1 14 

V. M. 1 6 

V. M. 1 7 

V. M. 1 

U. of M 6 

V. M. 1 

V. M. 1 20 

V. M. 1 7 

U. of M 13 

V. M. 1 

V. M. 1 

U. of M 7 

V. M. 1 7 

U. of M 14 

U. of M 

U. of M 



With W. and L. 



1924— W. and L. . .19 
1925— W. and L. . . . 7 
1926— W. and L. . . 3 
1927— W. and L. .13 

1928— U. of M 6 

1930— U. of M 41 

1931— U. of M 13 

1932— U. of M 6 

1933— U. of M 33 

1934— W. and L. . . . 7 

1935— U. of M 

1936— U. of M. 19 

1937— U. of M 8 

1938— U. of M. 19 
1939— Shift in Thanksgi 

cancellation 
1940— U. of M.. 



of M 7 

... 3 
... 
... 6 



U 

U. of M.. 

U. of M.. 

U. of M.: 



W. and L 



W 

w 

W. and L 
W. and L 
U. of M.. 
W. and L 
W. and L 
W. and L, 
W. and L. 
ving Day forced 

7; W. and L 7 



and L 6 

and L 7 

.0 
.13 
... 
... 

... 
...13 



Boxing Work Started 
Under New Coach 

Boxing preparation has just started at 
College Park under the new coach, Bobby 
Goldstein, former Virginia fistic great. He 
replaces Mike Lombardo, Maryland '38, 
who was called into the Marine Corps as 
a second lieutenant. 

Lombardo had a 50-50 season in 1941 
with a green team, winning three matches, 
losing three and tieing one, and Goldstein 
inherits all of the material Mike had. 
Jan. 10 — South Carolina at Columbia. 
Jan. 17 — Coast Guard Academy. 
Jan. 31 — University of Virginia. 
Feb. 7 — Catholic U. at Washington. 
Feb. 11 — Western Maryland. 
Feb. 14— Virginia Tech (All-U Night). 
Feb. 21— North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Feb. 27-28 — Southern Conference Tourney. 



Smith, Frosh Mentor, 
Has Some Good Boys 

Bob Smith, one of Maryland's greatest 
centers of all time, is coaching the Terp 
frosh football squad while continuing his 
studies. He's had his allotted time with the 
Terps on the gridiron but is a lieutenant- 
colonel in the R. O. T. C. Unit, command- 
ing one of the battalions. 

He has some pretty good material but 
most of it is green, with the linemen being 
generally stronger than the backs. The 
young Terps lost to the V. M. I. yearlings 
in their opener, but tied George Washing- 
ton frosh, a much bigger outfit, 6-6, and 
were underdogs in their three remaining 
games with the following: 
Nov. 1 — Navy Plebes at Annapolis. 
Nov. 7 — Georgetown Frosh. 
Nov. 15 — Washington and Lee Frosh (10 
A. M.). 



FIELDS TUTORS HARRIERS 

Maryland's cross-country team is being 
coached by Tommy Fields, mile and 2- 
mile ace of the past three years. Tommy 
is rather shy on talent and has lost Con- 
ference meets to Virginia and North Car- 
olina. 



Travel Will Toughen 
Soph Basket Squad 

Varsity basket ball for players who are 
not in football has been started by Coach 
Burton Shipley for a heavy season that 
will get under way on December 13 with 
a visit to Richmond U. 

There will be eight games away from 
home before Washington College is met 
in Ritchie Coliseum on January 16. Trav- 
eling will be featured by a trip to New 
York to battle three topnotch teams. Ship- 
ley's tossers will be mainly sophs this sea- 
son and the tough siege of early tilts was 
arranged to develop them. 
Dec. 13 — Richmond U. at Richmond. 
Dec. 15 — William and Mary at Williamsburg. 
Dec. 19 — West Virginia at Cumberland. 
Dec. 30 — Seton Hall at South Orange, N. J. 
Dec. 31— City College of New York at N. Y. 
Jan. 2 — St. John's at Brooklyn. 
Jan. 8 — Virginia at Charlottesville. 
Jan. 9 — Duke at Durham. 
Jan. 16 — Washington College. 
Jan. 21 — Georgetown at Washington. 
Jan. 23 — George Washington. 
Jan. 31 — Virginia. 
Feb. 2— V. M. I. at Lexington. 
Feb. 3 — Washington and Lee at Lexington. 
Feb. 7 — Washington and Lee. 
Feb. 11 — Navy at Annapolis. 
Feb. 13 — William and Mary. 
Feb. 14— West Virginia (All-U Night). 
Feb. 18— Army at West Point. 
Feb. 20— North Carolina. 
Feb. 23 — Duke. 
Feb. 27— V. M. I. 

March 5, 6 and 7 — Southern Conference tour- 
ney at Raleigh. 



TERPS SHY ON WEIGHT 

Lack of weight in the line is the big 
trouble with the Man-land varsity football 
team. The Terps have used a total of 25 
men, forwards and backs, in games this 
year and their average is only 180 pounds. 
This means that the team has been out- 
weighed 1 5 or more pounds to the man 
in all its big games. That's a terrific han- 
dicap. 

SOCCER TEAM BEST EVER 

The Terp soccer team doubtless is the 
best in the history of the school. It scored 
shutouts in its first three games and then 
tied powerful Temple at 1 -all. Temple 
last vear rated second in the East. 



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MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



Students Present Colorful 

Program for Homecoming 

(Continued from Page 5 

ident. While the "M" Club bows were meeting their 
wives and friends were being entertained at tea in the 
Rossborough Inn. Mrs. E. N. Cory was chairman and 
head hostess for the affair. 

The final function of the day was the Homecoming 
Dance and naturally a victorious team and a gen- 
eral spirit of "mardi gras" gaiety made the Victor)' Ball 
a colorful close for a great day long to be remembered 
bv those who were fortunate enough to return. 

Here are a few who registered their presence: 

Miss Catherine Aiteheson. '36, Richmond, Va.; Miss Gene- 
vieve Aitcheson. '40, Laurel, Md.; Louis Ashman, '08, Baltimore, 
Md.; Ridgely W. Axt, '20. College Park, Md.: Dr. E. I. Baum- 
gartner. '31, Oakland, Md.; William Beall, '36, Berwyn, Md.; 
Dick Baldwin. '34, Baltimore. Md.; Marian Bond, '40, Washing- 
ton. D. C: L. E. Bopst, '16, College Park, Md.; W. A. N. 
Bowland. '07, McDonough, Md.; Roswell R. Boyer, '29, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Brooke Brewer, '22. Chew Chase, Md. 

Charles M. Chance, '41, College Park, Md.; Elizabeth M. 
Cissel. '41, Washington. D. C; F. S. Chichester, '19, Aquasco, 
Md.: Bert Coggin, '17, Washington, D. C: William P. Cole, Jr., 
'10, Towson, Md.; C. M. Compher. '25, Detroit, Mich.; Phillip 
C. Cooper, '31. Ocean City, Md.; Ernest N. Corv, '09, College 
Park. Md.; G. C. Day, '08. Baltimore, Md.: George H. Dent, '24, 
Baltimore. Md.; Horace B. Derrick, '17, Towson, Md.; H. Ro- 
land Devilbiss. '11, Riverdale, Md.; Crown O. Diehl, '18, D.D.S., 
Hagerstown, Md. 

Jack Faber, '26, College Park, Md.; John H. Fetty, '40, Ta- 
koma Park. Md.; Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D.. '03, Baltimore, 
Md.; William J. Frere, Jr.. '10, Georgetown, Del.; William F. 
Gannon, '41, Randolph Field, Texas; George E. Gilbert, '37, 
College Park. Md.: Carolvn B. Grav, '41, Poolesville, Md.; Sam- 
uel D. Gray. '10, Washington, D. C; W. Allen Griffith, M.D., 
'09, Berwvn. Md.; Brinklev Havman. '41. Baltimore. Md.; Bettv 
Head. '40', College Park, Md.; Herschel H. Allen, '10. Baltimore, 
M.; J. Q. A. Holloway. '09, Bellerose, N. Y.; Mrs. Edna Burnside 
Howard, '29, Baltimore, Md. 

M. Louise Howard, '28, Washington, D. C; Mildred Smith 
Jones, '22, Washington, D. C; Dr. Harry J. Kefauver, '00, Fred- 
erick. Md.; Lieut. Harold L. Kelly, '37, University Park, Md.; 
William W. Kirbv, '22, Rockville, Md. ;> Gordon L. Kluge, '41, 
Washington, D. C; Virginia Long Law, '40, Selbyville, Del.; Lu- 
cile Laws, '37, Silver Spring, Md.; Mike Levin, '15, Akron, Ohio; 
Grenville Lewis, '97. Mechanicsville, Md.; Georgiana C. Light- 
foot, '38, Takoma Park, Md.: Otto London, '18, New York 
Citv; Urah Long, '08, Selbvville, Del.; Peggy Maslin, '39, Port 
Chester, N. Y.; F. T. Maxwell, '39, Towson, Md.; Thomas Mears, 
'39, Washington, D. C. 

Lieut. A. R. Miller, '40, Washington, D C; Paul H. Morris, 
'16, Front Roval, Va.; T. B. Mullendore, '04, Buffalo, N. Y.; Mrs. 
Carolvn Mullinex, '37, Elkton, Md.; Paul E. Mullinex, '36, Elk- 
ton, Md.; H. B. McDonnell, M.D., '88. College Park, Md.; Vir- 
ginia McFadden. '37, Riverdale, Md.; Mabel M. Nash, '25, Alex- 
andria, Va.: William A. Nolte, '37, Washington, D. C; A. A. 
Parker, M.D., '05, Pocomoke Citv, Md.; Michael Pelczar, Jr., '36, 
College Park, Md.; W. B. Penn, '24, Hvattsville. Md.; N. E. 
Pennington, '30. Rockville, Md.; W. T. Perkins. '15. Glenn Dale, 
Md. ; G. F, Pollock. '23, College Park. Md.; W. B. Posev, '18, 
College Park, Md.; E. E. Powell, '13, Towson, Md; P. C. Pough, 
'96, Sykesville, Md.; F. B. Rakemann, '18, Long Island, New 
York: Aileen M. Rohn, '36, Brunswick, Md.; George II. Sachs, 
'36, Washington, D. C. 

Lida Sargeant, '41, Silver Spring, Md.; Col. O. H. Saunders, 
'10, Fort Leavenworth. Kansas; John E. Savage. M.D., '28, Bal- 
timore. Md.; Louise Townsend Savage, '30, Baltimore, Md.; R. 
Karl Shank, '36, Hagerstown, Md.; J. O. Shumate, '19, Chevy 
Chase, Md.; Ruth E. Somerville, '37, Cumberland, Md.; Adele 
Stamp, '24, College Park. Md.; T. Ray Stanton, '10, University 
Park, Md.; Louise Brockman Steinberg, '38, Riverdale, Md.; 
James W. Stevens, '19, Baltimore, Md.; W. Mackenzie Stevens, 



FELLOW ALUMNI (Continued from Page 3) 

tion of a gate, alongside the Rossborough Inn, bv the 
Class of 1910. The Hon. W. P. Cole who, notwith- 
standing his success in his chosen field and the honors 
which are his, is still "Bill" to all the boys, and repre- 
sented his Class in the presentation ceremonies with a 
very appropriate speech. 

Let us hope that the action of the Class of 1910 will 
stimulate the interest of other classes, if not to material 
things, at least to the point of a personal appearance at 
some of our various reunions. 

That calls to my mind that the next opportunity we 
will have for a real get-together will be Charter Dav, m 
January, in Baltimore. This has now become an annual 
affair and brings together what is probably a better 
cross-section of the Alumni than any other gathering of 
the whole year. Alumni from every school of the Uni- 
versity are present. See to it, when the notices go out 
for that meeting, you get your reservations in early for 
a great Maryland Reunion. 

Maryland men are everywhere, so why wait for an 
annual affair for a reunion? Why not arrange for a 
weekly or monthly gathering of the Alumni in your va- 
rious communities — get acquainted with those you do 
not know and rekindle the old fire? All Maryland men 
have a fund of good stories and recollections of time 
spent on the Hill which will be of interest to any who 
have spent time there themselves. Organize now and 
enjoy the spirit of friendship you will find present at 
such times. 

There are still a number of counties in the State where 
there are not County Maryland Groups (my own coun- 
ty is one). There should be such an organization in 
every county and surelv there is someone in each county 
with interest sufficient to get the boys, and girls now, 
together. 

Do this now and when we gather in June for that 
Fiftieth Anniversary of the Alumni Association — that 
only happens once in a lifetime — let a roll of County 
Groups be called with a 100 per cent, response. Keep 
this in mind and prepare to be present in June. 
Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Dean, College Park, Md.; Charles W. Svlvesrer, '08, Baltimore, 
Md.; T. B. Symons, '02. College Park, Md. 

R. V. Truitt, '14, College Park, Md.; A. W. Valentine, M.D., 
'04, Washington, D. C; Dr. E. A. Wallin, '26. College Park. Md.; 
W. Kennedy Waller, M.D., '28, Baltimore, Md.; Frank R. Ward, 
'10, Roselle'Park, N. J.; Carroll F. Warner, '33, Washington, D. 
C; Donald E. Watkins, '23, Mount Airv, Md.; Maver Wein- 
blatt, '39, Baltimore, Md.; F. M. White, '11, Dickerson, Md.; M. 
Maxine White, '38, Dickerson, Md.; Clav P. Whiteford, '05, 
Whiteford, Md.; Edith Burnside Whiteford. '29. Ruxton, Md.; 
A. V. Williams, '17, Baltimore, Md.; V. M. Wingate, '33, Win- 
gate, Md.; Joseph S. Winter, '40, Takoma Park, Md.; May 
Louise Wood, '28, Washington, D. C; L. Ferdinand Zerkel, '06, 
Luray, Va. 



10 



Class of '10 Dedicates Gateway 
(Continued from Page 6) 

MORTAR BOARD 

"Our University is growing rapidly, and tins 
has been made possible only through the combined 
efforts of the administration, the Alumni and the 
students. The Class of 1910 has left not only a bean 
tifnl memorial, but an inspiration to the Maryland 
Campus. It will stand as one of the bonds that tie 
the Alumni and the student body into one Univer- 
sity of Maryland." 

Miss Doris MoFarland, President. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

"RESOLVED, That Sigma Circle of Omicron 
Delta Kappa hereby tenders its deep appreciation of 
the generosity of the Class of 1910 in presenting to 
the University this gateway, a permanent symbol 
of the feeling that exists among the Alumni for 
their University. Further, be it resolved that this 
society recognizes the leadership of the lion. Win. 
P. Cole, Jr., and of the Class of 1910 in this under- 
taking, and takes pride in the realization of that 
leadership." 

Orvtlle Siiiki.v, President. 
Members of the class present were Herschel 11. Allen, 

Baltimore; W. P. Cole, Towson, Md.; John I,. Donald 

son, Washington, D. C. W. J. Frere, Lcmoync. Pa.; 

S. D. Gray, Washington, D. C; 1'". J. Maxwell, Towson, 

Md.; O. II. Saunders, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; S. S. 

Stabler, University Park; T. R. Stanton, Riverdale, Md.; 

Frank R. Ward, Roselle, N. Y. 

• • • 

Engineer — Edwin A. Hawkins, '41. is an engineer at the Glenn 

L. Martin Company in Baltimore. 

O O 

U. S. D. A.— Out in Wenatchee, Wash., C. P. Harley, '23, is 

a physiologist for the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
O O 

Representative — Denzel E. Dayis, '35, is the Eastern Sales 
Representative of the Manufacturers Brush Company of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He is located in Maplcwood, N. J. Denzel married 
Miss Nancy T. Brice, '38. 

OOO 

Attorney — Roland A. Linger, '34, is a patent attorney for Ra- 
dio Corporation of America but on active duty with the J. A. G. 
D. as a captain in the patent section. 



JIM MEADE JOINS ARROWS 

The Richmond Arrows of the Dixie Pron tonal 1 
I),: 1 1 I ,eague signed John (Jarrin' Jim \l< ide, 195-po 
All-Southern Conference back foi tin Dips m 
and toi tin- past two years a memrx i ol tin \\ a hi 
Redskins' squad. 

Meade, dialled several months ago, is stationed .it 
Camp Lee, assigned to the medical detachment. 

"We have been dickering with farrin' [im foi several 
weeks." said I.inwood Jones, the Arrows' business nun 

ager, "and the ink is still wet on Ins contract. Meade is 
the man we have been looking foi to round out the 
baekfield." 
Coach George Magill said Meade "should help solve 

our baeklield problem." 



HEADQUARTERS 

for Good Times 
C^lie Az>oro Jjaitbnorc <jtoteL 

Convenient for Football Fans while fol- 
lowins the TERPS. 700 comfortable 
rooms, two restaurants, bar and luxurious 
Cocktail Lounge at your service. 

Maryland's Baltimore Games: 
Nov. 30 (Thanksgiving) Wash, and Lee 

Maryland's College Park games: 

November 15 V. M. I. 

Charter Day: 

Saturday, January 17, 1942 

Cfn ideal place to entertain 

(/^ I S3 TO $6 SINGLE 

LORD BALTIMORE 

<JZoteL 



BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



MAKE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 1942 GOLDEN REUNION 

Contribute To The TERRAPIN PARTY 



Fellow Alumni: 



=PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



I 



wish to be a contributing member of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation, and am enclosing the usual 
amount of $2.00 for the year 1941-1942; 
of this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
scription to the Alumni News. 



Name 

Address 



Class Occupation 



Married? To whom. 

Business address 



Children 



Title 



- 



ANGELA CUMMINS 

Chesterfield's 
Girl of the Month 




-» 



V MILDNESS, for BETTER TASTE and COOLER SMOKING, 

Chesterfield is the winning cigarette . . . they're quick to satisfy with 
their right combination of the world's best cigarette tobaccos. 

All around you, pack after pack, you'll see Chesterfields 
giving smokers a lot more pleasure. Join in, light 'em up, 
and you've got a cigarette to cheer about. 

Everywhere you go . . . 

it's have a Chesterfield 





ALUMNI 
NEWS 



NOVEMBER, 1941 



i P - 
o ^ 

I o d 
J pa t3 

CO 
j >> rH 
! *-. .-I 

I c o 




GRAND REUNION 
of Fellow Alumni 

JUNE 5, 1942 

COLLEGE PARK 



Gelebsiatina _ r b^ 




*\^ 



&* 



University 
Alumni Association 

ORGANIZED IN 1892 



Presidents of the Association 



*MELVIN C. HAZEN, '88 1892-1894 

*R. B. B. CHEW, '83 . 1894-1896 

♦EDWARD G. NILES, '90 1896-1898 

FRANK B. BOMBERGER, '94 1898-1902 

*J. ENOS RAY, '92 1902-1904 

♦SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY, '93 1904-1907 

W. S. KEECH, '93 . 1907-1909 

F. W. BESLEY, '92 ... ... 1909-1911 

W. D. GROFF, '00 191 1-1912 

♦J.B.GRAY, 75 1912-1913 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL, '93 1913-1915 

R. M. PINDELL, '89 1915-1917 

F. P. VEITCH, '91 . . 1917-1918 

*R. LAURIE MITCHELL, '02 1918-1920 



M. E. TYDINGS, '10 1920-1922 

W. P. COLE, JR. '10 1922-1924 

J. HANSON MITCHELL, '98 1924-1929 

H. C. WHITEFORD, '01 1929-1931 

M. E. TYDINGS, '10 1931-1933 

J. P. MUDD, '07 1933-1934 

*J. ENOS RAY, '92 1934-1935 

T. B. SYMONS, '02 1935-1936 

F. B. HINES, '04 1936-1937 

E. F. ZALESAK, '25 1937-1938 

C. WALTER COLE, '21 1938-1939 

CHAS. W. SYLVESTER, '08 1939-1940 

P. W. CHICHESTER, '20 1940-1941 

A. A. PARKER, '05 1941- 



Note: Asterisk marks deceased men. 



nunc 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS. \( )\ ! AIHI.K. 1<HI 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1941 
Dr. 



42 



A. A. Parklr, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note ■ — The officers named above arc also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Loncridce, '29 Education 

]. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28. . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 



President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 
H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 



ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary, Frederick, Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32. Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32. 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum. '38. Sec 

retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



James W. Stevens, '19 ^.President 

Myron B. Stevens, '27 -Vice-President 



Dr. Ernest N. Cory. '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

Edwin E. Powell, '13 Historian 



SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 



W. M. Kishpauch, '17 Football 

Eddie Semler, '23 -..Baseball 

Tilghman B. Marden, '25 -Lacrosse 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basket Ball 

Seymour W. Ruff. '17 _ Track 

Egbert Tingley, '27 Tennis 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 Cross Country 



Frank Hawkins, '34 Boxing 

Dr. Buckey Clemson. D.D.S., '21 

James M. Swartz, '19 

Jf.rre H. Sullivan, '21 

Dr. A. YV. Valentine. M.D.. '04 

I ' : Pennington '15 

G. F. Pollock, '23 



At Large 



COVER PICTURE 

I Ik New Administration Build 
ing, located .it the Easl end of the 
new campus. Few would know tins 
new part of the campus until the) 
stop and think thai it is the valley 
which was m rear of the Agriculture, 
Chemistry and Engineering Build 
ings. Along one side ran the old 
Riggs Road, now removed, and the 
new road comes through the campus 
north of Gucrncaux I [all. 

The Administration Building has 
three groups of columns which make 
a stately scene. In front of this build- 
ing the Pershing Rifle Company, 
crack drill unit of the R. (). T. C 
met Lord Halifax. 

• • • 

FELLOW ALUMNI: 

Maryland's 1941 football history 
is made — probably none of us are 
very well satisfied but what is past 
cannot be changed. This one thing 
is certain — credit must be given 
unstintingly to a courageous squad 
of football players, who gave their 
all. At times they rose to heights 
much above their normal and at 
other times, by sheer force of power 
they were pushed into the depths 
by their opponents. But, whether 
the sailing was fair or their ship sunk 
by the storm, they were in there 
fighting until the last shot was fired, 
with not a thought of .surrender. 

I feel that we, all Alumni, can 
take an extremely good lesson from 
the way these boys carried on in the 
face of adversity. From all sides I 
have had these types of questions 
and remarks handed to me: "What's 
the matter with Maryland?" A\ In 
don't we get a team!'" "Win not 
get a big-time coach and have a real 
(Continued on page 5) 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 



O. D. K. Tapped 
Lord Halifax 

Lord Halifax, British Ambassador to the United 
States, was tapped for honorary membership by Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa last week at College Park. The Am- 
bassador was presented by Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, 
also an honorary member of O. D. K., then tapped by 
Orville Shirley, president of the fraternity. The R. O. 
T. C. band played "God Save the King" as a packed 
coliseum stood in honor of the British Ambassador. 

Upon his arrival at the campus the British statesman 
was greeted by a 19-gun salute and the Pershing Rifles, 
crack drill unit of the R. O. T. C, which served as escort 
from the Administration Building to the Coliseum. 

In his remarks the Ambassador said, "American and 
British universities stand shoulder to shoulder to pre- 
serve free learning and the unfettered search for truth." 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, president, described the British Am- 
bassador as "one of the world's greatest leaders." Also 
tapped for honorary member was Lieut.-Col. Robert E. 
Wysor, Jr., professor of military science and tactics at 
the University. Nine students were tapped for member- 
ship. Those honored were Douglas D. Wallop, son of 
Douglas Wallop, '19, Samuel Moore, Robert Russell, 
Robert Searles, Norman Rosenfield, Harold Smelser, 
Harry Spicer, Oliver Guyther, and Edward Price. 



Chisolm Wins In Photography 

Two scries of pictures by Julian J. Chisolm, Wash- 
ington photographer, which appeared originallv in the 
rotogravure section of the Sunday Star were chosen for 
the gold and silver medal awards bv the International 
Salon of Nature Photographs 

Chisolm has received official notification that his pic- 
tures were chosen as the best entered in one of the four 
sections of the salon, which was opened at the conven- 
tion of the Photographic Society of America last month. 

The awards were in the class for series of pictures 
telling a story. There were three prizes awarded in the 
class, with Jack's pictures taking first and second medals. 

The first series of pictures showed the development 
of a wasp being used in the fight to control the Japanese 
beetle. These pictures were made in a laboratory at the 
University and published in The Star's rotogravure sec- 
tion July 14, 1940. 

The second prize went to a series of pictures showing 
the stages in the shedding of a hard crab's shell. These 
pictures were made in the Chesapeake Bay Biological 
Laboratory at Solomon's Island and appeared in the 
rotogravure section of November 3, 1940. 

Jack is a specialist in plant materials and, because of 
his success in making photographs of the type which won 
the prizes, is now employed professionally as a record 
photographer. 



Alumni At MaCOIl, Ga. Mause, '38, Royal Air Force 



Several Alumni have written in to this office re- 
questing the names of those who are on active duty with 
the army at the various camps throughout the country. 
It is difficult to keep up with the army transfers but if 
those who read this would just drop a card to the 
Alumni Office giving the name, rank and camp of 
any Maryland Alumnus now on active duty it would 
help a lot. 

Private T. Nelson Haase, '41, now at Camp Wheeler, 
Ga., writes for the names of Marylanders in that camp. 
He knows about some of them but there must be others 
and he is anxious to contact them. He is with Company 
D, Third Training Battalion. 

Those in active service should drop the Alumni Office 
a card and we may be able to tell you that a fellow 
Alumnus is in the same camp and you not know it. Get 
the fellows together and we can have Maryland Alumni 
Clubs in every camp. 



Sales — Nathaniel John Wilson, '25, is Sales Engineer for the 
Cherry- Burrell Corp., at Baltimore. His address is 234 Carroll 
Parkway, Frederick, Maryland. 



John David Mause, '38, visited his home in Myers- 
ville, Maryland, en route from training school at San 
Diego, Calif., to Canada from where he will fly in a 
bomber to Scotland. He stated that he expected to un- 
dergo six weeks of training in Scotland before being as- 
signed to a bomber escort patrol in the London area. 
Mause was one of four men who successfully com- 
pleted the course begun by fifteen men. Mause said his 
rank of pilot officer compared with that of first lieu- 
tenant in the United States Army and added that if 
America actively entered the war he would automatical- 
ly be transferred to the United States Corps with the 

rank of Captain. 

• • • 

Deceased — Frederick C. Burton, Class of '32, died November 
4th, after an illness of one week. He had been a member of the 
Fort Hill High School faculty since the opening of the school in 
1936. 

The faculty of Fort Hill High School attended the funeral in 
a body, accompanied by student representatives from classes and 
homerooms. An outstanding teacher, Mr. Burton was characterized 
by Victor D. Heisey, principal of the school, as one who ex- 
celled for teaching theorv and putting it into practice. 



NOYIMRI R — 1941 



FELLOW ALUMNI (Continued from Page 5) 

team?" "Go ahead and start something and I will back 
yon up." "How do you expect us to get up any enthusi 
asm when we can never sec onr team win?" "I'm 
ashamed to let it be known I'm a Maryland man when 
I read the scores in the Sunday papers." 

To my mind every question and remark of such type 
was an indictment against the one who made it. I low 
many Alumni who feel as those who put fortli such re- 
marks arc trying to do anything about it? If you are not 
satisfied with your business, your car, your home or your 
clothes, what do you do about it? You get down and 
dig until you are in a position to improve one or all — 
you do it on your own because they are all personal 
belongings. Did it ever occur to you that, as Alumni, 
Maryland and its representative teams are vour teams 
and it's your obligation to help them? They are fighting 
for the glory of your Alma Mater and it behooves you 
to give them your material as well as spiritual help 
that they may be strengthened and you made to feel 
proud of Maryland teams and a glorious self-satisfaction 
in seeing some protege of yours "carrying the ball." 

Maryland gets her football representatives principally 
from our own State. How many good athletes go out of 
our State to other schools? What did vou do about your 
star high school athlete who went to Virginia, Caro- 
lina, Pennsylvania or elsewhere? How many high schools 
in Maryland play football? That is where we should be 
drawing our material from — have you tried to interest 
your high school in football, the most popular game in 
America? You can do so because every Maryland Alum- 
nus is influential in his community affairs — and if he 
isn't, he should be. There are enough Alumni through- 
out the State to create the interest and desire for high 
school football and when such a condition becomes a 
fact, there would be no dearth of material. 

A big-time coach and a big-time team we would all 
like to have; but there is big-time work for every indi- 
vidual Alumnus to do in order that we may have it. 
There are ways and means and if you do not know them, 
attend your "M" Club meetings, your Alumni Asso- 
ciation meetings, your other Maryland gatherings and 
become enlightened. Do not expect because you at- 
tended school for four years, and have your sheepskins, 
you are privileged to sit back with your thumbs in the 
armholes of your vest and have a few hard workers 
carry you on the crest of the wave for the next fifty years. 
You have your part to play — get busy now for your 
share in 1942. 

Holy smokes! After reading this, I do not know 
whether to send it in or not. This harangue sounds like 
I might have a D.D. after my name instead of an M.D. 
Anyway, it goes! 



Dean Robinson, President-elect 
American Dental Asso. 

Dr. J. Hen Robinson, '14, D.D.S Dean <<l (Ik Bal 

timoie College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, I'm 
versity ol Maryland, was elected President-eled <>t tin 

American Dental Association at the annual election of 

the Association on October 30 in Houston. Texas Di 

Robinson, who has been Dean ot tin Dental School 
since 1924, was bom in Clarksburg, West \ irginia. He 
received Ins collegiate training at Marshall College and 

at the University of West Virginia, and spent six years 
as a teacher in the public schools of \\ est Virginia he- 
fore beginning the stndv of dentistn at Maryland in 
1911. He graduated from the University in PJH with 
Magna Cum Lauclc honors and was limnccliatch ap 
pointed to a teaching position on the stall of the Dental 
School, rising to the professorship of Operative Den 
tistrv in 1919. Dr. Robinson served as a member of the 
Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners from 1 ( )22 
to 1924, is a past president of the Maryland State Dental 
Association, of the American Association of Dental 
Schools, and of the American College of Dentists. He 
served in 1935 as a member of the Dental Advisory 
Committee to the Technical Staff Studying Compul- 
sory Health Insurance, and is at present serving on the 
Council on Education, on the Committee on History 
and the Committee on Preparedness of the American 
Dental Association. He is a member of the Dental Ad- 
visory Committee to Selective Service in Washington. 
He has written extensively on various subjects including 
education, socio-cconomics, history and operative den- 
tistry. 

Dr. Robinson is a member of the Man land I listorical 
Society, the International Association for Dental Re- 
search, the New York Academy of Dentistn and is an 
honorary member of the Society of Surgeons of Guada- 
lajara, Mexico. He is Supreme Grand Master of Psi 
Omega Fraternity, is a member of Omicron Kappa Up- 
silon, of Sigma Xi, and Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternities. 

Some of you have said "Start something." Maybe I 
have said enough to make some think they are sitting 
on a pin and others will pull their fingers around their 
collar. All I want is to stir your interest and get vou in 
the swim with us — attend your local Mankind gather- 
ings and come to the general ones — the next one is 
Charter Day, on January 17, in Baltimore, and to the 
Grand Reunion on Friday, June 5. 1942, at College 
Park. I'll be there with you, with a body guard, so do 
not try to make me cat my words. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parkkr. '05, 

President. 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 

"SMEAR" POLITICS 

An Anaylsis Of 1940 Campaign Literature 

by Hugh A. Bone 

Professor of Political Science 

This article is a condensation of Dr. Bone's recent book "Smear" Politics (American Council on Public Affairs, Washing- 
ton. D. C. $1.00). The study created so much interest that it had news and editorial comment from newspapers all over the United 
States. Dr. Bone is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Maryland. 



The character of campaign literature has been too long ne- 
glected by those charged with the enforcement of corrupt prac- 
tices laws. Malicious propaganda has been on the increase and 
the American people can no longer afford to ignore some of the 
obnoxious doctrines circulated during political campaigns. Publicity 
played an especially unsavory role in the 1940 presidential cam- 
paign in spite of the Hatch Act and other Congressional measures 
to promote "cleaner politics." 

Campaign literature may be divided into three categories ac- 
cording to authorization: 

1 . Issuance by the political parties 

2. Authorization by temporary non-party organizations 

3. Unidentified "wildcat" publications carrying either a 

bogus signature or is completely uncredited. 

Party Publicity 

Campaign materials emanating from the publicity divisions of 
the Democratic and Republican headquarters do not create as 
serious a problem as those issued from other sources. Party organ- 
izations can be held responsible for their titterings and hence do 
not indulge in excesses which might react as a boomerang upon 
them. However, several pieces were released which were not a 
credit to the party. For instance, one Republican tabloid carried 
the inflammatory headline "WALLACE PRAISES DICTA- 
TORS, SLAMS PRIESTS IN BOOK MS", followed by a story 
that his volume was of such a nature as "to horrify many good 
Christian Americans." By taking a few passages (an old propa- 
ganda device) from a study made by Wallace of sixteenth century 
leaders, the article attempted to show he was in favor of present- 
day dictators and was anti-clerical. 

One of the Colored Divisions of the Democratic Party issued 
an offensive pamphlet playing up Willkie's German ancestry and 
quoted from Hitler's Mein Kampf that "Negroes are lower than 
apes." 

Party leaders should exercise stricter supervision over materials 
distributed in the name of the party. Moreover, they should 
promptly and clearly repudiate all incitations based upon race, 
religion and class. 

Non-Party Campaign Materials 

Since political parties were limited by the Hatch Act to a total 
expenditure of $3,000,000 it is not surprising that many temporary 
organizations were created to bear the costs of publicity incident 
to the campaign. The following names show how far some of 
these groups were prepared to go in devising names calculated 
to impress the public: American Coalition, American Women 
Against Communism, Anti-Triple Threat League, Clearing House 
for National Interests, First Voters' League, Hollywood for Roose- 
velt, Insurance Club for Willkie, Men of America, National Com- 
mittee for Agriculture, Mission Willkie Volunteers, National Gen- 
tile League, and the National Committee of Physicians for Willkie 
for President, the Loyal American League of Rhode Island. The 
last-mentioned published a sensational leaflet which compelled 
immediate attention because of its outright assertion that THE 
NAZIS ENDORSED WILLKIE. No address of the group was 
listed. It is believed that the name is entirely counterfeit. 



Similarly a group calling itself the Mothers of Pennsylvania dis- 
tributed a handbill grossly misrepresenting the conscription pro- 
gram and alleging that a law was in the offing to draft women and 
young girls "to be on duty with the armed forces." It closed with 
these words — 

"DO YOU THINK that the morals of your daughters can 

be safeguarded under such conditions? 

"YOU HAVE ONLY THIS ONE ELECTION to save 

the lives of your sons and daughters!" 

Every "political committee" seeking the election of a candi- 
date is required by Federal law to file a report of their expendi- 
tures. Yet out of 133 groups who published literature over their 
names, only 6 sent reports to the authorities! This offers a shock- 
ing example of how a law may be honored more in the breach than 
in the observance. 

Anonymous Literature 

Plenty of objectionable materials came from the foregoing 
groups, but the most abundant as well as the most scurrilous and 
vicious specimens of campaign journalism came from anonymous 
and undisclosed sources. Literature possessing no identification 
as to author, sponsor, printer, distributor was of every conceivable 
size, shape, form, color, and left no appeal untouched. It varied 
from this billboard sign in Philadelphia: 

SAVE YOUR CHURCH! 
DICTATORS HATE RELIGION 
VOTE STRAIGHT REPUBLICAN 
to obscene verse printed on calling cards, and to stickers on the 
backs of envelopes, which read: 
3rd Term 
3rd Reich 
3rd Internationale 

Anti-Semitism provided the theme for an appallingly large 
amount of publicity. This material blamed the war, "communistic 
influences." and the "fifth column" onto the Jews and claimed 
that the Roosevelt Administration was largely dominated by the 
Jews. Under cover of anonimity the Democrats were alleged to 
be the "Catholic Party" while the Republicans were represented 
as the "Protestant Party." 

Italians were urged to vote against the President because he 
had stirred the people against the Italo-Americans by stating that 
"Mussolini stabbed France in the back." An attempt likewise was 
made to arouse the hatred of the Poles for Roosevelt by asserting 
that he "let Poland down." 

Class distinctions were inflamed and fears raised by unsupported 
charges that if the New Deal were continued life insurance policies 
would become worthless and wealth and property confiscated. 
Other rabble-rousing appeals were used to pit labor against capital. 
to stir up suspicions among professional men, and to undermine 
morale of those who were going to enlist in the armed forces. 

Space forbids inclusion of samples of crude appeals to voters 
upon the basis of nationality and race or of religious differences 
or of economic class. Suffice it to say that many unAmerican 
groups seized the "free for all" of the campaign to disseminate 
inflammatory and objectionable ideas with little check but their 
own financial resources. 



NOVEMBER — 1941 



Other highly objectionable campaign propaganda was centered 
around personal attacks upon the nominees and t lien families 
Willkie was characterized among many other things .is .1 "Nazi" 
or "Nazi sympathizer," a "tool of Wall Street," an "amateur," 
a "labor-baiter," a "vulgarian," a "rapacious capitalist," an "in 
humanist" and "a barefoot Wall Street lawyer"; Mrs Willkie 
was alleged to be "half Polish." In li is turn, Roosevelt was libelled 
a "communist," a "warmonger," a "tool of the fifth column," .1 
"pampered, petted, spoiled Little Lord Launtlcroy," and was ac 
cused of having an insatiable desire to become a dictator, 

No single theme of this personal type recurred with greatei 
frequency than the army commission given to Elliott Roosevelt. 
Even phonograph records, entitled, "Elliott, I Wanna He .1 
Cap'n Too" were distributed in large numbers. Typical of the 
song is the following verse: 

A Captain's bars arc burnished 

And they glitter in the sun. 

Their wearers arc the wise ones 

Who have all their errands run 

I haven't passed the courses, 

I haven't done "Squads Right." 

But I guess I'd be a Captain 

If my Dad had so much might. 
Mrs. Roosevelt was bitterly taken to task in campaign literature 
for her radio broadcasts, "associations with Communist youth." 
and her alleged attitude toward the Negro. No member of the 
President's family escaped criticism for using his "official con- 
nections to rake in the shekels." Almost all of this type of publicity 
was anonymously printed and clandestinely circulated. 

Methods Of Control 

Many groups seized the last campaign as an opportunity to 
spread doctrines designed to foster class, religious, and racial 
hatreds at a time when national unity is needed. It is difficult to 
regulate campaign literature for care must be taken not to violate 
freedom of press. The states and the national Government share 
in the electoral process and this results in division of responsi- 
bility. Our melting-pot population and need for representation 
of various occupational groupings make it necessary for nominees 
to appeal to special interests. Certain appeals to minorities are 
thoroughly justified and therefore it is difficult to draw the line 
between ethical and unethical appeals. 

Nevertheless, a few suggestions may be made to improve the 
situation. Legislative remedies might include: 

1. Federal and state laws making it unlawful to circulate cam- 
paign material which fails to clearly disclose the name, identity 
and address of the sponsor or printer. 

2. Printing at public expense a publicity pamphlet containing 
a biography and statements about each candidate. 

3. A few well-timed libel and slander suits against gross of- 
fenders. 

4. A study of campaign literature by a Congressional Com- 
mittee, especially during the campaign. Several groups might be 
more careful of their literature if they knew in advance that their 
products would be scrutinized by such a body. 

In the final analysis, however, the most powerful curb lies in the 
use of public opinion; opinion which will exact higher standards 
from publicists than the law demands. Cleansing of political lit 
erature is possible if the press, newspaper columnists, radio com- 
mentators, the party leaders, the civic spokesmen, and the elector- 
ate unite in a demand that this ugly situation be reformed. Accu- 
rate exposure, just denunciation, widespread demand or good taste 
in campaign argument, and insistence that the election laws be 
justly enforced is needed. 



NEW 




K 



about lho.se we know 



Marriage — Mr. and Mis Thomas | fohnSOn announced the 

marriage ol theii daughter, Margaret, to Lieut. John (■ Freuden 
berger, '3 ( ), on Novembei 7, l'Ml. it Catonsville, Maryland. 
000 
Birth — Mr. and Mis Horace E. Troth, 3rd, announce the ai 
rival of a baby girl, who has been named Mar) Vlii < Hoi u 

membei i>t the (.liss ol 1934. The Troths have moved into then 

new home at 14 Farragul Avenue. Kensington, Maryland 
000 
Birth — A daughter was recently bom to Lieut. Thomas (). 
(Pat) Rooncv. '33, and to Mrs. Roonej nice Miss Virginia 
Terry) — both Maryland graduates. The event took place 111 
Fort Beaming, Georgia, where Lieutenant Rooncv is in command 
of the Headquarters Company of the Second Brigade. The date 
was September 2nd. 

OOO 

Automotive — Richard C. Williams, 14. is manager of the An 
tomotivc Sales for the E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., with of- 
fices in Detroit, Mich. 



U. S. D. A. — Kenneth Grace, 16, a former trackstcr of note 
now is doing investigation work for the United States Department 
of Agriculture. At present he is working down South. 
OOO 

Army — Major E. Roane Melton. '25, now is on active duty 
with the United States Army and stationed at Fort Sill, Okla- 
homa, with the Eighth Field Artillery Observation Battalion. 


Hollywood — John E. Ennis, '26, is in Hollywood; no, not in 
the movies but might be shortly. He has been sent there as man- 
ager of the J. C. Penney Company's new store. He wants all 
Marylanders to stop in to see him when visiting Hollywood. 
OOO 

Shipbuilding — John C. Sterling, '16, is superintendent in the 
Machine Shop Division of the Newport News Shipbuilding and 
Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia. 


Married — Miss Man' Spcakes, '39, a member of Kappa Delta, 
and Lieut. Carlisle Ilummelsine, '38, former editor of the Dia- 
mondback, were married August 17 last in Washington, Va. Carl 
had been directing the Bureau of Information for the University 
before being called to active duty in the army. Mrs. I Imnmelsine 
teaches Home Economics at the Mt. Rainier High School. Best 
man at the wedding was Paul Pfeiffer. '37. 


Marines — Donald II. Williams. '38, now is .1 second lieuten- 
ant in the U. S. Marine Corp and at present stationed at the 
Marine Barracks in Washington. D. C. 



Theology — Joseph K. Peaslee. '39. a former track himmaiv ami 
citizenship winner, is in his second year at the Lutheran Then 
logical Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Maryland's '41 Football Team Just About Plays Up To Its Assets; 
Eight In Last Game As Washington And Lee Is Beaten, 6 To 



Maryland's football season is over and 
now speculation runs rampant as to 1942. 
W c'll pass up that until something official 
is done and try to stick to concrete facts. 
The Terps played consistently good all- 
around football in beating Washington 
and Lee in the last tilt, 6 to 0. 

The Terps won only three games, tied 
one and lost five but even that was an im- 
provement over the previous three years 
and, except for one small slip, was just 
about as well as they could reasonably 
have been expected to do. 

In the preseason figuring, it appeared 
safe to count triumphs over Hampden- 
Sydney and Western Maryland, chalk up 
defeats at the hands of Duke, Penn and 
Georgetown, all vastly superior in man- 
power, and to grab off a couple of other 
victories out of the meetings with Florida, 
Rutgers, V. M. I. and Washington and 
Lee, even though all of these four, except 
the last named, were better supplied with 
high-caliber material. 

Tie With Terrors Hurts 

Maryland took care of Hampden-Sydney 
easily, its only real failure being against 
Western Maryland, which it soundly out- 
played in getting a 6-6 tie. Florida and 
Washington and Lee were beaten among 
those rated within reach of the Terps and 
the only fair complaints about any of the 
losing games, to V. M. I. and Rutgers in 
addition to Duke, Penn and Georgetown, 
were that the scores were too high. 

The Terps, like any squad with a small 
amount of usable material, were badly 
hampered by injuries. Lou Hesson, a prom- 
ising soph end, was put out before the 
season started with an injury in scrimmage 
against George Washington; Jack Gilmore, 
a letter-man wingman, was eliminated with 
a broken bone in his left foot in the Duke 
tilt, the third of the season, and in the 
finale against Washington and Lee, George 
Jarmoska, center; Max Hunt and Jack Ditt- 
mar, tackles, and Jack Wright, fullback, 



were sitting on the bench in civilian 
clothes. All other games, while not so bad 
as the last one, found the team minus de- 
pendables. 

Eight Dependables Lost 

Eight of those who played large roles 
this year will be missing next Fall, five line- 
men and three backs. They are Ralph Bur- 
lin and Max Hunt, tackles; John Morton 
and Frank Heyer, guards; Jim Wharton, 
center, and John Cordyack, Mearle Du- 
Vall and Bernie Ulman backs. All, except 
Hunt, rated as regulars. 

Burlin was outstanding and all the oth- 
ers were consistently good performers, 
Wharton, who played the entire final game 
with a bad leg, being particularly impress- 
ive for his 163 pounds. Cordyack, scaling 
five pounds more, stood out as a blocker 
and defensive player and caught two passes 
for scores. 

Of other players who figured, Maryland 
is to retain Bob James, Duke Alexander, 
Luther Conrad, and Jack Gilmore, ends; 
Reggy Vincent and Jack Dittmar, tackles; 
Hal Berry and Eddie Chovanes, guards; 
George Jarmoska, center, and Elmer Rig- 
by, Jack Mier, Tom Mont, Jack Wright, 
George Barnes, Lou Chacos, Joe Hoopen- 
gardner and Jack Brenner, backs. 

Bill Taylor, center, and Bill Helbock, 
blocking back, who did not see action, also 
may be rated in the assets, and Hesson 
also will resume at end. 

Needed Weight Coming Up 

This is a pleasing array, except for the 
fact that it lacks the line poundage that 
told so heavily against the Terps this year. 
In fact, this was the main reason for most 
of the big scores run up against them. 

If all goes well some badly needed 
weight for the forward wall will come up 
from the 1941 frosh, who should provide 
a half-dozen or so able linemen and three 
highly promising backs. Four yearling line 
products go above 200 and three others 
scale over 190. 



Of course, there is the question of de- 
fense service for some of the upper class- 
men and some of the rookies doubtless will 
fall by the wayside scholastically. 

All things considered, though, the out- 
look for 1942 appears brighter than this 
season, especially if at least three or four 
of the big frosh linemen produce. In fact, 
with the revamped schedule that leaves off 
Penn and Georgetown and contains Duke 
as the only powerhouse, five victories 
should be counted upon as a minimum 
with six as a possibility. 

Not "Big-Time" Array 

But the squad is far from "big-time," 
for, as in big business, if you want "big- 
time" stuff, you have to make "big-time" 
investments. 

In fact, as we see it, after having our 
nose in Maryland football for nigh on to 
30 years, the only fellow who might have 
had greater success with the grid ma- 
terial at hand this year in lieu of the 
schedule, happens to be the prexy of the 
University. He's the fellow, too, who'll 
have to decide the future of football at 
College Park and we don't envy him his 
task. 

It's very difficult, in fact, just about im- 
possible, to have consistently winning foot- 
ball teams without some lowering of the 
scholastic standards or investing around 
$40,000 for talent in addition to the coach- 
ing. That is the deduction made many 
times in the past and only recently by a 
big Dixie school old grad who was telling 
fellow alumni "wolves" where to get off. 
And to get a "big-time" coach at "big- 
time" pay you have to assure him "big- 
time" materials before you can get his 
autograph. 

Cordyack Is Honor Man 

"Student" football is well exemplified at 
Maryland in the case of Cordyack. He 
worked two years after finishing high 
(Continued on Next Page) 






8 



NOVEMBER 



1941 



Smith Does Good Job 
With Frosh Gridmen 

Although winning only one game in five, 
Bob Smith did a good job of coaching the 
rather green freshman football squad. The 
team improved greatly toward the finish 

and defeated the Washington and l.ee 
yearlings in the final. 6 to 0. 

Previously George Washington frosh 
had been outplayed and tied and defeats 
were suffered at the hands of the V. M. I. 
and Georgetown rookies and the power- 
house Navy Plebes. 

Paul Flick, 202-pound center, and I In 
bey Werner, 165-pound back, were the 
leading Tcrp yearlings, but there were 
others of much promise. 

Among these, with weights, are: Jack 
Hufman (175). end; John Lookabaugh 
(208), Ralph Higgins (208) and Douglas 
Fields (215), tackles; Howard Smedley 
(193), Bob Pcrilla (194) and Oscar Du- 
bois (190), guards; Lloyd Mallonee (1""). 
who played center but who probably will 
be shifted to blocking back next Fall; 
George Hill (189) and Jim Wissinger 
(178), backs. 

Fields, who is 6 feet 3 in addition to his 
bulk, is a brother of Tommy, the great 
runner, who stands 5 feet 10 and scales 
145. He is from Hyattsville and never 
played football before this Fall. 
• 

Maryland Soccer Team 
Shares Top In Nation 

Maryland's soccer team shared the honor 
of being one of two unbeaten outfits in the 
country during the past season with eight 
triumphs and two ties. Springfield College 
is the other institution with a clean slate. 

The Terps played deadlocks with Navy 
and Temple, the first being scoreless and 
the other ending 1-1. Only two points 
were scored against Maryland, Western 
Maryland getting the other in a 3-1 Terp 
victory. 

Bob Fetters, Maryland goalie, is rated 
all- America. 

Coincidentally, Floyd Werner, Mary- 
land's coach, who was on the job for the 
first season, is a Springfield product. 



1941 Maryland Frosh Grid Squad 



Name 


Po 




111 


Wl 


School 


Koma 


Richard Metzlcr 


E. 


19 


| 1 


180 


Roo evelt 


ton D. C. 


Thomas Brandt 


B 


IK 


B-3 


185 


CoUega 


Baltimore, lid 


Jack Hufman 


E. 


18 


6 


175 


dale 


town, Pa 


Robert Filippclli 


E. 


17 


6-1 tt 


170 


Calvert ii.ni 


Baltimore, Md. 


Ralph Higglxu 


T. 


21 


6-4 


208 


I'eekskill M A 


u., i) c 


John Lookabaugh 


T. 


19 


6-4 


208 


Rldgelay 


Rldgeley, w Va 


Francis Nechey 


T. 


20 


G 


185 


Charlotte Hall 


Baltimore, Md. 


John Ruppersberger T. 


17 


6 


196 


CatonevUle 


Caton -.iiif. Md. 


Douglas Fields 


T. 


19 


6-3 


215 


I Ivan 


.Hi.-. 6U 


Howard Smedley 


G. 


19 


6-2 


198 


St. Pauls 


Baltimore, Md 


Bob Perilla 


G. 


19 


5-8 


191 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md 


Oscar DuBois 


G. 


17 


5-10',i 


190 


Brldgeton 


Bridgeton. N. J. 


C. Compher, Jr. 


G. 


18 


5-9'i 


175 


Mackenzee 


it Mich. 


Boyd Ferris 


G. 


19 


5-8 


170 


Manlius 


Rochester. N. Y. 


Paul Flick 


C. 


17 


6-3 


202 


Marlinsburg 


Martinab'g, w. Va. 


Lloyd Mallonee 


C.-B. 


20 


5-10 


177 


Forest Park 


Baltimore. Md. 


Bill Byrd 


B. 


18 


5-10'/2 


195 


McDonogh 


College Park, Md. 


George Hill 


B. 


18 


6-2 


189 


Wicomico 


Salisbury. Md. 


Jim Wissinger 


B. 


19 


6-1 


178 


Ferndale 


Johnstown. Pa. 


James Thomas 


B. 


18 


6-2 


170 


St. Andrew's 


Baltimore. Md. 


Robert Case 


B. 


17 


6 


167 


Towson 


Towson. Md. 


Robert Schnebley 


B. 


18 


6 


165 


Hagerstown 


Hagerstown, Md. 


William Gruber 


B. 


18 


5-8 


164 


Catonsville 


Halelhorpe, Md. 


Hubert Werner 


B. 


19 


5-10 


164 


Collingswood 


Collingswood. N. J. 


Charles Dove 


B. 


20 


5-6 


160 


G. W. High 


Alexandria. Va. 


Edward Johnson 


B 


18 


6-1 


157 


City College 


Baltimore. Md. 



FOOTBALL 

(Continued from Preceding Page) 
school to get money enough to enter the 
University and has toiled each Summer and 
during the school term to keep going, yet 
he's an honor student in the College of 
Engineering, the toughest of them all. 

As someone said, "They'll be hearing of 
Cordyack as an engineer long after most 
of the all-America football players are for- 
gotten." 

So football offers its many-sided prob- 
lems for a collegiate institution and we 
doubt if anyone is more familiar with them 
than Dr. Curley Byrd. He's welcome to 
the job of handling the situation. 
Really A Tough Task 

As for football coaching, unless a fel- 
low is a "big-timer" with a "big-time" 
salary and is able to make a comfortable 
living in any other way, he's just plumb 
crazy for fooling with it, in our humble 
opinion. It's mostly all knocks and surely 
few get much fun out of it. 

Some of the gridders realize the worth 
and pleasure of the game without being 
"big-time." During the last week of the 
Maryland season one of the leading junior 
players remarked: "I don't think I'll play 
next year if there is a new coach. I'd hate 
to go from the 'Student Bowl' to the 
Rose Bowl in such a quick jump." 

As for the average critical Alumnus, he 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 



Maryland, 18; Hampden Sydney, 0. 

Mankind, 6; Western Maryland, 6. 

Maryland, 0; Duke, 50. 

Manland, 13; Florida. 12. 

Mankind, 6; Pennsylvania, 55. 

0; Rutgers, 21. 

0; Georgetown, 26. 

0; V. M. I.. 27. 

6; Washington and Lee, 0. 



Maryland, 
Maryland, 

Maryland, 

Maryland. 



FROSH GRID RECORD 

Maryland, 7; V. M. I.. 32. 

Mankind. 6; George Washington, 6. 

Maryland, 12; Navy Plebes, 45. 

Maryland, 0; Georgetown, 18. 

Maryland, 6; Washington and Lee. 0. 



BOXING SCHEDULE 

(Corrected) 

Jan. 10 — South Carolina. 

Jan. 17 — Coast Guard Academy at New 

London. Conn. 
Jan. 24 — Western Maryland. 
Jan. 31 — University of Virginia. 
Feb. 7— Catholic U. at Washington. 
Feb. 14— Virginia Tech (All-U Night). 
Feb. 21— North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Feb. 27-28 — Southern Conference Tourney. 



can tell what's wrong and how to cure it 
at no cost to liim and then chime in with. 
"You haven't got a couple tickets to Sat- 
urday's game, have you?" 

Some of the very best "advisers" come 
from the ranks of those who were excess 
baggage on athletic teams. Those who were 
stars seldom arc "second guessers " 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS 

GRAPEVINE NEWS about those we know 



FOOD FOR FREEDOM 

In North Carolina's "Food for Freedom" program 
three Maryland graduates are playing major roles — R. 
H. Ruffner, '08, head of the Department of Animal 
Industry; Roy S. Dearstyne, '17, head of the Poultry 
Department, and Fred M. Haig, '18, Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry, all of North Carolina State College, Raleigh. 

These men are blazing the trail that the Tar Heel 
farmer must follow if "food for feed" is to replace "leaf 

and lint" in that great agricultural State. 

o o o 
Steel — J. Hanson Mitchell, '98, past president of the Alumni 
Association, is Plant Engineer for the Eastern Rolling Mill Co. 



Director — Edwin Semler, '22, a former football and baseball 
luminary, now is Director of Athletics at Hagerstovvn High School. 
Eddy also has an interest in the Semler-McFaddin Sporting Goods 
Company in Hagerstown, Md. 

O 

Married — J. Hanson Mitchell, Jr., '33, and Miss Katherine 
Williams of Orwigsburg, Pa., were married in June. They are living 
in Washington, where John is Assistant District Attorney for the 
District of Columbia. 

O 

Married — Miss Anne Wilson of Aberdeen, Md., and Fielding 
Lewis Mitchell, '35, son of J. Hanson Mitchell, Sr., '98. Miss 
Wilson flew to Quayaquil, Ecuador, and they were married there. 
Lewis is employed by the Continental Petroleum Company, Ltd., 
in Ecuador. 



Dentist — George M. Anderson, '19, D.D.S., is a well-known 
dentist with offices located on Park Ave., in Baltimore City, 
o o o 

Film — William A. Stanton, '36, is a Research Chemist for the 
DuPont Film Manufacturing Corp. in Parlin, N. J. 
O O 

Chemist — Thomas W. Mears, '39, is a Junior Chemist with the 
National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C. 

Banker — John P. Mailer)', '16, is a banker in San Francisco, 
Calif. 

O O O 

Author — Bryant Alden Long, '34, is in the Railway Mail Serv- 
ice, also he is a writer of action stories for boys. Bryant has sold 
the manuscript of a book entitled "The Gorge of Golden Mys- 
tery" which will be published next spring. The synopsis indicates 
quite an interesting and exciting story of adventure and mystery. 
He resides in Hyattsville, Md., at 4204 Gallatin St. 
o o o 

Telephone — W. Elliott Stevens, '15, a telephone engineer, is 
with the Bell Telephone Laboratories, N. Y., with the title of 
checker. He resides at Port Washington, Long Island. 
O 

Medical— Dr. W. C. Miller, '15, of Gaithersburg, Md., has 
been elected president of the Montgomery County Medical So- 
ciety. 



Medical — Dr. James Kerr, '39, M.D., is married and now is 
practicing in Damascus, Md. 



Virgin Island — Rachel Halet. now Mrs. Douglas Armstrong, 
is a resident on the Virgin Island. Mr. Armstrong is employed in 
Government work there. 



Married — Miss Dorothy Millar, '37, a member of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, and Lieut. Harvey Cook, '38, former football 
manager, were married September 27, last, in Washington. Lieu- 
tenant Cook is stationed at Camp Polk, Louisiana, where the 
newlyweds will make their home. 

o o 

Army — Lieut. Raymond "Buddy" Goodhart, '36, entered the 
Army in 1940 and served under Gen. Lindsay Silvester, '11, at 
Fort Knox, Kentucky, in the tank unit. Recently Goodhart was 
sent to Fort Lewis. Washington. "Buddv" married Miss Mary 
Keller, 36. 

o o o 

Marines — E. Wayne Fitzwalter, '39, now is a lieutenant in 
the U. S. Marine Corps and stationed at the Training Center at 
Quantico, Va. Wayne wants a football, basket ball and boxing 
schedule. Leave it to the Marines! Recently "Fitz" visited the 
campus. 



Army — Walter V. Nichols, '44, a former student, now is located 
at Camp Wallace, Texas. He writes for news from the campus 
and letters from fellow Alumni. 

O O 

China — From across the Pacific comes a letter from Mason 
Chronister, '40, the fleet-footed trackster of recent years, who now 
is a lieutenant in the U. S. Marine Corps and stationed in 
Shanghai, China. His address is Company B, 4th Marines, Asiatic 
Station, care Postmaster, San Francisco, Calif, 
o o o 

Teaching — Miss Lillian E. Bunker, '31, is head of the Com- 
mercial Department at the Andrew Murray Vocational School 
in Charleston, S. C. 



Married — Miss Alice Taylor, '30, and Mr. John Jacob Unkles, 
were married August 16th, last, in Havre de Grace, Md. Brides- 
maid was Miss Lenore Taylor and best man was Mr. Morton 
Taylor, '42, and president of Alpha Tau Omega. Mrs. Unkles 
was a teacher and librarian at Elkton High School before her 
marriage. Mr. Unkles is a graduate of Lehigh University. The 
newlyweds now reside at Welsh Road, Essex Falls, N. J. 


Army — Lieut. C. J. Wittier, '38, LL.B., is Personal Adjutant 
with the 701st Military Police Battalion at Fort Snelling, Minn. 


Married — Miss Mary Elizabeth Rawley, '39, and Mr. Richard 
H. Flowers, '35, were married August 19 last in Hyattsville. Mrs. 
Flowers was an outstanding student in the Women's Physical 
Education work. Dick Flowers is with the United States Bureau 
of Fisheries. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. James Outhouse announce the arrival of 
a son who will be called Robert Burton. The young man arrived 
July 19, last. Mrs. Outhouse was formerly Miss Louise Reinohl, 
'34, of Hyattsville. Mr. Outhouse is in the Agriculture Depart- 
ment of the University. They reside at 5610 35th Avenue, Hy- 
attsville, Maryland. 

o o 

Physician — Dr. Joseph A. Sedlack, '30, is a practicing physi- 
cian in Towson, Md. 



10 




EVENTS 



(charter JJaij L^etebraUon 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, L942 

LORD BALTIMORE HOTEL 



Banquet, Floor Show and Dance 



Price - $2.50 per person 



Make Table Reservations Early with Your College Dean 

or Alumni Office 






ALL - UNIVERSITY SHOW 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1942 

Ritchie Coliseum, 
College Park 

B a s k et Ball 
Extra-Curricular Show 

Boxing 



RESERVED SEATS 



1.10 



Write Alumni Office or Athletic Office for 
Reservations 



HEADQUARTERS 

for Good Times 
Cshe bow Jjaitimore <Jtolel 

700 comfortable 
rooms, two restaurants, bar and luxurious 
Cocktail Lounge at your service. 

Charter Day: 
Saturday, January 17, 1942 

Ojn iaeai place to entertain 

C/^/ $3 TO $6 SINGLE 

LORD BALTIMORE 

KjtoteL 



BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



MAKE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 1942 GOLDEN REUNION 

Contribute To The TERRAPIN PARTY 



Fellow Alumni: 

I wish to be a contributing member of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation, and am enclosing the usual 
' amount of $2.00 for the year 1941-1942; 
of this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
scription to the Alumni News. 



Z PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW! 



Name 


Class 


Occupation 


Address 




Married? .. .. To whom 




Children 


Business address 




.... Title _ 








MARJORIE WOODWORTH 

Chesterfield's Girl of the Month 

in the Hal Roach hit 

"All-American Co-ed" 

a United Artists Release 







lass around the Chesterfields and 
it's pleasure time for everybody . . . smoking; 
pleasure that only the right combination of 
the world's best cigarette tobaccos can give you. 

Lthesterfields make good friends . . . they're 
milder, definitely better-tasting and cooler-smok- 
ing. Everybody who smokes them likes them. 





Convru'lll 10-11 I tr.r.iTT .1' Mv 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



C - 

o X 

d *- 

o ci 

en tj 

>> c-< 

J- r-i 

c o 






DECEMBER, 1941 




5fcXrtT3??EeXB?5H ^^k 


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ill 1 


mm mm i»ni 'j —^ h 


■^a. «. II,.. 






* , 1 !,, : , , , :^1»«N 
1,1 'l-iLLj.r'j 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, DECEMBER, 1941 



Numb 



inner / 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

}. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Loncridge, '29 Education 

J. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of .Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary. Frederick, Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32. Secretary, Oakland. Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

President Dr. Ernest N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 



James W. Stevens, 
Myron B. Stevens, 



'27.. 



..Vice-President Edwin E. Powell, '13 Historian 



SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 

Football Frank Hawkins, '34 Boxing 

Baseball Dr. Buckey Clemson. D.D.S., '21 

Lacrosse Iamks M. Swartz. '19 

Basket Ball [erre H. Sullivan, '21 At Large 

Track Dr. A. W. Valentine, M.D. '04 

Tennis Lee Pennington '15 

Cross Country G. F. Pollock, '23 



W. M. Kisiipaugii, '17 

Eddie Semi.er, '23 

Tilghman B. Marden, '25.. 

II. B. Shipley, '14 

Seymour W. Ruff. '17 

Egbert Tingley, '27 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 



COVER PICTURE 

One of the familiar campus scenes in 
the good old winter time. This picture is 
from the old part of the campus and is 
probably better known than any other spot. 
With campus expansion there will be more 
views which we will take this winter, pro- 
vided Mother Nature puts down the white 
blanket. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 






We arc beginning a New Year and my 
first thought is to express my gratitude for 
the interest taken by fellow Alumni dur- 
ing the past year and in the same thought 
request every Alumnus to make a resolu- 
tion to be more active in the coming year. 
With concerted Alumni interest the year 
1942 should be the greatest in our history, 
especially as it is the Fiftieth Anniversary 
of the founding of this Association. The 
celebration will take place June 5. 

Many of our fellow Alumni are now on 
active duty for our country both at home 
and abroad. You will note elsewhere in 
this issue the long list of those so far 
known who are in the armed forces of the 
U. S. Look the list over and those you 
know or have friends who know, drop them 
a line. We want to keep this list up to 
date. Give us your help. 

With the best of wishes to every one 
for a great New Year, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Army — John G. Reckord, '41, is a sec- 
ond lieutenant in Uncle Sam's Army and 
has been ordered to the Philippines. He 
has been at Fort Benning with the Fourth 
Division, Motorized. Reckord was Colonel 
of the R. O. T. C. Unit last year. 



Army — Lieut, and Mrs. Merle Preble, 
'40, visited the campus. Merle, former 
Colonel of the R. O. T. C. Cadet Corps. 
now is in active duty and lias been ordered 
to Fort Benning, Ga., for maneuvers. Mrs. 
Preble was formerly Miss Louise Mercer. 
The Prebles were at Fort Dix. 



<§a+ne 9 ^illcaiia^L^ ofi tUe PteAestt Ga+tjjLct 



h\ W. \1 Gewehr, Professoj oi History 



It has been mj firm conviction for sonic tunc tliat sooner 01 
later involvement of the United States in the present world con 
flict would be inevitable. I have been among those who have ap 
proved unstintingly the policy of the Administration in giving 

all out aid to Britain and her allies I he sudden attack l>v Japan 
is full vindication for the President's policy. 1 could never under 
stand how one could rationalize himself into being an isolationist 
in the face of the rising tide of totalitarianism with its avowed 
challenge to the free way of life. Again and again Hitler and Ylusso 
lini have hurled their challenges our way, linking us with "the 
[ewish-capitalist world" which was temporarily blocking the wav 
of the "young nations and systems" to whom the future mcv ltablv 
belonged. As Hitler put it: "Every power that dines off these dc 
mocracies will die with them. When Churchill and his interna 
tional democratic comrades declare that they are defending their 
world and that their world cannot exist beside ours then that is 
only their misfortune. The German world, the same as the Italian 
world, has overcome the era of privilege of a few plutocratic cap- 
italists and placed the era of the people in its stead. ... In the 
battle of plutocratic privilege against the national socialist people's 
rights, the latter will be victorious." 

So, too, when Mussolini entered the war against France he 
stated that "proletarian fascist Italy" was taking the field against 
the plutocratic and reactionary democracies in a "conflict of 
fruitful, useful peoples against peoples who are in a decline. It is 
the conflict between two ages, two ideas." That Mussolini in- 
cluded us as one of those decadent peoples who still clung to "the 
stinking corpse of democracy" is revealed in the avidity with which 
he mimicked Hitler in declaring war against the United States. 

I never have had any confidence that we could insulate our- 
selves against these sinister forces of totalitarianism in Europe or 
that the appeasement of Japan would bring us anything but regret. 
A year ago last summer I was on a committee to urge the State 
Department to place a complete embargo of war materials to 
Japan. The only justification I could ever see for aiding the Jap- 
anese to conquer China was that we were not readv and feared a 
war with that nation. But why we should have gone to such lengths 
in preparing Japan in the event of a war against ourselves was 
clear only to our diplomats. At the same time they cannot feel so 
complacently smug about their program now. 

In support of my statement that sooner or later we must become 
involved in war either against Japan or Germany I point to certain 
fundamental conditions of America's past security. 

In the first place, the United States has never been redly iso- 
lationist when the grand strategy of defense has become involved. 
Even the oft-quoted Washington in his Farewell Address, while 
referring to the fact that Europe has a primary set of interests 
foreign to us, also said: "Hence therefore it must be unwise in 
us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissi- 
tudes of her politics or the ordinary combinations and collisions 
of her friendships or enmities." At this very time the United States 
was an ally of France. Would Washington regard the present-day 
phenomenon of totalitarianism as one of the "ordinary vicissitudes" 
of Europe's politics? Jefferson, too, is often quoted as a consistent 
advocate of isolation. In 1822 when Monroe was undecided as to 
whether we should go it alone or invite England as a partner in 
announcing the Monroe Doctrine, Jefferson advised that "we 
should most sedulously cherish a cordial friendship with Britain 
because with her on our side we need not fear the whole world." 
He was even ready to risk a war in order to gain Anglo- American 
solidarity. 



W Ink it is true that tin United State b; reason ol I 

and its republican institut s has cherished the ideal of isolation, 

mii statesmen have alw.ivs realized that a fundamental factoi ill 
our seciuitv w.is the balance of powei in Europi thai ■ tern of 
alliances and alignments among the powers of Europe bj whi 
one powei oi group of powers should be allowi trong 

enough to wield unquestioned domination of the continent and 
the adjacent se.is In 1802 when Napoleon, beginning Ins phenom 
cn.il e.iicei nt conquest in Europe, was contemplal ration 

of the French Empire in Louisiana. Jefferson wioti I he dav that 

France takes possession of New Orleans . we must m.nrv 

Ourselves to the British fleet and nation. It is tine that Spain, 
which had just sold Louisiana to Napoleon, was a gic.it world 

power controlling even most of the western hemisphere, vet it 
was no military clanger to our security as it was a decadent power. 
Jefferson later expressed such fear of Napoleon that he stated 
that even our military intervention might be preferable to a Na 
poleonic victor) by which he might conquer Russia "and lav thus 
at his feet the whole continent of Europe. This done England 
would be but a breakfast . . . No it cannot be to our interest 
that all Europe should be reduced to a single monarchy." 

Throughout our history we have profited from the strife in 
Europe over the balance of power. Indeed it is impossible to con- 
ceive that we could otherwise have become a world power in the 
nineteenth century or ever have successfully maintained our Mon- 
roe Doctrine. Great Britain, the one power winch could have- 
thwarted us bv reason of her sea power, has, since ISIS, always 
found it to be to her advantage and interest to remain on peaceable 
if not always friendly terms with the United States because of her 
much greater concern to maintain the balance of power in Eu- 
rope. Without this factor it is inconceivable that we should have 
become a great World Power without having a great military and 
naval establishment in the nineteenth century. And yet we had 
accumulated our empire by 1900! 

Along with the strife of Europe and the benevolent attitude of 
Britain there have been two other factors in our security. One of 
these was geographical isolation. Flanked by two oceans we might 
well feel secure as long as the friendly British navy took c are of the 
Atlantic, and there was no sea power on the Pacific to challenge 
us. It is perfectly clear to all of us that m our grand strategy of 
defense we did not consider it necessary to develop a two ocean 
navv until the destruction of Britain by Hitler seemed imminent 
It was the realization of the consequence to us of the possible 
destruction of British sea power, rather than any particular love 
of England, that led to the lend lease program and the abandon 
ment of neutrality. 

The other bulwark essential to our security was the universal 
acceptance of certain principles of international law and deccnev 
such as the recognition of the sanctity of treaties and the accept 
ance of the principles of the Kellogg Briand pact which might 
serve to ordain an international order based upon law rather than 
upon force. 

To bring our discussion to a conclusion, it is perfectly clear that 
with the rise of the totalitarian Rome Berlin axis in Europe and its 
blatant, swaggering oriental ally. Japan, all the bulwarks of our 
security and all the vital factors in our grand stratcuv of defense 
were suddenly undermined. The balance of power on the conti 
nent of Europe (but, thanks to the British navy, not on the ad 
jae cut seas') was decisively overthrown by Hitler. British sea powei 
itself was threatened with annihilation bv Hitler's all out aerial 
offensive. The utterlv unscrupulous Continued on /'aeic ; 



MARYLAND ALUMNI ON ACTIVE DUTY 

We arc listing below the names of University of Maryland men who are in the Services, as compiled from 
the returned Alumni questionnaires which were sent out during the last month. As other questionnaires are re- 
turned we expect to list in future issues the names and stations of other Maryland men who are on active duty. 



UNITED STATES ARMY 

Allen, George Damon. '40 First Lieut., Office Chief of Air Corps. War 

Department, Washington, i>. C. 
Ai.barasm. Ralph Joseph, '40 First Lieut., 893d Tank Destroyer B. X. 

i Hi. Fort George G Meade, Md. 

Bowman, Geokge Alfred, '38 Assistant Project Engineer, First Lieut., 
Charleston Quartermaster Project X., Charleston, S. C; Annapolis, 
Md. 

Burton, David Borden. '40 First Lieut., Quartermaster Office. Kort 
Belvoir, Va. 

Beveridge, Andrew 1!.. '36 First Lieut., J. A. (1. D.. no address. 

BacKRAUS, Albert P., '38 First Lieut.. Corps of Engineers, War De- 
partment. I'. S. Engineer Office, Sth Floor, Standard Oil Bldg., Bal- 
timore. Md. 

Brothers. Mat rice F. — Major, no address. 

BAILEY, Howard Monroe. '41 Private. Fort Myer. Va. 

Bvrd. Harry CLIFTON, Jr., '36 First Lieut.. 57th Infantry Brigade, Fort 
l)ix. New Jersey. 

Barnes, Richard Kenneth. Jr.. '40— Battalion Adjutant, Headquarters; 
Third Battalion, 111th Infantry. Indiantown Gap, Pa. 

Booth e. John Edw \kd. Jr.. '37 — First Lieut.. Fort Geo. G. Meade, Md. 

Beall, William Robert, '36 First Lieut., Military Department. Univer- 
sity of Maryland. College Park. Md. 

Cotterman, Haroi.d F. , Jr. '40 — Second Lieut.. Air Corps Replacement 
Center. Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

Crawford. Thomas Brooks. '26 Captain, Edgewood Arsenal, Edge- 

wood. Md. 

CRUMP, Ralph F.. 41 -Lieut. (Property Officer). O. C. Q. M.. Indian- 
town Gap. Pa. 

('line. Carl A.. Jr., '41 Second Lieut., Company "H", Sth Infantry. 
Camp Gordon, Ga. 

Carter. Harry Enlow, '34 -First Lieut., Q. M. C, (Personnel Officer), 
Hq. 7th Regt., Camp Lee. Va. 

Conk. Robert IL. '30- Captain. Field Artillery. Fort Bragg. N. C. 

Chapman, Ray Francis, '35 — First Lieut., Military Reservation, Indian 
town (iap. Pa. 

Cutler, William Vickery, '18 — No title, no address. 

DeMarr, James Donald, ',50 — Captain, Signal Office. Quarry Heights, 
Canal Zone. 

Dinning. Robert Edward, '33 — First Lieut., Camp Forrest, Tenn. 

Doscn. Harry Albert. Jr.. '37 — First Lieut.. Company "B", 2nd In- 
fantry Tnq. Bn., Camp Wheeler. Macon. Ga. 

Eaton. Ernest R., Jr.. '36 First Lieut., 80th Armored Regiment (M), 

Pine (amp, X. V. 
Ely. James Henry, Jr.. '39- Captain. Holabird Quartermaster Depot, 

United States Army. 

Fellows. Pail DeWitt, '32 — First Lieut., Air Corps Advanced Flying 

School, Moultrie, Ga. 
Freeny, James E., '33- Private. Fort George G. Meade. 
Foster. Vernon Royston. '40 -Second Lieut., no address. 



198th C. A., East 



Gordon, James Miller, '30- Captain, Battery- 
Hartford, Conn. 

Gibson. Hatcher Roome, '32- Lieut.. Office of Quartermaster General, 
R. R. R. Building, Washington, D. C. 

Gunter, John B., Jr.. '41 — Private, no address. 

Gupton. Ewing 1... Jr., '.19 — No title, no address. 

Gynn, Thomas S.. Jr.. '34 — Private. Camp Lee. Va. 

Gordon, Jack Lewis, '41 -Private, Camp Wheeler, Ga. (Anti-Tank Out- 
fit, 5th Battalion. Company "A".) 

Harryman. Thomas Daniel. '38 Second Lieut. 0-351108. Company "M", 
109th Infantry (R), A. P. (). .'8. Indiantown Gap Military Res., Pa. 

Hess, Kenneth Samuel, '40 -Corporal, Company "B", 3rd Medical Bat- 
talion. Camp Lee. Va. 

Harvey, Cecil Lee, '39 First Lieut.. 176th Field Artillery, A. P. O. 29, 
Fort George G. Meade, Md. 

Hii.der, PETER FROST, '36 First Lieut., Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 
War Department. Washington. D. C. 

Hammerlund, Roberi Otto, '37 First Lieut., Post Headquarters, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

Haase, Thomas Nelson, '41 Private, 3rd Tr. Bn., Company "D", Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

Hewitt, Frederic Marcv, '41- -Second Lieut., Engineer School Staff and 
Faculty, Fort Belvoir, Va. 

lIvRi. GEORGE ('., '36 First Lieut., 2nd St. Training Battalion, Company 
"G", Fort Benning, Ga. 

Hen NIG, Elmer Albert, '37 First Lieut., 1321st Service Unit, Fort 
Eustis, Va. 

Howard. William Franklin, '39— Second Lieut., 703rd M. P. Battalion, 
Arlington, Va. 

Hambi.eion. Harry BaLKLEY, Jr.. '40— Second Lieut.. 518th Military- 
Police Battalion. Fort Jay, X. Y. 

Hall, Austin, Jr., '3d First Lieut.. Area Engineer, Building 202, Fort 
Myer. Va. 

Hoover, Lawrence Grance, Jr. -Sergeant, Army War College, Wash- 
ington, D. ('. 

Hopfman, Charles GILBERT, '33 Senior Inspector. Public Works Office. 
United States Naval Academy, 

Jannarone. Lewis Henry, '39 First Lieut., Camp Gordon, Ga. 



KELLY, David Cleveland, Jr.. '41 Second Lieut.. Company "H", 26th 

Infantry, First Division. Fort Devena, Mass. 
Kelly, Harold L., Jr., '37 -Military Instructor, Military Department. 

University of Maryland. College Park. Md. 

LEONARD, James David, '40 — Private. 29th Division Headquarters. Fort 

George G. Meade, Md 
Ludwic, Charles Herbert, '35 — First Lieut., Office Chief of Ordnance, 

Washington, D. C. 
Lines, William Fuller. '32— No title, Fort Knox. 
LoCKRIDGE, Robert William. '30 — Captain. Ravenna Ordnance Plant. 

Ravenna, Ohio. 
Linger, Roland A., '34 — Captain, no address. 
Lann, Joseph S., '37 — Lieut., New York Office of the Office of Export 

Control, Economic Defense Board, War Department. 
Lanigan, James M., Jr., '41 — Lieut., 6th Company, Armored Force School. 

Fort Knox, Ky. 
Livingston, Gordon H., '34- First Lieut.. 56th Ordnance Company (Am.), 

Nansemond Ordnance Depot. Portsmouth, Va. 
Lanham. Paul Trueman, '40 Second Lieut.. Research and Engineer Div. 

of the Office of Chief of Ordnance, Washington. D. C. 
Leasure, William Carlton, '37 — Lieut., Pittsburgh Ordnance District. 

1202 Chamber of Commerce Building. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Morgan, Charles Everett, '37 — Private, Drew Field. Tampa. F!a. 
Mellen, Luther E., Jr., '39 — Lieut., 34th Infantry, Fort Jackson. S, I 
Mai, Richard Everett. '41 — Private, Subsistence Office, Camp Living 

ston, La. 
McWilliams, William Jameson, '38 — First Lieut., Headuarters. 7tb 

Medical Training Battalion, Camp Lee, Va. 
McCi.ure, Charles J. R., '41 — Corporal, Troop C. 1st Training Squadron, 

C. R. T. C, Fort Riley, Kansas. 
Meakin, J. Leonard. '41 — Second Lieut.. 703d Military Police Battalion, 

Arlington Cantonment, Va. 
Mattingly, Robert D., '41 — Second Lieut., Fort George G. Meade, Md 
Murphy, Joseph M., '41 — Corporal, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. 
Miller, Joseph, '32 — First Lieut., Signal Corps, Camp Crowder, Mo. 
Marzolf. Joseph Mossler, Jr., '40 — Second Lieut.. 401st Signal Co. 

(Aviation), Boiling Field, Washington, D. C. 

Otten, Leonard John, Jr., '40 — Second Lieut.. G. H. Q., Army War 

College, Washington, D. C. 
Oakley, Ned H., '39 — First Lieut., Camp Croft, S. C. 

Propst. Cecil Loy. '27- -Captain, 60th Infantry. 9th Infantry Division. 

Fort Bragg. N. C. 
Pohlhaus, Joseph Xorbert. '40 Private, Coast Artillery, U. S. Army. 
Putman, Raymond Scott, '38 — Second Lieut., 17th Ordnance Battalion. 

Armored. Second Armored Division. 
Pi.umley, Walter Preston, '29 — First Lieut.. Chaplain, United States 

Army Reserve Corps. 

Rochkind, Joseph Max. '39 -Private, 1st Class. Company- "B", 104th 

Medical Regiment, Fort George G. Meade, Md. 
Rappleyf, Robert DuBois, '41 — Second Lieut., Col. 4th Reconnaissance 

Battalion. Fort Benning, Ga. 
Riley, Thomas Wise, '40 — First Lieut., Fort Monmouth. Red Bank, N. J. 
Richardson, Donald Wells, '38 — Clerk, Bureau of Yards and Docks, 

Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 

Scott, Elgin Wayne, Jr., '39 — Lieut.. War Department, Officer, Chief 

of Air Corps. Room 906, 818 H St.. X. VV., Washington, D. C. 
Sinsheimer, Maurice B., Jr., '37 — First Lieut., Headquarters, 1st Q. M. 

Salvage Depot, Camp Lee, Va. 
Smith, Leonard, '36 — First Lieut., Chemical Warfare Service, Bldg. F. 

23rd and D Sts., N. W., Washington. D. C. 
Sheibley, David F.. '40- Private, Fort Bragg, X. C, 

Silvester. Lindsay McD., '11 — Brigadier General, care of Adjutant Gen- 
eral, War Department. Washington. D. C. 
Shaky, Bowen Wood. '40 -Junior Engineer. U. S. Engineers, A. P. O. 

803, Port of Spain. Trinidad, B. W. J. 
Schutz, John L., '38 — Second Lieut.. 57th Brigade, 44th Division, Fort 

Dix, X. J. 
Sterling. Wilbur Frederick, '20 — Major, C. W. S., War Department 

Building. Washington, D. C. 
SMITH, Harold Walter, '38 — First Lieut., Company "A". 60th Infantry, 

Ninth Division, Fort Bragg, N. C. 
Saunders, Oswald H., '10 — Colonel, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 
SouLE, F"loyd Allison, '39 — Lieut., 16th Infantry, First Division, Fort 

Devens, Mass. 
Steinberg, Douglas S., '40 — Corporal, Headquarters Detachment, Special 

Troops, 29th Infantry. Div. Fort George G. Meade, Md. 
Seeley. George Edward, '39 — First Lieut., no address. 

Tyser. Rai pii Jay, '40 — Lieut., Holabird Quartermaster Depot, Balti- 
more, Md. 
Troxell, Harry Schaden. '30 Lieut.. Camp Lee. Va. 
Tai.cott, Worthington Heaton, '41 — Lieut., called to service Nov. 7, '41 
TbitBL, Louis M. D., '31- -Air Corps Basic Flying School, End, Okla. 

Worthington, Raymond Leroy, '41 — Private, Company "B", 1st Medical 

Training Battalion, Camp Lee, Va. 
Weber, George ()., '33 First Lieut.. S-2, 176th Infantry Regiment (R), 

Fort George G. Meade, Md. 
Watson. Thomas Eucene, Jr., '41 — Second Lieut.. Company "D", 60th 

Infantry. A. P. O. No. 9. Fort Bragg, N. C. 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Aeronautics — Miss Kathleen Shanahan, 
'41, is with the National Vdvisorj Commit- 
tee foi Aeronautics .it Langley Field. Miss 
Shanahan has seen Lieut. Frank Skotnicki, 
'40, who is with the Quartermaster Corps; 
P. Henry Essex, '39, an engineer in N V 
C. A., and George Lewis, '42. all of whom 
worked at Langley Field during the sum 
mer. 



Petroleum — Richard F. Kline. '33, is 

president of the Petroleum Transporta- 
tion Company with offices located in Fred- 
erick, Md. 

O 

Teacher — Miss Catherine Irenn.in. '34, 
is a school teacher in Baltimore. 

o 

Technician — Howard H. Fawcett, '40. 
is an Analytical Technician for the U. S 
Army at the Kankakee Ordnance Works 
in EKvood. 111. 




The above picture shows aviation cadets Earl I- Battan, 's2. of Washington, I ) C 
Pelham R Burnett. '41. and Ed. Boone Talbott, '41. now on tlieir last stretch r> 
receiving wings in the \astK expanded Aviation Corps Batten is al Randolph 1 ield and 
Burnett and Talbott are at Brook Field and Kellej Field, Texas 

Other Man landers in aviation training are Ensign Joseph S Russell. In, \ i\ d Re 
serves. Corpus Chnsti. Texas; lames II Barrett. Jr., '39, now it Coral Cables, I la . John 
M. Rodier. '37, now a Lieutenant in the \nnv Vviation; Eugene V Raphel, '^>. and 
John C. Bishop, 's6. both Lieutenants in the \iiny Air Coips 



MD. ALUMNI ON ACTIVE DUTY 

(Continued from Page 4) 
Walton, Robert I.., '38 Lieut., 23rd Infantry, Fort Sam Houston, Tex. 
Woodward, Charles William, Jr.. '41— -Acting Corporal, Battery "A", 

6th Battalion, 2nd F. A. Tng. Rgt.. F. A. R. T. C. Fort Bragg. N. C. 
Williamson. George Lewis. '36- -Private, 37th Signal Platoon, Savannah 

Army Air Base. Ga. 
Williams. Ralph L. '33 — Captain, R. O. T. C, University of Maryland, 

College Park. Md. 

ARMY AIR CORPS 

Ashman, Robert Edmond, '41- Private, Spec. 4 CI., 332nd School Squad- 

ron. Air Corps, Luke Field. Ari?. 
Alperstein. Benjamin. '39 — Second Lieut., Sheppard Field, Tex. 
Cranford. Leonard Carter, '40 — Aviation Cadet, I". S. Air Corps, no 

address. 
Clendaniel, Charles Elwood. Jr.- Private, Weather Observer, Jackson. 

Miss. 
Caldara, Joseph I)., '31— Captain, Boiling Field. D. C. 
DeMarco, James Arthur, '2 Q --Major. Randolph Field. Tex. 
Finton. James Robert. '41 —Second Lieut., Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio. 
Gannon, William Francis. '41— Second Lieut., B. O. Q., Randolph 

F'ield, Tex. 
Hart. William A., '36 — First Lieut., Carlstrom Field, Arcadia, Fla. 
Keller, Holly Martin, Jr., '41 — Cadet, Goodfellow Field. San Antonio. 

Texas. 
Keller, Ralph W., '38 — Lieut., no address. 

Lodman, William James, '41 — Flying Cadet. Home address, Moore, Mont. 
Marshall, Fred H.. '32 — Captain. Boiling F'ield, D. C. 
Mendelsohn, Irving Philip, '37 — First Lieut., 12th Observation Squad- 
ron, Fort Knox. Ky. 
MiFarland, Frank R., Jr.. '39 — Boiling Field, D. C. 
Thomas, Ramsay, '35 M.D. — Captain, 104th A. C. Observation Squadron. 

Detrick Field, Frederick, Md. 
Thatcher. John S., '41 — Second Lieut., Maxwell F'ield. Montgomery. Ala. 
Wagner. Ernest G., '41 — Second Lieut.. Sloan Field. Midland, Tex. 
Weber, Jack Edward, '41 — Cadet, Ocala, Fla. 
Simpson. John — First Lieut., Barksdale Field, La. 

UNITED STATES NAVY 

Axtell, Harold Abner — Ensign, at sea. 

Daily, Louis Eugene. '33 — Lieut., Navy Yard Disp.. Washington, D. C. 
Disharoon, Charles R.. '41 — Ensign E V (G), on U. S. Destroyer. 
Dressel, John Thomas, '34 — Ensign. Navy Yard. Washington, D. C 
Maynard. John F.. '36 — Ensign, U. S. Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C 
Osborn, James McClain, '37 — Ensign. Naval Ord. Plant, Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Lapoint, George Malcolm, '40 — Attending Midshipman's Training School, 

New York. Ensign after January 16, 1942. 
Seager, John Wesley, 'i2 — Lieut., junior grade, at sea. 
Suter, Walter Hart, '41 — Ensign, U. S. N. R., on active duty January 

1, 1942. 

NAVAL AVIATORS 

Faulkner Edgar Frederick, '41 — Cadet, New Orleans, La., until ap- 
proximately February 1, 1942, then Pensacola, Fla. 

Goldbeck, Page, '38 — Ensign, at sea on cruiser. Post Office, Pearl Har- 
bor, T. H. 

Hudgins, Houlder. '37 — Ensign, V. P. 72, Naval Air Station, Quonset 
Point, R. I. 

Jacques, Samuel Albert. '41 — Cadet, Aviation Cadet Quarters, N. A. S.. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

Slye, Robert, '36 — Lieut., at sea. 

UNITED STATES MARINES 

Bailey, Caleb Thayer. '2.5 — Major, Bourne Field, St. Thomas. Y. I. 



Bishopp, Fred Thomas. '39 Lieut., F-' 11th Regiment, First Marim I< 

vision, Marine Barracks, New River, N. ('. 
Cogswell. Charles Lamiurn, 36 First Lieut. II \ s>. Company, First 

Marines, F. M. I). F, M. F . Marine Barracks, Parris Island, S. • 
Dubel, Bernard, '17 Lieut. Col., Headquarters, U S Marine Corps, 

Washington. I). C. 
Fitzwater, Earl Wayne, '39 Second Lieut . Companj 'It ", T. I ' 

Quantico, Va. 
Chronister, Mason. '40 -Lieut., last address, China 
Miller, Norman Albert, Jr. Second Lieut., Marine Corps Basic School. 

Navy Yard, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Mueller, John Leo. '41 -Second Lieut.. <>th R O. < '.. Marine Bai 

Quantico, Va. 
McMahon, William V... '41 Second Lieut., Basic School, Marine Bar- 
racks, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Neiman. Robert. '39 — Second Lieut., 1st Scout Company. F. M I) . F 

M. F. Marine Barracks. New River. N. C. 
McInturff, Geo. F., '41 — Second Lieut., Quantico, Va. 
Robertson. Elliott B.. '39— Lieut.. A-2 Engr., F M. F.. M It N. Y , 

Pearl Harbor. T. H. 
Sachs, Carl August, '41 Second Lieut.. Quantico. \'a. 

UNITED STATES COAST GUARD 

Cairnes. George Wilson, '03 — Captain (F'l. 1722 Keith Bldg., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

• • • 

THE PRESENT CONFLICT 

(Continued from Page 3) disregard for treaties and 

international decency and the complete reliance upon brute force 
have become normal aspects of totalitarianism. So the United 
States found the foundations of its security being undermined and 
faced the prospect of being challenged, as it has now been dial 
lenged by Japan, upon its own territory. Perhaps it is well for 
our future that the Japanese have united our people in the de- 
termination to see this horrible mess through to a victorious end 
ing both for us and the other freedom-loving people in the world 
And when the job is done America must realize that we have a 
stake in the future — a responsibility in the preservation -it 
peace. Europe has never yet been involved m a general war with 
out our being dragged in. Three times it has happened, in 1812, 
in 1"14, in 1940, and we should guarantee thai it will not 
happen again. Each time we thought we could stay out anil tried 
to do so but without success. If we are to profit from the past 
we will realize that isolation has been a national ideal, but it has 
never worked. And so wc are doing the job over again. This tune 
must be the last and, if the Congress heeds the words of the Prcs 
ident's war message and if our people will profit from the lessons 
of history, it will be the last. But to do this we must be willing 
to help preserve the peace in combination with others of like 
mind rather than to encourage the war mongers and then hive to 
fight them to restore the peace. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Baltimore and D. C. 
Provide Scrappers 

Baltimore and Washington boys will 
carry the burden for the Maryland boxing 
team, which was to open its season by en 
tcrtaining South Carolina in Ritchie Coli- 
seum at College Park January 10. 

Scrappers to get first call are about evenly 
divided between the two cities. 

Here is Coach Bobby Goldstein's ten- 
tative line-up for the inaugural with the 
boxer's old high school: 

120 pounds — John Cicala of Tech High 
of Washington. 

127 pounds — Judson Lincoln of St. John's 
High of Washington. 

135 pounds — Tom Jones of Roosevelt 
High of Washington or 
Matthew Beccio of Forest 
Park High of Baltimore. 

145 pounds — Hotsy Alperstein of City 
College of Baltimore. 

155 pounds — Pat Quinn of Towson Cath- 
olic High or Alex Bobenko 
of City College, Baltimore. 

165 pounds — Jack Gilmore of Tech High 
of Washington. Also foot- 
ball end and Southern Con- 
ference high jump cham- 
pion. 

175 pounds — Herb Gunther of Baltimore 
Poly, Southern Conference 
champion. 

Heavyweight — Len Rodman (195), of 

City College of Baltimore. 

Others very much in the running for 

starting berths are Dunbar McNemar, 125, 

of Annapolis High; Bill Mattingly, 145, of 

St. John's High of Washington, and Lloyd 

Page, 165, of Roosevelt High, Washington. 
There are others of promise and, all 

told, it is about the best Terp squad in a 

number of years. 



FRESHMAN BECOMES FLYER 

Tom Fleming, Terp freshman sprinter 
from Laurel, is said to have gone to Can- 
ada to train to become an R. A. F. fiver. 



BOXING SCHEDULE 



January 10 — South Carolina. 

January 17 — Coast Guard at New London. 

January 24 — Western Maryland. 

January 31 — Virginia. 

February 7 — Catholic U. at Washington. 

February 14 — Virginia Tech. 

February 21— North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

February 27 and 28 — Conference tourney. 



1942 Varsity Ring Squad 











Yrs. on 




Name 


Wt. 


Ht. 


Age 


Squad High School 


Home 


Dunbar McNemar 


120 


5-10 


20 


1 


Annapolis 


Millersville. Md. 


Lewis Carter 


120 


5-9 


20 


1 


Eastern 


Washington, D. C. 


John Cicala 


120 


5-5> 2 


19 


1 


Tech 


Washington, D. C. 


Alex Kelley 


120 


5-6 V 2 


18 


1 


Bel Air 


Bel Air. Md. 


Emanual Massing 


120 


5-4 


18 


1 


City College 


Baltimore, Md. 


Ray. Bradshaw 


120 


5-6 


20 


1 


Tech 


Washington. D. C. 


•Judson Lincoln 


127 


5-5 


21 


2 


St. John's 


Washington, D. C. 


Henry Benson 


127 


5-5 


21 


2 


Hyattsville 


Hyattsville, Md. 


Matthew Beccio 


135 


5-9' 2 


20 


1 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Buck Lanza 


135 


5-10 


22 


2 


Aguirre 


Puerto Rico 


Tom Jones 


135 


5-7 


19 


1 


Roosevelt 


Washington, D. C. 


Fred Graybeal 


135 


5-6 


19 


1 


Tome 


Port Deposit, Md. 


•I. Alperstein 


145 


5-6 


23 


3 


City College 


Baltimore, Md. 


Bill Mattingly 


145 


5-9 Vi 


20 


2 


St. JoluVs 


Washington. D. C. 


Bill Campbell 


145 


5-8 V 2 


18 


1 


Mt. Rainier 


Mt. Rainier, Md. 


Robert Osyer 


145 


5-10 


20 


1 


Tech (D. C) 


Brentwood, Md. 


•Pat Quinn 


155 


6 


20 


2 


Towson Catholic 


Towson, Md. 


Alekey Bogenko 


155 


5-11 


19 


1 


City College 


Baltimore. Md. 


Emile Sunier 


155 


5-10 


22 


1 


Central 


Washington, D. C. 


Jack Gilmore 


165 


6-1 


20 


1 


Tech 


Washington, D. C. 


Judah Klein 


155-165 


5-11 


18 


1 


Erasmus Hall 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Lloyd Page 


165 


5-8 


20 


1 


Roosevelt 


Washington, D. C. 


Eugene Baldi 


165 


6-2 


20 


1 


Central 


Washington, D. C. 


•Herb Gunther 


175 


5-11 


21 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


•Leonard Rodman 


Heavy-195 


6 


21 


2 


City College 


Baltimore. Md. 






• 1941 Letter Men. 



Varsity Basket Ball Squad 



Yrs. on 



Name 


Pos. 


Wt. 


Ht. 


Age 


Squad School 


Home 


•Irving Gordy 


F. 


160 


6-2 


20 


2 


Cambridge 


Linkwood. Md. 


•Leib McDonald 


F. 


165 


5-10 


20 


2 


Sparks 


Sparks, Md. 


•Bob Fetters 


G. 


178 


6-3 


20 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


* Letter Men. 








From 1940- 


41 Freshman Squad 




Tommy Mont 


F. 


180 


6 


19 




Allegany 


Cumberland, Md. 


John Brenner 


F. 


173 


5-11 


21 




Hollidaysburg 


Hollidaysburg, Pa. 


Robert Knepley 


F. 


162 


5-9 


23 




Altoona 


Altoona, Pa. 


Eddie Baitz 


F. 


165 


6-2 


18 




Central 


Washington, D. C. 


Ernie Travis 


C. 


195 


6-3 


19 




Roosevelt 


Silver Spring, Md. 


Carlton Steiner 


c. 


180 


6-4 


20 




Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Robert James 


F. 


182 


6-1 


20 




John Harris 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Heckert Horn 


G. 


220 


6-3 


18 




Val. Forge MA. 


Dallastown, Pa. 


Don. Schuerholz 


G. 


163 


5-10 


19 




Southern 


Baltimore. Md. 


Thomas Murphy 


G. 


145 


6-1 


17 




Laurel 


Laurel, Md. 


James Kinsman 


F. 


157 


5-9 


19 




Bethesda 


Bethesda, Md. 



Doubleheader Is Slated 
To Open Winter List 

Maryland's varsity boxers and the fresh 
man basketers will team up for a double 
bill January 10 for the first winter sports 
event in Ritchie Coliseum. 

The young Terp tossers will play West- 
cm High before the scrappers battle South 
Carolina, a Southern Conference rival. 



FUTURE BASKET TILTS 

January 16 — Washington College. 
January 21 — Georgetown at Washington. 
January 24 — George Washington. 
January 31 — Virginia. 
February 2 — V. M. I. at Lexington. 
February 3 — Washington and Lee at 

Lexington. 
February 7 — Washington and Lee. 
February 11 — Navy at Annapolis. 
February 13 — William and Mary. 
February 14 — West Virginia. 
February 18 — Army at West Point. 
February 20 — North Carolina. 
February 23 — Duke. 
February 27— V. M. I. 
March 5. 6. and 7 — Southern Conference 

Tourney at Raleigh. 



DECEMBER 



194] 



Terp Quint Is Tuned 
By Tests On Road 



Maryland's sophomoric basket ball team, 
which finished a three game New York 
trip January 2 for its sixth game on the 
road this season, had little rest and tuning 
before taking another jaunt. 

The tossers resumed studies January 5 
and played at Virginia January 8 and Duke 
the next night. 

Then they had a week to prime for their 
first home game against Washington Col 
lege, January 1(>. 

Maryland lost all its three games in 
Gotham to powerful foes — Seton Hall of 
South Orange, N. J.. City College of New 
York and St. John's University of Brook- 
lyn. This was expected as the trip was ar- 
ranged to give experience to a green squad. 

Prior to the New York jaunt, the Terps 
had won one of three games, beating 
Richmond U., but bowing to William and 
Man' and West Virginia. 

When the Tcrps start their home stand 
on January lf>. the tossers should be set to 
play a brand of basket ball that should 
bring them an even break to the finish. 

'I 'he games with Richmond and William 
and Mary gave a 50-50 rating in Southern 
Conference games but the battle January 
9 with Duke may toss the balance the 
wrong way. Duke, Conference champ, ap- 
pears likely to keep its title. 

Ernie Travis, soph center, has set a sen 
sational pace, scoring 94 points in 6 games. 



"SHIP" ON JOB 18 YEARS 

Burton Shipley, Maryland '14, has been 
coaching the Terp tossers since the 1923-24 
campaign, this season marking his 18th 
at the helm. He has won 60 percent of his 
games against consistently tough opposi- 
tion. 

• 

DOESN'T RUN AS FIGHTER 

There is no significance to the fact that 
Judson Lincoln, Maryland's 127-pound 
boxer, got in trim for the ring sport by 
running on the cross country team, lie 
likes to trade toe to toe punches. Inci- 
dentally, he scored well as a harrier. 



FROSH BASKETBALL 

January 7— Tech High, 7 DO 

January 10 Western Hie,h. H 0(1 
January 1-1 Ordinance School I 00 
January 10 I la, Chevy Chase, 7 00 

January 21 Georgetown Froth at Washing- 
ton, 7:00. 
January T.i George Washington Froth, 7 (ill 

January 31 Baltimore Poly, 3:30. 

February 3 — Georgetown Fnr.li. 1:00. 
February 6 Central lli«h. 7:00. 
February 7— Forest Park. 3 30 
February 11 — Woodrow Wilson High, I mi 

February IX Army War College. , mm 
February 21 — Navy Plebes at AnnapolJ 



Terp Harriers Compile 
Gratifying Record 

Maryland's cross country team did well 

with only a fair squad during the past sea 
son, winning two of four dual meets and 
running third in the Southern Conference 
title race. 

Coached by Tommy Fields, former 
Maryland middle distance star and 1940 
Conference harrier champ, the hill ami 
dalcrs lost to North Carolina, winner of 
the title meet, and Virginia in dual af- 
fairs and scored over Duke and George- 
town. 

('.cue Ochsenreitcr, who finished sixth, 
was the first Terp to get home m the 
Conference meet that was staged at Col- 
lege l'ark, Wendell Lockwood of Duke 
taking the individual crown. Duke also 
was runner-up to North Carolina for the 
team honors. 

• 

Trackmen Are Toiling 
For Indoor Campaign 

Paul Pfeiffer, Maryland '37, and acting 
Terp track coach, has called his talent to 
start working for the indoor season. 

He is being aided by Capt. Eddie Quinn, 
another former Terp. who is attached to 
the R. O. T. C. staff. 

So far only three meets have been en 
tered, the Millrose in New York on Feh 
ruary 7, the Southern Conference games 
at Chapel Hill two weeks later, and the 
Catholic U. affair in Washington on 
March 14. 

Pfciffer's hopes for a strong relay team 
have been hard hit as Gene Ochsenreitcr. 
lus best runner, has applied for admission 
to the Army Air Corps and already has 
taken his physical examination. 



1942 Grid Schedule 
Is Well Balanced 
Although then 

the football H.mis that will 

season, then haw 

in the 1942 dates that mil t Hi. 

balm 

Florida, ha instant i . whii h wa . on the 

i ii I SI Indole on < )■ tobl I DO 

down foi tin last S ii thai mouth 

I Ii it puts I lainpdcu Sydm j on < j tober 3 
and gives the Terps two warm-up battles 
before swinging into tin tougher strugj 
I [ere is the revised list: 

Sept. 26 — Connecticut. 
Oct. .'1 — Hampden-Sydney. 
Oct. 10— Rutgers. 
Oct. 17— V. M. I. at Lexlnj 

Oct. 24 — Western Maryland al Baltimore 

Stadium. 
Oct. 31— Florida. 
Nov. 7 — Duke at Durham. 
Nov. 14 — Virginia al Charlottesville. 

Nov. 19 — Washinuton and Lee at Baltll 
Stadium. 



Nine Tilts, Title Meet 
Listed For Grapplers 

Maryland's wrestling team with Io< M 
Daniel, new coach, at the helm has hstcd 
nine matches ami also will take put m the 
Southern Conference tourney. 

McDaniel, national collegiate 118-pound 
champ while at Oklahoma A. and M. ami 
present V V U. titlcholder. has a fairly 
capable squad, led by Paul McNeil, ( 
ference 175-pound titlcholder and nude 
fcated in all his 41 bouts. 

Maryland's schedule: 

January In. Hopkins; 17, Gallaudet; 21. 
Davidson at Davidson. 

February 2. Virginia lech at Blacksburg; 
7, Haverford; 14. Duke at Durham; Is. 
Gettysburg at Gettysburg; 21. Muhlen 
berg; 2S. Rutgers at New Brunswick. 

March 5, 6, and 7, Conference toumey. 



G1LMORF. IS AMBITIOUS 

fack Gilmore, Maryland's Southern 
ference high jump champion, is after his 
third varsit] Icttei is a 165-pound boxci 

lie now holds "M's" in ti.uk and tootball 



torn Q, 






With MAUREEN O'HARA 

it's Chesterfield for Christmas 

She is appearing in the 

20th Century-Fox Production 

"HOW GPECN WAS MY VAUEY" 




FOR CHRISTMAS 



Jt/'C^dtf/t 



Here are your Milder Better -Tasting 

Chesterfields again ... in the most attractive, up-to-the- 
minute Christmas gift package of the year. 

Buy them for the folks at home . . . send them to your friends 
and don't forget to mail them to the hoys in the Service. 

YOU CAN'T BUY A BETTER CIGARETTE /Aetf OOUSfitf 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



Dr . Henry B. LI, 
College Park, 




JANUARY, 1942 



LI i- 

r l :- 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JANUARY, 1942 



Number 8 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 

OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomokc City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin- C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

{Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Longridge, '29 Education 

). M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28. . . . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George VV. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air. Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary, Frederick. Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor VVenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 
James W. Stevens, '19 President Dr. Ernest N. Cory, '09 



Myron B. Stevens, '27 Vice-President 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Edwin E. Powell, '13 Historian 



SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 



W. M. Kisiipaugh, '17 Football 

Eddie Semler, '23 Baseball 

Tilghman B. Marden, '25 Lacrosse 

H, B. Shipley, '14 Basket Ball 

Seymour W. Kuff, '17 Track 

Egbert Tingley, '27 Tennis 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 Cross Country 



Frank Hawkins. '34 Boxing 

Dr. Buckey Clemson, D.D.S., '21 

James M. Swartz, '19 

Jerre H. Sullivan, '21 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, M.D.. '04 

Lee Pennington '15 

G. F. Pollock, '23 



COVER PICTURE 

A panorama of the new campus, 
looking west from the New Admin- 
istration Building. On the left is 
the Home Economic, Agriculture, 
and Art and Science Buildings, with 
the New Girls' Dormitory in the far 
distance. On the right we have the 
Poultry, Horticulture, Engineering 
Buildings and Margaret Brent Hall 
Dorm for Girls. Since this was taken 
more work has been completed on 
the new quadrangle. 



At Large 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

A couple of months ago I wrote 
some "sassy" remarks to you fellows 
concerning football. I did so in the 
hope some of you would come back 
at me either in the News or person- 
ally with some worthwhile sugges- 
tions and had a plan of my own to 
propose. However, I'm having noth- 
ing more to say about that now, with 
the present disturbed conditions in 
education from primary schools 
to the University, it is hard to tell 
what place athletics will have, if 
any, outside of intramural activities. 
A four-year curriculum cut to three 
years will leave little time for inter- 
ruption of a schedule for extended 
play. 

I do not mean that I feel ath- 
letics will be cut off but certainly 
no accentuation of an athletic pro- 
gram can be inaugurated or even 
continued during the emergency. 

Let us take what we may have for 
the period and be thankful for 
(Continued on page 5) 



fytuo&iAihf, Schedule 

For some time the University has been adjusting some 

of its departments in order to meet the demands of 
the Federal Government in national defense measures. 
Especially the College of Engineering under Dean S. 
S. Steinberg has been giving extra courses in certain 
phases of engineering in an endeavor to supply the tre- 
mendous demand. Every night courses have been given 
since last year in this field. The industrial vocational 
department of the College of Education has also been 
giving extra courses to supply more teachers as well as 
skilled workers for the manufacturing plants in Mary- 
land. In addition to all this the University is going still 
further in stepping up its program for an all-out effort 
for present emcrgencv. 

In order that students now in school might finish 
their college education before going into active service 
the Univcrsitv will, this summer and next summer, give 
an extra semester's work. That is, all subjects that would 
have been given next fall will be given this summer 
and next fall will be like the second semester of next 
year. This procedure will enable those who would or- 
dinarily finish in June, 1943, to finish in Fcbruarv, 194-5. 
A student will have an opportunitv to complete his col- 
lege education in approximately three years. All faculty 
will go on a twelve-month-a-year basis. 

Manv other Federal Government departments are 
coming to the University to install additional courses 
or to procure space and facilities for Government De- 
partments to put in courses they desire bv furnishing 
their own instructors. The R. O. T. C. will, in the next 
semester, increase and intensify the military training. 

Every department in the University has been asked 
to arrange their schedules in order to efficientlv meet 
the extra demands for a total assistance to the Govern- 
ment in this national emergency. 



Dental Association — Dr. Charles S. Bcamer, D.D.S. '52, now 
practicing in Cumberland, was recently elected president of the 
Western Maryland Dental Association, 
ooo 

Aviation — Dr. J. E. Younger, chairman of the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering, gave an illustrated lecture on the De- 
velopment of American Aviation before the Oakland Intercity 
Rotary Club meeting. Dr. Younger is quite an authority on avia- 
tion research and has made some helpful recommendations for 
the future development of aviation. 

Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, of Oakland, president of the Carrctt 
County Alumni Group was responsible for the program at the 
Rotary meeting. 



Newell — Mrs. Esther Williams Newell, '24. attended the Tub 
lie Discussion Methods held in Washington in December, under 
the auspices of the A. A. U. W. Married Sterling R. Newell, '22 



ALUMNI PRESIDENTS, BOARDS 
MEET DR. BYRD, GUEST OF HONOR 

With two customs, both now ti.idition.il. m iiiuid. 

the presidents ot the various Alumni Associations called 
a combined meeting oi then Boards on January 20th in 
Baltimore. The fust reason was to keep alive the com 

hincd efforts ot the Alumni Associations whose cndc.iv 
ors are to work with concerted unit) toi .i greater I'm 
versity ot Maryland. The second was to keep the se- 
quence of annually observing the University ot N 
land Charter Day Celebration. Dr. II. C. Byrd, '08, prcs 
ident of the University, was the guest of honor and only 
speaker of the evening. Charles \V. Sylvester, ' ( iS. Gen- 
eral Chairman of the 1942 Charter Day Celebration, 
presided over the meeting. Fifty Alumni leaders as 
sembled for the occasion, exhibiting their genuine en- 
thusiasm and loyalty for the advancement and continued 
good services of their Alma Mater for the State and 
Nation in these days of emcrgencv. 

The annual Charter Day Celebration was omitted 
this year because of the National Emergency which has 
called on a large number of Alumni, faculty and friends 
of the University to certain duties with the civilian de- 
fense leaders. The University was also called upon to 
make arrangements to accelerate its schedule of educa- 
tion for the benefit of those boys who will be called for 
active duty. Another reason was the thought of econ- 
omy when so much is needed in adequately preparing 
the Nation for the tremendous financial burden of a 
war. 

Dr. Byrd spoke on the general plans of the University 
endeavoring to meet the situation. lie also touched on 
the athletic program and naturally football was in the 
limelight. Because of the emergency the program for 
next year will have some curtailment but the football 
schedule, in all probability, will have no change for 1942. 
The coaching situation is, however, a problem when the 
University has to consider the fact that the draft age 
limit might be lowered to 18 years of age. The age of 
20 will have a big effect on the squad but IS would 
practically wipe it out. Therefore, economy is a real 
consideration when reorganizing the general athletic 
set-up. The Alumni are definitely needed in any reor- 
ganization the University will undertake. A more closely 
united Alumni organization in the State is to be per- 
fected whereby the twelve thousand Alumni can be 
called upon for concerted efforts in behalf of the Uni- 
versity's program. 

Those present were Dr. Walter D. Wise, president of 
Medicine; Dr. Leonard I. Davis, president of Dental: 
Mr. John E. Magers, president of Law; Dr. A. A. Parker, 
president of College Park (Continued on pj^c 4) 



FROM THE FAR EAST 

It is reported that Allan Miller, '40, former Terp 
star trackster and a Lieutenant in the U. S. Marine Corps 
was at Wake Island and now is a prisoner of war. Lieut. 
Mason Chronister, '40, U. S. Marines, a running mate 
of Miller's, was in Shanghai, China, and it now is be- 
lieved he is in the Philippines. Jim Kchoc, the other 
member of that star trio of tracksters, is with the Army 
at Camp Meade. Md. 

Preston L. Peach, '03, principal of a high school in 
Kuala Lumpur, has been heard from he is in Singapore 
at the present time, as reported by S. M. Peach. Mrs. 
Anita Peters Burleigh. '29, went to Honolulu last fall 
to meet her husband, William Burleigh, '29, and it 
is possible they were there during the raid in Decem- 
ber. Also Jean Dulin, '38, now Mrs. Grant Heston, was 
in Honolulu during the raid. 



Dr. Byrd, Guest of Honor 

(Continued from page 3) Schools; Dr. O. W. Muehl- 
hause, president of Pharmacy; Miss Margaret Wilson, 
representing Nursing; W. Buckey Clemson, D.D.S., 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Dan J. Pessagno, M.D., Edgar Frie- 
denwald, M.D., Charles Bagley, M.D., Francis Sauer, 
D.D.S., F. Black, Ph.D., W. A. Purdum, Ph,G„ How- 
ard Wilcox, LL.B., Maxwell Suls, LL.B., Harrv Harri- 
son, Ph.C, Daniel Shehan, D.D.S., Adam Bock, D.D.S.. 
Howard Van Natta. D.D.S., G. J. Phillips, D.D.S., 
Hamilton Whiteford, A. & S., R. M. Watkins, A. & S., 
Austin C. Diggs, A. & S., Mrs. Edith Burnside White- 
ford, A. & S., J. A. Bromley, Engr., K. E. Smith, Agr., 
Miss Martha Ross Temple, H.E., Omar Crothers, A. & 
S., Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, H.E., P. W. Chichester, 
Agr., Mrs. Carolyn Chesser Coppinger, H.E., Mrs. Beth 
McCall Roberts, H.E., T. B. Marden, Comm., Arthur 
Muhlback, Ph.C, Frank D. Day, Ed., Frank Dryden, 
Engr., J. Hanson Mitchell, Engr., Dr. T. B. Symons, 
Agr., Dr. McKenzie Stevens, Comm., Dean Harold Ben- 
jamin, Education, Dean S. S. Steinberg, Engineering, 
Dean Marie Mount, H.E., Dean Adele Stamp of 
Women, and Dean J. Ben Robinson, Dental, Dean 
Roger Howell, Law, Acting Dean Boyd Wylie, 

Medicine. 

• • • 

Married — Victoria Augusta Bundick, '31, and member of 
Kappa Delta, married Warren Ferguson Hoflcr, November 28, in 
Elkton, Maryland. 



Married — Don Hammerlund, '32, and Miss Ida Eveler of 
Washington, were married October last in Washington. Don is 
a member of Thcta Chi, and has received his law degree from 
Georgetown U. 




Two graduates and three other former Old Liners 
are now Aviation Cadets in the Southeast Air Corps Re- 
placement Center, which has its headquarters at Max- 
well Field in Montgomery, Ala. 

They are Sylvan Phillip Einbinder of Baltimore, Class 
of 1937; Leonard Carter Cranford of Washington, D. 
C, Class of 1941; Marron Clark Hudson of Delmar, 
Del.; Robert Clyde Porter of Washington, D. C, and 
George Edward Martin of Baltimore. 

The men entered the Replacement Center here carlv 
in November to undergo military processing before be- 
ing sent out to one of the Training Center's primarv 
flight schools for their first training in the air. 

Upon the completion of the rigid 30-week course, 
they will be awarded commissions as second lieutenants 
in the Air Corps and will be assigned to tactical or train- 
ing units as flying officers. One of them, Cranford, 
owned a private pilot's license earned under the C. A. A. 
program. 

Cranford was a member of the Universitv Band, the 
Flying Club and the junior chapter of the American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers. He was a civil engineer at the 
Washington National Airport before entering the Army. 

Einbinder, a pharmacist, is a member of Phi Alpha 
fraternity. Hudson is a Delta Sigma Phi, while Porter, 
a Kappa Alpha, was chairman of the 1941 Homecoming. 
Martin belongs to Theta Chi. 



Alumni Meet at Rutgers 

Despite the rain, and it was sufficient to make it a 
very damp day, it did not stop the loyalists from getting 
together. Following the Rutgers game in New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., an Alumni gathering was held at the 
Roger Smith Hotel, sponsored by the New York group. 

Among those present were Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Kinnamon, '30 (nee Miss Christine Sim- 
monds, '31), Mrs. Howard Moreau (nee Miss Dale Sim- 
monds, '24), Miss Helen Simmonds, '27, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hamilton Howard, '26, Mr. and Mrs. Denzel Davis, '35 
(nee Miss Nancy Brice, '35), Mrs. Charles V. Hale 
(Miss Grace Coe, '25), Jim Forrester, '39, George Fogg, 
'26, Major Geary Eppley, '18, and G. F. Pollock, '23. 

The gathering was arranged and directed by Fred Ra- 
kerman, '18, and Don Keiffer, '31, officers of the New 
York group. It was a nice social get-together and every 
one seemed to enjoy the "Terrapin" talk. There should 
be more of this. 



Ensign Booth, '36, Killed 
At Pearl Harbor 

The first District of Columbia boy to be killed in the 
Pear] Harbor attack was Ensign Robert Sinclair Booth, 
Jr., a member of the Class of 1936. After leaving Man 
land lie worked for the Western Electric Co.. in New 
Jersey. A year later he joined the U.S. Reserve Midship 
men School. Booth was a sea-going enthusiast, having 
worked his way to Germany and India during summer 
vacations. 

When notified of his death, his mother's replj was: 
"He died the way we know he would have wanted to 
die — in the service of his country and in the Navy." 

Robert Sinclair Booth. '36, Ensign, U. S. \.i\\, the 
first ex-Marylander to make the supreme sacrifice in the 
service of our country. 



ALLEGANY COUNTY GROUP 
TO REORGANIZE 

When the basket ball team journeyed to Cumberland 

for a game with the University of West Virginia in the 
Fort 1 1 ill High School Gym December 19th, main 
Alumni in the Western Maryland counties attended the 



game. Prior to the game the Allegany County Alumni 
Reorganization Committee held a meeting at the Y. 
M. C. A. President E. Brooke Whiting appointed Fred 
Hetzcl, '30, acting secretary in the absence of Major 
Joe Franklin. Dr. Albert C. Cook, '33, D.D.S., presided 
as chairman of the committee. 

Plans for reorganization of the county group was 
quickly discussed and those present pledged their ef- 
forts toward a general county meeting later in the win- 
ter for effecting a more active and permanent organiza- 
tion. The committee then went to the basket ball game. 
Fred Iletzel, a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
was active in making plans and arrangements for the 
game. 

Among those present for the committee meeting 
were Miss Rose Alice Laughlin, A.&S. '30,Miss Helen 
McFerran, H.E. '34, A. G. Wallis, Engr. 73, K. P. 
Heintz, D.D.S. '05, Miss Margaret Loar, H.E. '41, Miss 
Man- E. Murray, Ed. '30, Chas. Beamer, D.D.S. '32. 
Samuel M. Jacobson, M.D. '31, Samuel McFarlane, 
A.&S. '39, Forrest Brown, LL.B. '75, Dan R. Stalev. 
A.B. 75, Miss Ruth E. Somerville, A.&S. '37, William 
R. Carscaden, LL.B. '37, Harold E. Naughton. LL.B. 
'36/34, Miss Janet Anderson, A.B. '37, Harry Bcggs, 

B.S. 78, John E. McDonald, A.&S. '30. 

• • • 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. C. Lyle Bock have a son. Peter, born 
August 22, 1941. Mrs. Bock was formerly Miss Eleanor Nordeen, 
"37. 



FELLOW ALUMNI Continued from pag< 

thai much, hut .it tin.' same tunc tiv to formulate souk 
scheme, workable scheme, of interest and applicable 

to all. so when the emergency is OVC1 we (.in place our 

Maryland teams when- each and .ill ol us want them 

to he. 

[nsofai as possible, I am sine nothing will he cm tailed 
ill any of the work oi the I fniversity, < it he i On the 1 1 ill 
or iii Baltimore. However, with times as the) at 
present, we ma) expect a lot ol things to ch 
never thought would be disturbed. It such cha 
necessary, it behooves us to accept them with cquanim 
ii\ and give them our loyal support. 

Anothei year is well on its wax M\d has brought 
mendously perilous times for us and oui Nation, as well. 
So great is the emergencj that I feai we have not, as a 
whole, realized the seriousness of the situation m its en 
tircty. Sooner or later it will touch all ol US, not alone in 
the form of contributions, taxes and business affairs, but 
it is going to enter even our homes and personal 
lives as well, before we can again enjoy the period of 
uninterrupted work of our own choosing and take our 
pleasure and recreation at will, as of yore, 

1 have no fear but that every Maryland man and 
woman will be found ready and willing to perform then 
allotted service in whatever station called, whether to 
their liking or not just as Maryland's citizenry have done 
in the past — even to the point of the "Supreme Sacri 
ficc" as some of our Alumni already have done. Those 
who arc associated with the training and teaching of 
the students at the University of Mankind may well 
feel proud of the long list of Maryland men who already 
arc occupying places of importance in the military set- 
up for the defense of our country with the Army, \av\ 
and Marines. 

Those proud principles of patriotism and unselfish 
seryice for others, first learned at our mothers' knee have 
been enlarged upon and so deeply impressed upon the 
boys and girls at Maryland as to make them stand-outs 
in emergencies. 

All this goes not only for those in the military service 
but in the civilian defense and business world as well. 
Everywhere we look we find the names of Maryland 
men working and doing their work well in the way they 
should and in the way that makes us proud to call them 
fellow Alumni. 

Let us all sec to it that nothing is left undone to earn 
through the work of the present emergency in every way 
to as early a successful conclusion as possible, that 
at the end we may enjoy the happy reflection of a job 
well done. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Gridmen And Harriers 
Dined, Given Letters 

Man land's varsity football players and 
harriers recently were feted at a dinner 
at the Raleigh Hotel in Washington at 
which time 21 gridmen and seven cross- 
country men received the "M". 

It strictly was a "family" party, with 
only President II. C. Byrd and others 
closely associated with athletics at the Uni- 
versity being present. Dr. R. G. Steinmeyer 
of the faculty served as an entertaining 
toastmaster and Charles R. Fenwick, one- 
time Virginia star and later coach of the 
line for his Alma Mater and for Maryland 
from 1928-1932, gave a pleasing address. 
Dr. Byrd also spoke briefly. 

Later the athletes were taken to a show 
and the informal affair was thoroughly en- 
joyed by the entire group. 

Gridders to get the "M" were: Dick 
Alexander, Luther Conrad and Bob James, 
ends; Reginald Vincent, Ralph Burlin and 
Jack Dittmar, tackles; Harold Berry, Eddie 
Chovanes, Frank Heyer and John Morton, 
guards; George Jarmoska and Jim Whar- 
ton, centers, and John Brenner, George 
Barnes, John Cordyack, Mearle DuVall, 
Jack Mier, Tom Mont, Elmer Rigby, Ber- 
nic Ulman, and Jack Wright, backs 

Burlin, Cordyack, DuVall, Heyer, Mor- 
ton, Ulman and Max Hunt, tackle, all of 
whom have completed their grid careers, 
received gold footballs for three years' 
service. Hunt was prevented by an injury 
from getting his letter the past season and 
Wharton was kept idle in 1940 by illness, 
so missed out on a gold award. 

Harriers to be rewarded were Bob Con- 
don, Stuart Cooley, Stirling Kehoe, Stan- 
ley Kihn, Judson Lincoln, Gene Ochsen- 
reiter, Roy Skipton and Wylie Hopkins, 
manager. 

TRAVIS MUCH IMPROVED 

Ernie Travis, Maryland sophomore who 

has scored 1 39 points in his first nine 

games for the varsity, registered only 126 

in 14 contests for the 1941 freshman quint. 



All-University Night 
Prosram Called Off 

All-University Night, slated for Febru- 
ary 14, which in recent years has been a 
feature of the winter program, has been 
called off this year on account of war con- 
ditions. Those who usually do the work 
on the big program are too busy with 
matters of a more serious nature. 

Of course, the double bill carded that 
night will be carried out. West Virginia 
will be met in basket ball and Virginia 
Tech in boxing. 



Good Gridders Modest 
Wright, Burlin Show 

Jack Wright, soph back, and Ralph 
Burlin, senior tackle, of the Terp football 
team are timid souls off the gridiron. Bur- 
lin was too bashful to attend the Wash- 
ington Touchdown Club banquet to re- 
ceive the award as Maryland's most val- 
uable 1941 gridder and Wright, who re- 
ceived the WJSV trophy as the leading 
player of 1941 in the District of Columbia 
area, wouldn't go until he was assured he 
wouldn't have to make a speech. 

Wright is from Baltimore; Burlin is a 
farm boy from Port Deposit, Md., who 
is studying engineering. 
• 

DuVALL MAY PLAY SOON 

Mearle DuVall, veteran basket ball ace 
who had a knee operation during the holi- 
days, may return to action shortly after 
February 1. He's practicing lightly now. 
He'd be a great asset. 

PORTS IS ALL-EASTERN 

Kenny Ports, Maryland soccer star who 
recently was picked as left halfback on the 
official collegiate All-Eastern team, is from 
Walkcrsvillc, Md. He's a junior in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, so has another year 
of competition. 



Basketers And Mittmen 
Having Rough Voyages 

Maryland's sophomoric basket ball team 
was just developing after winning three of 
its first 9 games and the Terp boxing squad 
had hardly lived up to expectations in being 
tied by South Carolina, 4-all, and losing to 
the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, 3-5, 
when this was written. 

The tossers, who took a 3-game trip to 
Gotham to get experience during the holi- 
days and dropped all contests — as was 
expected — to Seton Hall, City College 
of New York, and St. John's of Brooklyn, 
has been improving but still is far from a 
developed outfit. The Terps in their last 
three battles, that included a victory over 
Washington College on January 16, had 
taken two out of their last three tilts, beat- 
ing Virginia 35-34, and losing to Duke, 
33-37, on a trip just previous to trimming 
the Shoremen, 28-25. 

However, Maryland will have to gener- 
ate more scoring strength to do as well as 
break even in its remaining games and 
faces a terrific uphill fight to qualify for 
the Southern Conference tourney. It must 
be in the first eight of the 16-team leop 
to make the grade and its standing in the 
first three circuit tilts was 1-2. 

The boxing team, with the exception of 
Hotsy Alpcrstcin, is all juniors and sophs, 
and should get better as the season ad- 
vances. It has been doing all right in the 
lighter weights but has been failing in the 
classes starting with the 155-pound divi- 
sion. Herb Gunther, light-heavy champ of 
the Conference, lost the second bout of his 
career in the Coast Guard engagement, 
being shaded, according to the referee, by 
a single point. 

Tough going was ahead when this was 
written — with Western Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, Catholic U., Virginia Tech and 
North Carolina remaining on the sched- 
ule. All the matches were at home, except 
the final with the Tar Heels. 

Maryland also will compete in the Con- 
ference tournev. 



[ANUARY, 1942 

Football Next Season 
Is Uncertain Quantity 

Football at Maryland, as well as all othei 
institutions, is an uncertain quantify foi 
the 1942 season and maybe one 01 two 
to follow. This situation has served to put 
the quietus on talk of changes in the Terp 
coaching staff and speculation centers 
upon what kind of a team can be put on 
the field next fall. 

Uiulei ordinary circumstances there 
would be 22 players left from last hall's 
Maryland varsity squad, 10 of whom would 
be seniors and 12 of whom would he jun 
iois. However, all of them will eome within 
the 2d year minimum draft aye. In fact, 
all that would be left for a squad, leaving 
out those who will he 20 next Fall, would 
be IS from last season's freshman outfit, 
ID of whom will be 19 ami five of whom 
will be only 18 when the next grid cam- 
paign arrives. Thirteen other 1941 year- 
lings also then will be within the draft 
range. 

Small Squad In Prospect 

Excluding a number who doubtless will 
fail to pass the physical test and some ex- 
emptions for various reasons. Maryland 
probably could get together a squad of 
25 or a few more without the use of fresh- 
men, which is being advocated by main 
schools for the duration of the war. 

Some consideration likely will be given 
Maryland on account of its highly-rated 
Reserve Officers Training Corps Unit ami 
its Engineering College. Botli give very 
valuable men to the service. But football, 
at best, strictly will be a secondary matter 
everywhere next Fall, it again taking war to 
place it where it really belongs at many 
institutions. 

Back in 191 S — it was Maryland State- 
then — the football squad at College Park 
functioned as a representative of the Stu- 
dent Army Training Corps and played six 
games, five of which it won. That season, 
though, was not counted against the future 
eligibility of the gridmen as sonic of them 
were from other institutions. Something 
like this may be expected again. 

Mankind, with athletes always conspic- 
uous among the leaders in the R. O. T. 



i t [ int . has l;i\ en man) offi< ci s direct 
to the service and qualified a wealth oi 
others foi tin- reserves It is noteworthy 
that five stalwarts of Maryland's great TJ2s 
eleven an majors m tin U s Marine 

Corps. The) aic Joe Burger, John I lough, 

facie McQuade, Ed Pugh and Ralph 

I aiiigan. 

Right now there hardl) is a Marine oi 
\i ii i\ post thai does not contain a Mar) 

land iii.m as an officer, and the iIi.uk is 
are. too. that he was an athlete. 

This ve.u's Maryland R. O. T. C. Unil 
is commanded b) athletes. Jimmy Dunn, 
football halfback and wrestler, is the col 
onel; the ranking officers and three of the 
four lieutenant colonels also are sports 
stars. They are Jim \\ harton, letterman in 
football, baseball and basket ball; Paul 
McNeill, gridder and Southern Confer 
ence 175 pound wrestling champion, and 
Bob Smith, great football center and base 
ball pitcher. 

o 

Soccer Players, Frosh 
Athletes Rewarded 

Eighteen members of Maryland's unde- 
feated soccer team, which won eight games 
and tied Navy and Temple, recently were 
awarded minor letters. 

At the same time numerals went to 21 
freshmen gridders and four yearling cross- 
countrv runners. 

Rewarded soccer players were: Julian 
Anderson, Erank Bent/, Dick Cleveland, 
Hartley Crist, Chester Ernst, Bob Fetters, 
Merrcll Grafton, Clark Hudack, Bob Main. 
Bob Maisel, Leib McDonald. Russell Mi 
zell, Kenneth Ports, Doty Remsburg. Doyle 
Royal, Louis Tiemey, Reeves Tillcy and 
Roscoe Whipp. 

Frosh gridders honored were: Marshall 
Brandt, Carlton Compiler, Jr., Charley 
Dove, Oscar DuBois, Arthur Ferris, Doug- 
las Fields, Bob Filippelli, Paul Flick, Ralph 
Iliggins, Ocorgc Hill, Jack Hufman. Ed- 
ward Johnson, John Lookabaugh, Lloyd 
Mallonee, Dick Metzler, Walter Nechey, 
Bob Perilla, Howard Smedley, Jun Thom- 
as. Hubert Werner, and Jim \\ issmger. 

Yearling harriers were: Roland Nordeen, 
Henry Elliott, Albert Williams and Charley 
Rice. 



Trackmen Are Toiling 

For Indoor Campaign 

\ sizabU 1 1 ip trad iquad is toiling 
d.nlv in preparation foi ind I in 

New Voik and othei pi - 

Stress now is being laid upon < 

pective 2-mile team. Boh Condon. Km 
dall ( annul and Stirlin Kehoi provide 
three fleel men and a topnotch four would 

have been certain had not ( ,iiu ( ). h 

reiter, ace of the squad, gone into the 
\iinv \u Corps. Ochsenreitei won the 
Conference ss< i crown last spring and 
second in the 44o 

Stanlcv Kihn, led St ell. Bill Stellliom 
and Bob Montgomery are contenders for 

the fourth spot. These seven also will do 
most of the Tcrps' running from the 440 

through the two miles. 

Including Ochsenreitei. Maryland has 
given four outstanding trackstcis to the 
service: Tom Devlin, leading quarter 
miler; Willis Smith, hurdler, and Bob 
Porter, high juniper. Vernon Miller, an 
other star 440 man, is ready to take the 
step and has not reported for training. 

Among others working out are Duke 
Alexander, clever soph high jumper and 
hurdler, and I toward Cugel and Pat Cam 
Ian, sprinters. Carolan is a New Yorker 
who came to Maryland last fall from Per 
kinson Junior College of Mississippi. 

Heckert Horn, sensational sophomore 
shot and discus hurler, will not be available 
for the indoor season. He's an important 
cog m the varsity basketball team. Horn 
threw the discus 164 feet in practice last 
summer. 

Jack Cihnore. Southern Conference out- 
door high jump champ, is on the boxing 
squad. 



COLONEL ON MAT SQUAD 

Col. Jiniinv Dunn wrestles in the 165 
pound class for the Man land mat team. 
Ik's the ranking officer of the highly- 
rated R. (). T. C. Unit. Dunn is a Wash 
ington, D. C . bo) who prepped al Staun 
ton Militar) Academy. He's also vice-presi 
dent of the Senior Class. 




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to top-notch manufacturing methods. 



make Chesterfield your Smoking Pleasure of the year 





FEBRUARY, 1942 



i — i T3 

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c. ^ 

CD 

>> rH 

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ALUMNI 
NEWS 






Q 




H, 





ETERAN 



E IS independent and proud, yet democratic 
and friendlv. He is the envy of the rest of the world, 
and its hope. He is generous and tolerant and peace- 
loving and withal the most powerful man in the 
world. He is the American workman. 

His hands, accustomed to the feel of wrench and 
lever and gauge, mav never have held a gun; his 
mind, trained to think in terms of tolerances as fine 
as 1/10,000 of an inch, may never have wrestled with 
a problem of military strategv; and yet he is the 
veteran of a thousand campaigns. 

His campaigns began in the laboratories, and his 
prowess was proved in the test pits of American 
industry. His battles were waged on the factorv 
floor and in the field. His victories have helped to 
make the citizens of the United States the most 



fortunate people in the world, and the U. S. the 
greatest nation on earth. 

In the plants of the General Electric Company, 
working with General Electric scientists and engi- 
neers, this man, the American workman, has made 
giant generators to light whole cities, X-ray tubes 
to penetrate the mvsteries of human flesh and moral 
castings, radio and television apparatus to project 
man's voice and image through space over the 
mysterious waves of the ether. 

Todav, in the gravest hour of world history, he is 
engaged in the greatest campaign of all. But there is 
serenity and confidence in his face, and the experience 
of a thousand campaigns behind him. He is sure of 
his own abilities, certain of his country's future. 
General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 



GENERAL » ELECTRIC 



oiiunc 



XIII 



Maryland alumni news, llbrl\ry. lh: 



\ 



1 1 1 1 1 j- 



Alumni Association University of Maryland 

Founded in 1S92 

OFFICERS FOR 1941 -42 

I)k. A. A. Parker, "05, President 

Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '2i, First Vice-President Calverl Hills, Md 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Mil. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College I'.irk, Md 

ALUMNI HOARD 

(Note — The officers named above arc also members ol the Alumni Hoard) 

Charles V. Koo.ss, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 . Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Lonciudce, '29 Education 

f. M. Lescure, '23; K. E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26: Jerome Hardy, '39 , . . . Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, 'i2; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Az-umni News, issued monthly by the University nf Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Paric, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson. 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond. 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clcndaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36. 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; II. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary. 

Bel Air. Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40. 

Secretary. Frederick. Md. 

Baumgartner, '27, President: Mrs. [Catherine Stevenson Helbig. 



Mary Fisher. 



GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I 

'.!2. Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Diugman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, "25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. 1' 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON. D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Ilolzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.: I. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Ilearnc. '30, President; Miss Dettie Harcum, '38, Se< 

retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

James W. Stevens, '19 President Dr. Ernesi N, Coxy, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

Myron B. Stevens, '27 Vice-President Edwin K. Powell, '13 -Historian 



W. M. Kishpaugh, '17 

Eddie Semler, '23 

Tilchman B. Marden, '25.. 
H. B. Shipley. '14 

Seymour W. Riff. '17 

Egbert Tinc.i.ey, '27 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 



SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 

Football Frank Hawkins. '.<! Boxing 

Baseball Dr. Buckey Clem son, 1) DS, '21 

Lacrosse [ames M. Swartz, '19 

Basket Ball Jerri II Sullivan, '21 VI 
Track Dr. A. W. Valentine, M D 

Tennis Lee PENNINGTON '15 

Cross Conntrv G I" POLLOCK, '.'. ; 



COVER PICTURE 

\u etching From the p< n of < ). K 
Carrington, '28, ol the girls' N 
Dormitory, familiarlj known bj stu 
dents .is \nnc \miihK I 1 1 ill Tins 

picture was draw n for the 1941 1 
book. Terrapin. Vnne Arundel Hall 
faces east and is .it the wesl end ol 
the new campus quadrangle which 
in the vallej north of the Agricul 
tur.il Building, where old Riggs road 
used to run through the campus 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

Even though it's February, Spring 
is not far off and the Spring sports 
will be attracting our attention. I 
understand our Alma Mater will 
carry on the Spring schedule as plan- 
ned. While I am a large rural town 
doetor and kept rather busy with m\ 
normal practice plus war-time re 
quirements, I expect to be in College 
Park for several games and would 
like to see main more of nn fellow 
\lumni there. 

Just as soon as possible I will send 
a letter to each leader of the County 
Groups asking them to hold meet 
ings this Spring. In the meantime 
tins note will inform all Alumni 
thai the) are to take an active in- 
terest in the activities of the Count) 
Group. Some will ask. \\ hat can we 
do? First we need scholarships, next 
you can contacl prospective students 
and sell them the advantages ol 
vour University, then your fellow 
\luuuii and urge them to make 
plans foi attending the Grand Re 
union on M.n 29. The Fiftieth Anni 
versan of our Alumni Association. 

( onrilllied on page 5 I 



Mainland Men On AcUue, 2>nfy 



We arc listing below the names of University of Mary- 
land men who arc in the Service, as compiled from the 
returned Alumni questionnaires which were sent out 



during the last month. As other questionnaires are re- 
turned we expect to list in future issues the names and 
stations of other Maryland men who are on active duty. 



UNITED STATES ARMY 
Amman. Andrew Taylor, '41 Sergeant, A. W. S. T. C. 3rd Interceptor 

Command, Drew Field, Tampa. Florida. 
Ames, Henr-* Peck, '13 Major, on dutj with Cavalry. No post given. 
Baden hoop, Herman Ions, '4n First Lieut.. Kurt Geo. G. Meade, Ma 
Beneze, Geo. Charles, '40 Private. First Class. Compan> C. 703d Mil 

itarj Police, UN. Arlington Cantonment, Va. 
Brown, A. Freeborn, 3d. '41 Enlisted in Arm} in September. No post 

given. 
Cannon, Roberi E. P.. '39 Private. 29th Division Finance Office, A. 

P. (). J". Fori George G. Meade. Md. 
Chiswell, Lawrence Russell, '31— First Lieut.. A. P. O, J'). Fort tie... 

i, Meade, Maryland. 
Day, John K.. '.'K Captain. Staff and Faculty M. P School, Arlington 

mment, Virginia. 
Downs. Hugh ().. Jr.. '41 Second Lieut.. 72nd Engineer Company (LP). 

Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 

-.. FRANK Patrick. '36 First Lieut.. 9 Neal> Ave.. Langley Field. 

Virginia. 
Dwyer, Frank Arthur, Jr.. '41 Second Lieut.. Co. L. 47th Q. M. Ken t.. 

Fort Oeorge G. Meade. Maryland. 
FriedENWALD, AaRON, '29 Lieut.. Co. K. 175th Int.. A. 1". O. 29, Fort 

George G. Meade. Maryland. 
Harwoou, Daniel J.. '41 Second Lieut.. 181 Infantry, A. P. O. Jo. Camp 

Edwards, Massachusetts. 
HENDERSON, Ioseimi. '38 Corporal. Camp Crowder. Missouri. 
Higgins, Horace R., '33— First Lieut., War Dept. O. Q. M. G., Motor 

Transport Division, O. C. 
Hint. Walter E., '31 Second Lieut.. Q. M. C. C. A. S. I'. No. 1108, 

Fort Adams, Rhode Island 
IMUS, ALDEN Lion. Jr.. '41 Second Lieut.. Co. A. S4th Ellg. Bn. (Cam). 

Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 
Klotzman, Kohkrt Harold. '33 Lieut.. P. O. Box No. 2014, France 

Field, Canal Zone. 
LAWRENCE, GEORGE E., '40 Lieut.. 56th Infantry Bn.. Camp Walters, Tex. 
Lines, William Fuller, '.'J Lieut., Commanding Company, Fort Knox. 

Tennessee. 
Lundell, Ernst Drake, '37 Lieut., Ordnance Dept.. Washington, D. C. 
Maisel, Fred'k C. '41 Second Lieut., Co. K, 4th R. C. N. Bn., Fort 

Benning, Georgia. 
Marshall, Donald P., '41 Second Lieut., 1st Bn., stli Int., Camp Goi 

don. Georgia. 
Minion. Edward M., '36 Lieut.. 114th Infantry, Fort Dix, N. .1. 
Mooki. John Edwin, '38 Second Lieut.. 110th Inf. Service Co., Indian- 
town Gap, Pennsylvania. 
Over, Ik\ Earl, |r.. '36 Sergeant, Ellington Field. Texas. 
PfeiffeB, Pall Emil, ','w First Lieut.. Battery I). 8th Brigade, Fort 

Bragg. North Carolina. 
Reckord, John G., '41 Lieut., 8th Infantry, Camp Gordon, Georgia. 
Reid, Richard Savage Carlton. '41 Second Lieut.. Co. L, 4th Recon- 
naissance Bat., Fort Benning, Georgia. 
Schneider, William Randolph, '37 First Lieut.. Ord. Dept.. Co. A. 

Second Ordnance Training Battalion. Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. 
Schaffer, Richard William. '41 Private, 62nd Air Base, Lawson Field. 

Fort Benning, Georgia. 
Scotnicki. Frank. '39 Lieut.. Q. M.. Langley Field. Virginia. 
Shegogue, Edward R.. '.'7 Boiling Field. 

SMITH. CLAUDE IIarman. ',!_' First Lieut.. Infantry. No post given. 
SUIT, William Jack. '41 Second Lieut.. 22nd Infantry, Camp Cordon. 

Georgia. 
Tapper, Herman A.. '41 Second Lieut. No post given. 
Tai.kfs. Walter Noble, '.'5 First Lieut.. Q. M. ('.. Camp Lee. Virginia. 
Walker, Franklin Leroy, '.'5 Lieut.. Barnes Gen. Hospital. Vancouver, 

Washington. 
WaNNAN, CHARLES W., '41 Second Lieut.. 22nd Infantry. 4th Division, 

Camp Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. 
White, Richard O., '.'4 Second Lieut.. Camp Wheeler. Georgia. 
Wilhelm, Charles Philip, '21 — Major, Infantry, Headquarters Second 

Army. 76 Court Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee. 
Williams. Ralph Irwin. '33, '41 Captain, I', of Maryland Military Dept 
Wool w ni., Lawrence Archer, '39 Sergeant. Headquarters Co., O. R. 

T. ('.. Aberdeen Proving Ground. Maryland. 

ARMY AIR CORPS 

Ahalt, Louis Franklin, '40 Aviation Cadet, Lodwick Aviation Military 

Academy, Avon Park, Florida. 
Dayton, Brady J.. Jr.. '36 First Lieut., Ami) Post Office 801-C, New 

foundland. 

DlEFFENBAI K, AlP.Kkl WOODSON, '411 Aviation Cadet. No post given. 

Keener, Bernard Henry, '.>.' First Lieut.. Headquarters and Head- 
quarters Sc|dn., 48th Air Base Group, Losey Field, Ponce, Puerto Rico. 
Kreuzbrug, Harvey Wilson, Jr., '40 Lieut.. Armj Air Corps. No post 

OSWALD, HUYETTE BECK, 'll Second Lieut.. Headquarters Sqti.idl on . 

Tenth Air Depot Group, Patterson Field, Fairfield, Ohio. 
RODIER, John M.. '37 Lieut., 14th Recoil. Sqdn., MacDott Field, Tampa. 

Florida. 
Saltzman, Ernesi i ' iiokii. 'ii Aeronautical Engr., Wright Field, Model 

Test Unit, Dayton, Ohio. 
Schultz, Melvin James, Ml Lieut.. 7 1 >t Air Base Squadron, A. P, o 

soi ( '. \, « foundland, 

\k\ r. Fran i is Dodge, '37 First Lieut.. Rio Hato An Base, R. de P. 
Thomas, Roberi Walker, '36 First Lieut.. Albrook Field, Panama 

Canal /one. 



MARINE CORPS 

Knnis. Louis A.. '36 Captain, 2 H. & S.. 11. F. M. D., F. M. F., Marine 

Barracks, New River. South Carolina. 
GlFFORD, William Renton, '31 First Lieut.. Reserve, I'. S. Marine 

Corps Headquarters. 
Miller, Alan Randolph, '40- Lieut.. U. S. S. Enterprise, Pacific Ocean. 
Miller, Harvey Louis Lieut. Col.. 1st Marine Division. F. M. F.. 

New River. North Carolina. 
MUELLER, John Leo, '41 —Company "C", Candidates Class, Quantico. Va. 
Williams, Donald IL. '.is Second Lieut.. Headquarters, Marine Corps 

NAVAL AVIATORS 

Vannai . Lion, '43 Cadet. Naval Aviation. 

Evans, Halbert Knapp Ensign, Reserve. Squadron 1 A. N. A. S.. Pen 

sacola, Florida. 
Connelly, John Vincent, '38 — Ensign, Naval Reserves. 
DAVY, CHARLES D., '37 Ensign, Naval Reserves. 
Faulkner, Edgar Frederic, '41 -Naval Aviation Cadet, Jacksonville, Fla 

UNITED STATES NAVY 
Anthony, Edwin Rumsey, Jr.. '39 — Ensign, Washington. I). C. 
BELL, John Wei. don. '37- -Ensign, Bureau of Supplies anil Accounts, Navy 

Department, Washington, D. C. 
Brown, John Wilson, Jr., '40 — Navy Reserve, on call. 
Early, Ferdinand (changed from Goldstein, Ferdinand), '37 Ensign. 
Johnson, David Okey, '41 Active training with Naval Reserve. Class \'-7 
Lewis, Albert Francis. '41— Ensign, I". S. S. Monssen, care Postmaster. 

New York City. 
Lai'ghead, Robert W., '41 Ensign A-V (S). Bureau of Aeronautics, 

Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 
Newman (Dr.). Edward Arthur, Jr.. '35 Ensign, Naval Reserve, 

H(\')S 
Wright, Audrey Bosley, '39 Naval Reserve. Box No. 1717. Balboa, 

Canal Zone. Asst. Clerk. 



Ad Club Sponsors Program 

The Advertising Club of Baltimore sponsored a Uni 
versify of Maryland program at their weekly luncheon 
February 11. Dr. II. C. Bvrd was to be the guest of 
honor and principal scakcr, but due to a call from the 
Federal Government in Washington he was unable to 
be present. In his place, Dr. Gewehr, Chairman of the 
Department of History, gave a talk on the historical de- 
velopments of the present world conflict. It was a very 
enlightening and stirring talk. 

Mr. A. N. Childs, President of the Club, presided. 
Dr. Bunning, President of Lovola College, introduced 
the speaker. Mr. Benes, brother of the former President 
of Czechoslovakia, gave a few remarks. 

Members of the Alumni were invited to attend the 
luncheon and among those present were Charles W. 
Sylvester, '08; D. W. Glass, '11; L. M. Kantner, '09; 
Walter P. Dent, Jr.. '32; H. C. Hcam. '97; Gerald F. 
Brandon, '16; Timothy Ileatwole, '95; C. G. Branner, 
'24; James Stevens, '17; James M. Swart/., '19; Leonard 
I. Davis, '21; W. Buckcv Clemson. '21; Austin C. DiggS, 
'21; Charles Movlan. '24; Dr. F. W. Swinchart. '12; Dr. 
). Ben Robinson. '14; Dr. Bcrton Idc. '02; Dr. A. G 
DuMez, Dean, School of Pharmacy. At the tables re- 
served for Alumni there were also "Jake" Fmbrv of 
Station WBAL; Mr. J. F. Yacth. Superintendent of 
Western Union Telegraph Co., and Mr. William C 
Smith, sales manager for the same company. 



lOMMENCEMENT, May 30 




DEATH OF ROY MACKERT IS GREAT LOSS TO UNIVERSITY 

Maryland lost one of its ablest assets and a genuine friend when Charles 
Lcroy (Mac) Mackert, '21, succumbed aftei a long illness on February 12. 

His home was in College Heights, adjacent to the University, bul he was in 
Garfield Hospital m Washington at the tune of Ins death. I lis loss w ill be fell 
and mourned indefinitely. He was a native ol Sunbury, Pa., where lie was 

buried. 

Mae. who was associated with the University foi more than twentj years 

as an able student, athlete and teacher, leaves a widow. Hazel Tenney 
Mackert, also a graduate of the University, ami a 10-yeai old son. Charles 
Leroy, Jr. They have the great consolation ol knowing thc\ have the supreme 
sympathy and friendship of the entire University community. 

After going from Lebanon Valley College into the Army as a Lieutenant 
in the field artillery and serving until World War I ended. Mackert came 
to Maryland in the Fall of 1919 and for the next two years was the outstand- 
ing player on the football team, being the only one ever to make the all 
State eleven as both tackle and fullback. 

He also was conspicuous in student publication work, being editor of the 
weekly paper in his senior year. He remained at Maryland after his graduation 
in 1921 and continued his studies while helping to coach football and scout. 
He earned his Master's Degree in 1924 and in 192" was granted a leave of absence to take up advanced physical 
education work at Columbia University in New York, lie came back to Maryland in 1931 as director of physical 
education and was untiring in putting that department on its high plane. He also continued to help with foot 
ball, his keen ability as a scout being a big contribution. 

He was a member of Kappa Alpha Social Fraternity and an honorary member of Pi Helta Epsilon, national 
journalistic honorary organization. 

The 1921 yearbook, then the Terra Mariae, spoke some salient truths about Mac when it said: 

"Mac is the personification of real college spirit. When he joined the football team. Man land immediately 
became the terror of the South. Inspired by the same spirit of loyalty, his counsel and sacrifice and knowledge 
of student psychology has helped to put student actiyities upon the highest plane. As editor of the Review, 
he has displayed rare genius." 

At the funeral service in St. Andrew's Church in College Park on February 14, Dr. II. C. (Curly) Byrd, 
President of the University and Mac's football coach, paid a tribute to his pal and fellow -worker that belongs 
to few persons. His words testified fully that Mac had carried with him into his life's work the same qualities, 
that had endeared him to his fellow students in his undergraduate clays. 

You have onlv to talk with the boys who worked under him and the students whom he taught to find 
this out. 



Cu vki is I a u<n \l V( Kl ki . '21 



Haines, '96, Gives For Defense 

When this country went to war, Mahlon N. Haines. 
'96, asked, "What can I do now to help my country?" 
His reply, "I can and will, help my country by giving 
to the Red Cross and buying Defense Bonds." He then 
led the Red Cross drive for York County, Pa., by making 
six different contributions to the Red Cross totaling 
over $1200. Then he gave an order for a SI 00 Defense 
Bond to be ready for him at his bank every Wednesday 
in the year 1942'. 

"I can, and will, support my President and my Gov- 
ernment and do all within my power to cheer the people 
at home and will not forget the bovs carrying arms for 
the defense of our country. This is to help put Japan 
back on her island where she belongs and clear the world 
of dictators." said Haines. 



FELLOW ALUMNI 

(Continued from page 3) I wish to say more about 

the Grand Reunion on May 29. Even though the war is 
on and main are up to their necks in war efforts, we can 
at least take one afternoon off and spend it with our 
old friends. We also plan to make an extra effort t 
all the bovs who arc in cantonments nearby to 
back for the day so we can show them our interest in 
what thev arc doing. Now is the time when we need to 
show our combined efforts for a more unified organiza 
Hon. Our University needs us. our State needs us and 
our Country needs us. Make up your minds now to join 
Alumni in pushing things forward foi a 



your fellow 

greater Association. 



Sincerely yours, 

V V I' vkki k. Ms /'resident. 



ALUMNI DAY, Mav 29 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Basketers Fare Poorly 
Through Bad Shooting 

Maryland's basket ball team was com 
pleting its season when tins was written 
and for the second year in a row the I'erps 
were tailing far below tlieir standard. 

With V. M. I. as the final foe. the team 
had won only 6 games in 21. the only time 
the I'erps had been on the wrong side of 
the ledger in two years in a row since Bur 
ton Shipley took the helm in the 1923-24 
campaign. 

Ernie Travis, who went beyond the 300 
mark in points to average about 1 5 per 
game and Tommy Mont, who averaged 8 
per contest, were the only 'I'erps who could 
find the basket with any consistency. Roth 
Travis and Mont are sophs. 

It was lack of shooters which held the 
team back, as the tosscrs played a fine floor 
game, showed plenty of grit and always 
were in fine fettle physically. 

A good example was given in the North 
Carolina game, which was lost, 30-34. 
Maryland, by the count of the Tar I led 
scorer, had 87 shots to 61 for victors. That 
is about typical of most of the contests. 

The I'erps really were hot in their shoot 
ing just one night and then they handed 
Georgetown a si to 42 beating in Wash 
ington to score one of the biggest upsets 
of the season in this section. 

It was the second straight time the toss- 
crs failed in a bid to the Conference tour- 
ney, the only times they have "flunked'' 
in the 1°- years the event has been held. 
They didn't go in 193 3. although they 
qualified, as they had to stay home to meet 
schedule obligations that conflicted with 
the title affair. 



DEELEY COACHING B. A. C. 

Ilaskin (Hack) Deeley, former Terp la- 
crosse goalie, is coaching the Baltimore 
A. C. squad this season, and he also ex- 
pects to see much action. He tutored the 
Baltimore Poh stickmen for three seasons. 



Tom Corwin, '35, At 27, 
Is Captain In Army 

Tom Corwin. now officially Capt. Thos. 
P. Corwin of the U. S. Army, has risen 
rapidly since he took his degree from 
Maryland in 193 S. He managed the base 
ball team that season and was active in 
other campus affairs. He came to Mary 
land from Tech High in Washington at 
the age of 16 and now is only 27. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Royal E. Corwin of 
the Capital City. 

While at Maryland he held the rank of 
senior major in the R. O. T. C. and was 
commissioned a first lieutenant in the 
Army in June, 1939, after three years of 
extension work as a Reserve officer. He will 
finish a course in law this year at George- 
town and already is a member of the Dis- 
trict bar. His wife also is a member of the 
bar. 

Captain Corwin, in active service since 
last March, was teller in Riggs National 
Bank in Washington before his induction. 



TINGLEY IS POSTMASTER 

Egbert Tingley, who was captain of the 
Maryland tennis team in 1927, now is post- 
master at Hyattsville, Md. Previously he 
had served in the State Legislature. 



(Boxing) 

(Continued from next page) 

may be shelved from an injured hand suf 
fercd in the match with the Tar Heels. 

Judson Lincoln, a shorty, who has won 
four bouts, drew one and lost two. and 
Jack Gilmore. hard-luck guy of the team, 
will fill the 12" and 165-pound berths. 
Lincoln is consistent and Gilmore is ca 
pable of being the big upsettcr. 

Maryland's record for the season: 

Maryland. 4: South Carolina. 4 

Maryland. 3; U. S. Coast Guard Acad . 5 

Maryland. 6; Western Maryland. 2 
Maryland. 3^4; Virginia, i\ 2 

Maryland. 5; Catholic U., 3 

Maryland, 6; Virginia Tech, 2 

Maryland, 5; North Carolina. 3. 



Alexander Makes Last 
Bid In Title Meet 






Three letter men and a pair of sophs 
carried the main hopes of the Maryland 
trackmen in the Southern Conference meet 
at Chapel Hill, February 28. 

Duke Alexander, the versatile soph, who 
goes into the Marine Corps on March 4. 
was in the high jump, in which he has 
done 6 feet 2 indoors this winter and in 
which he has a record of 6 feet 4 1 -* in the 
low hurdles and broad jump. 

Letter men Bob Condon and Randall 
Cronin in the half-mile and Bob Mont 
gomery in the 440. and Stirling Kehoe, 
soph brother of the famous Jim, in the 
mile, were other outstanding entrants. The 
first three named also were to run on the 
relay team. 

Rookies Pat Carolan and Howard Gugel 
were in the 60-yard dash. Gugel is a Terp 
soph while Carolan came to Man land last 
fall from Harrison Stone-Jackson Junior 
College of Mississippi. 

Maryland is losing, temporarily at least, 
one of its finest athletes in Alexander. He 
played end on the football team last fall 
and was voted the best soph lineman in 
the State in an Associated Press poll. 

As a freshman trackman, he competed 
in 23 events in six dual meets, winning 
19 firsts. 2 seconds and 2 thirds. He swept 
the high jump and low hurdles and got 
most of the points in the broad jump and 
javelin throw. Although the javelin really 
was a side issue, he reached ISO feet 2 
inches. He also won the Conference fresh 
man high jump crown. 



Lombardo Recreation 
Head For Marines 

Lieut. Mike Lombardo, former Man 
land boxing star and later assistant coach 
and head coach in 1941, now is chief rec- 
reation officer for the Marine Corps base 
at Quantico. 

I Ic was graduated in 193". 




MARYLAND'S BOXING SQUAD — First Row (seated): foe Cicala, 120; [udson Lincoln, 127; torn fones, 135; 

Hotsy Alperstein, 145; Alex Bobenko, 155. Second Row — Lieut. Harold Kelley, freshman coach; Managei 

Charles II. Smelser; Jack Gilmore, 165; I'at Quinn, 155; Harrj Fisher, 165; Herb Gunther, 175; 

Lcn Ridiiiaii. heavyweight; Bobbv Goldstein, coach. 



Boxing Team, Which Enjoys Successful Campaign, 
To Compete In Eastern Intercollegiate Tourney 



Maryland's boxing team, which finished 
the season with four triumphs, a tie and 
two defeats when it scored over North 
Carolina. 5-3, February 21, is keeping 
timed for the Eastern Intercollegiate tour- 
ney at Charlottesville March 6 and 7. 

The Tcrps have a well balanced team 
but will rank below Virginia, the host; 

Syracuse and the Coast Guard. Maryland's 

only losses were to the Cavaliers. 3Vi to 
4':, and to the Coast Guard, 3 to i. and 
these two. with the Orange, appear to be 
the tops in the East. 

Maryland will present three title threats 
in Tom Jones and Ilotsy Alperstein. un- 
beaten in the Is vand 145-pound classes, 
respectively, and Herb Gunther, 175- 
pound Southern Conference champion, 



who regained his old form after a non too 
impressive start. 

Joe Cicala, the greenest sort of a rookie 
at the start of the season, also was flashy 
in taking Ins last two bouts and may make 
trouble. I .en Rodman, heavyweight, who 
hasn't fully lived up to expectations, is 
another who showed much improvement 
in his last pair of scraps. 

Maryland appears jinxed m the 155 
pound class. Pat Oiunii. who was doing a 
fine job, was put out for the season In an 
injury in the Catholic U. fight Februarj 
ami now \le\ Bobenko, Ins successor, aftei 
two gratifying showings in losmt; bouts. 



(see Boxing, previous page), 



Mat Team Is Entered 
In Title Tournament 

Maryland is sending a full wrestling 
team to the Southern Conference cham 
pionships at Greensboro, \ C. March 
5 7, but as the squad has won onh two of 
its eight matches with one remaining, docs 
not figure as a real contender. 

Bob Sc.uK. 135-pounder, who won six 
of eight i ontests, and I uthci Boots 
Conrad, heavyweight, seeing his fust yeai 
ol action, appeai as the rerps' best bets. 

Conrad, all State tooth. ill end. won four 
of the si\ tests he found tunc to indulge 
in lie lost In-, fust match on a fall, later 
dropped a 7-8 decision and made quick 
work ot In-, tour othei foes lh disposed 
of one opponent in 45 seconds and threw 
two others in less than five minutes each 



IT'S CHESTERFIELD 

says LOIS JANUARY 

Star of Stcge and Screen 








always Milder and Better-Tasting 

alwayS Cooler- Smoking., .that's what makes Chesterfield 
the steady smoke of more smokers every day. You can count on 
Chesterfields to give you, day in and day out, more smoking pleasure 
than you ever had before.. . So make your next pack Chesterfield and 
its right combination of the world's finest cigarette tobaccos will go 
to work to give you all you want in a cigarette 



Tkey&dfiSfitf 







ALUMNI 
NEWS 



n o 

.- 

.-' ■-: 
a 
[ 
a • 




MARCH, 1942 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS. MARCH. 1942 



Number 10 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Longridge, '29 Education 

|. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28. . . .Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 
Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary, Frederick, Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 



James W. 
Myron B. 


Stevens, 

Stevens, 


"M' 

'19 


CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 




'27 


Vice-President Edwin E. Powell, '13 













SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 



W. M. Kisiii-auch, '17 Football 

Kiii> ik SEMLER, '23 Baseball 

TlI.GHMAN 1'.. Makiii-.n, '25 Lacrosse 

II. li. Shipley, Ml Basket Ball 

Seymour \V. Ruff, '17 Track 

Egbert Ti ngley, '27 Tennis 

Talbot T. Sfeeh, '17 Cross Country 



Fran k Haw kins, '34 Boxvng 

Dr. Buckey Clemson, D.D.S., '21 1 

James M. Swart/., '19 | 

Jerre H. Sullivan, '21 J ...At Large 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, M.D.. '04 | 

Lee Pennington '15 I 

G. F. Pollock, '23 j 



COVER PICTURE 



■ 



The Library steps in the Spring- 
time. This is probably the most pop- 
ular spot on the campus. Centrally 
located and facing the East for the 
morning sun and in the Summer- 
time the afternoon shade makes it 
an inviting spot. All students who 
have attended the College Park 
schools in the past ten years need 
not be told about the location of 
this building. Those Alumni who 
were at College Park prior to 1931 
can picture the Library just in front 
of the grove of oak trees on top of 
the Hill and in front of Morrill Hall 
and where the old Dining Hall used 
to stand. The Library seems to be 
the hub of the campus, as everything 
usually turns from there. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

It is with deepest regret we note 
the passing of one of our most valu- 
able Alumni and a member of the 
Faculty for a number of years, 
Charles Leroy Mackert, '21. "Mac", 
known to a large number of gradu- 
ates, typified all that was good in a 
man, and his going will leave a void 
that will be hard to fill. The Alumni 
extend our sympathy to his family 
in their bereavement, and, at the 
same time, congratulate them upon 
the intimate sharing of a life of such 
grand proportions as that exhibited 
by "Mac". His memory and example 
will live long with his friends at 
Maryland. 

Alumni Day 

If not already known to you, take 
notice now. The date of the Com- 
( Continued on page 5) 



M Club To Hold Spring Party 

On The Campus, May 8th 

It has been announced by fames \\ . Stevens. "19, 
president of the "\l" Club, thai the annual Spring Partj 
for nil "M" men and prospective students will be held 
on Friday, May 8, in the University Dining Hall. A 

buffet supper will be served .it 7 P. M., followed by a 
few short talks and an entertaining program. In the aft- 
ernoon the baseball team have a game with William 
and Mary at 4 P. M.. to which all are invited to attend. 

As the newly appointed Director of Health and Phys 
ieal Recreation Department, Mr. Clark Shaughnessy, 
will be on the campus, it is expected that he will be 
among the speakers. At the time this was written Mr. 
Shaughnessy had not been contacted but we feel sure 
he will be around. 

Jimmy Stevens says every "M" Club member should 
get busy now and look up the real prospects in Man- 
land High Schools and bring them as their guests to the 
party. Watch the next issue of the News for a more 
detailed program. Save the date now and plan to be 
present. 

• • e 

Mause, '39, With R. A. F. 

John David Mausc, '39, a member of Alpha Lambda 
Tau, now is with the Royal Air Force. Mausc was pre- 
viously turned down by the United States Army Air 
Force, after which he tried the R. A. F., was accepted 
and assigned to training in America. He completed his 
training last Fall after having had quite an episode dur- 
ing that period. While on flight maneuvers near San 
Diego, California, he scared the ducks on Clark Gable's 
private game reserve for which he was grounded four 
days. 

Since the United States has entered the war Mause 
will very likclv be transferred to the United States Army 
Air Corps with the rank of Captain. His home is in 
Mversville, Md. 



Spicknall, '33, In Germany 

Dr. Charles G. Spicknall, '33, special medical attache 
to the American Embassy in Germany, is reported safe 
in Bad Nauheim on Lake Constance at the German- 
Swiss border awaiting arrangements for an exchange of 
diplomatic staffs. Spicknall, a resident of Hvattsvillc, 
was the recipient of The James Goddard Memorial 
Medal while in college for outstanding scholastic 
achievement. 



Army — Lieut. Richard O'Neill has been ordered at station 
somewhere in the Caribbean area. 



Gen. Silvester, 'II, Heads Seventh 

Armored Division 

From Camp I 'oik. Louisiana, word arrives thai Majoi 
General Lindsaj Silvester, '11, formei football 
tin the ( )ld 1 iners and forme i pr< id< nl v 1 

Club, I k.kN the Seventh Armored Division. Phis is part 
of the Armored Corps which is undo th< command 
oi Majoi Genera] Alvan C Gillem, formei P \1 s 
S I at the University. General Silvestei i in oi 

the last VVorld Wai in winch he received th< Distin 

guished Service CrOSS and the Silvi i St.n I I 

uate of the Armj Wai College, the Command and 
Genera] Stall School. 

Another Alumnus is at Camp I 'oik. C apt am (Man 
E. Geiger, '27, of the Headquarters Stall of the Third 
Armored Division. Captain Geiger is a lawyei bv pro 
tession. but has been in the Army for the past two years, 
lie has had various assignments from command of a 
held artillery to his present position in the Armored 
Division. 

• 00 

Dr. Robinson, '14, Receives Award 

Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity confers annually an 
award of merit upon that member of the dental profes- 
sion whose leadership, service and contributions have 
been judged to be outstanding for the year in character 
and influence. On the evening of December 30, 1941, 
Dean J. Ben Robinson of our Dental School was hon- 
ored by having conferred upon him the 1941 Achieve- 
ment Award in the form of a beautiful specially designed 
bronze medallion. Alpha Omega Fraternity was founded 
in the School of Dentistry, University of Maryland in 
1907, and now has active chapters in thirty-two of the 
thirty-nine dental schools. Dr. \1. S. Aisenberg, '26. 
Professor of Oral Pathology, Dental School, University 
of Maryland, presented the award. 

• • • 

Marries At Honolulu 

Miss Ann Ames, '41, and Capt. Joseph Russell Grove 
of the U. S. Army were married December 22 in the 
Methodist Church. Honolulu. Ann was at Schoheld 
Barracks with her sister when the attack was made on 
Pearl Harbor. Two bombs intended for general head- 
quarters just missed the house in which she was staying. 
Even machine gun bullets spattered about the house 
from Japanese planes riving low. 

• • • 

Married — Miss Virginia Lombard Brown and Mr. I eo A 

Jackovvski, Jr., were married last month. The newlyweds will re 
side in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where both will do graduate study 

at the University of Michigan. 



Puget Sound Navy Yard 

Word floats in that Marion P. Sutton, '35, now is 
ant cashier of the Kitsap County Bank at Port Or- 
chard, Washington. Port Orchard is just across a small 
buy from the Puget Sound Navy Yard. 

Soon after war broke out large contingents of the 
Army moved in. Among the officers was Lieut. Norwood 
Sothoron, '34. A Maryland meeting resulted. 

Prior to going to Kitsap, Sutton was in the Pacific 
National Bank in Seattle; here he met Red Graham, U. 
S. A., now on duty at San Francisco, where it is under- 
stood Smoky Wood is also located. 

Richard Sutton, '36, is in another part of the world. 
He now is an extension agent at Christonstad, St. Croix, 
Virgin Islands. Dick had previously been in Venezuela, 
where he met the present Mrs. Sutton. 

The Sutton family, I would say, is quite well sepa- 
rated. 

• • • 

Oldest Druggist Retires 

As Dr. J. Louis Krick, '87, Ph.C, locked the door at 
his store at 1742 Pennsylvania avenue, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D. C, and entered retirement, he closed one of 
the city's oldest drug firms. For 64 years Dr. Krick had ' 
carried on his drug business here. He began his career 
in drugs before entering the U. of Md. College of Phar- 
macy, and upon graduation settled in Washington. 

The nearness of his store to the White House brought 
him much business from there in his early days. He had 
Theodore Roosevelt, Benjamin Harrison, and many 
others on his books. 

Dr. Krick says drug stores used to be drug stores, but 
now they are sandwich shops and cheap merchandise 
peddlers. 

He remembers the horse-drawn street cars. His plans 
call for traveling in his retirement by land, sea or air. 

• • • 

Annual Card Party And Dance 
April 10 By Women's Board 

On April 10, at the Alcazar in Baltimore, the 
Women's Auxiliary Board of the University Hospital 
will hold their Annual Card Party and Dance for the 
benefit of the Free Wards and Clinics in the University 
Hospital. 

The members of this philanthropic organization have 
performed great work for the hospital and the general 
public. More than $5,000 has been raised by the organ- 
ization and given to the hospital for various things 
needed for the Free Wards. Every Alumnus should feel 
it a pleasure to contribute something to this worthy 
cause. All contributions will be gladly received by the 
Alumni office and conveyed to the Women's Board. 



Just Returned From China 

When Dr. E. N. Cory, '09, was in California attend- 
ing a national Entomology Convention he came across 
F. W. Fritchie, '34, who had just returned from the Far 
East. Dr. Cory was standing at the telegraph desk in 
San Francisco and, when asking for information about 
a telegram to the University of Maryland was inter- 
rupted by a man who said he was from the University, 
thus a conversation and the following narrative. 

Fritchie had been in the Far East as construction en- 
gineer for the Pacific Naval Air Base Construction Co., 
building air bases for China. He left China on the day 
war broke out and by accident successfully came through. 
The boat on which he was traveling was scheduled to 
make a stop but instead changed their course and made 
a get away. However, the boat was machine gunned but 
no casualties. They landed in San Francisco on January 

2. His address is 2669 Edgevale Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 

• • • 

BIRTH 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Heagv announce the arrival 
of Albert, Jr., on March 18, another Terp gridiron star, 
like Dad, in about 20 years. Mrs. Heagv was the former 
Miss Elizabeth Gover of Hyattsville, Md. "Pop" is none 
other than "Al" Heagv, president of the Class of 1930 
and former gridiron star. Now he is in the Inspection 
and Regulatory Service for the University and assists in 
athletic coaching. The Heagys reside in University Park. 



Jim Kehoe And Billy Cole 
Enter Officers School 

Jim Kehoe, '41, the former Terp cinder track star, 
now is attending officers' school at Fort Benning, Ga. 
Billy Cole, '41, one of the best lacrosse centers to ever 
have worn the Black and Gold, goes to Fort Knox, Kv. 
Both were inducted into the service at Camp Meade 
and served their enlistment period there with the 29th 
Division. 

While at Fort Meade, Kehoe served as an assistant 
to his former track coach, Major Geary Epplcv, '18, who 
was morale officer and director of athletics. Now Major 
Eppley has been transferred to Washington and is lo- 
cated at the Army War College with the ground force 
department. 

Billy Cole is the son of Congressman Wm. P. Cole, 
Jr., '10, Maryland's senior Congressman in Washington. 

John B. Gunter, Jr., '41, from Johnstown, Pa., and a 
member of the 116th Infantry Headquarters Company, 
has been sent to the Quartermaster Corps Officers' 
Training School. 

The above notes were taken from the Chin Strap, 
a 29th Division publication. 



FELLOW ALUMNI 

(Continued from page 3) mencemcnt lias been ad- 
vanced, and will be held on May 30th. Commencement 
Day— May 30th and Alumni Day— May 29th. 

The changes in these dates have been made necessary 
due to the stepping up of the curriculum, and there 
may be other changes of dates in the months to come 
as a result of the same cause. Keep tuned in on the News 
for information. Also make a special effort to be present 
on Alumni Day— May 29th. Start now with your plans 
to attend the Golden Anniversary of the Alumni As 
sociation. 

Since there are a large number of our boys in the 
service, scattered over the whole world, let's all let the 
editor of the News have any items concerning them 
that may come to your attention. It will be most inter- 
esting to them to know of each other's activities, as well 
as being a material help to our editor. 

Here is a chance for all who are interested in Mary- 
land teams to show just how material is their interest. 
Due to the stepping up of the schedule, with classes 
going on during the summer, there are a number of 
our athletes who are going to need immediate financial 
aid. In other years they worked during the Summer and 
were able to earn' their own loads. That privilege now 
is denied them and the opportunity to help is ours. The 
need is immediate. Let our action be the same, and here 
is my suggestion: 

Let every Alumnus make a donation toward an Ath- 
letic Scholarship Fund to be used in helping out our 
worthy students who, because of today's unusual con- 
ditions, will either have to be given aid or be forced 
to discontinue their educational endeavor. 

Let us call it a Mackert Memorial Scholarship Fund 
for worthy students to help bolster our athletic program. 
Send in your donations at once, and come on Alumni 
Day, for the Annual Meeting, to help arrange for the 
handling and perpetuation of the same. Donations from 
five thousand graduates would make a splendid nucleus. 
The sky is the limit— give what you feel you can, and 
send it to our Secretary, Mr. G. F. Pollock, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. No amount is 
too small to be appreciated and helpful, and any amount 
will be accepted and useful. 

We have heard a lot about unpreparedness. Let us 
take a lesson from it, and start now with an annual 
donation to the Mackert Memorial Scholarship Fund 
so that when times are again normal, you may expect 
to see the Maryland name and teams in their proper 
position at the head of the van. 

Send your check now. Bring yourself and ideas on 
May 29th. Golden Anniversary Alumni Meeting. 
Sincerely yours, 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Clark Shaughnessy Heads Md. Athletics 

Clark Shaughnessy, who gave Stanford an un 

football season and a Rose Bowl triumph ovei Neb 

in his fust year there in 1940, is i oming to Maryland to 

be Director of Physical Education, Athletic Din 

and head football co.ich. He'll be .it Colli I 

in April and doubtless will hold Spring football pi.i 

Shaughnessy, landed Eoi Maryland through the per« 
suasive powers of President II. C. (Curie; Byrd, is 

about the bluest name m football at present and surely 
is among the three best mentors in the count 
ever, he is an educator and physical fitness man Inst 
That he can do both jobs goes without question and 
Terp grid fortunes should rise spccdih along with the 
advance of the program for more rugged men. 

Shaughnessy leaped to fame with the famous ! 
formation but his football education includes all types 
of grid play, backed by the abilih to make the system 
fit the men available. 

lie is a product of Minnesota, where he starred as i 
fullback and in track and basket ball, although he had 
not taken part in sports before going to collegi 

lie was graduated from Minnesota in 1914 and 
coached there a year before going to Tulanc. lie also 
coached at Loyola of the South and Chicago before 
going to Stanford. lie was a standout mentor at all save 
Chicago, where football was on its way out when he 
went there. He is 50 years old and has a wife, a son and 
two daughters, with all of the children being in college 
on the Pacific coast. 

While Shaughnessv has been given the authority to 
pick his own aides it seems certain that all those now 
leaders in Tcrp athletics will be taken care of in the new 
set-up, which will bring a compulsory physical educa- 
tion program for all students. 

• • • 

Former Asst., P. M. S. & T., 
Shines In The Philippines 

A former member of the University's Military Staff 
is mentioned for gallantry in directing and leading his 
battalion in a successful attack on the Japanese in Ba- 
taan. The man is Lieutenant Colonel Fdward Bowes. 
A note from a California paper said that Colonel Bowes. 
taking direct command, led his battalion inch by inch 
to gain a new objective and eliminate several machine 
gun implacements. 

Colonel Bowes was at the University in the late 
twenties, was quite a popular officer and was well liked 
in the community. In addition to his teaching he served 
as coach of the rifle team which came into national 
limelight. 

Also in the Philippines is Lieutenant Ed. Lloyd, 
former Tcrp gridiron star. It is possible that Colonel 
Bowes and Lieutenant Lloyd have met before this. 






Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Spring Athletic Squads Appear To Be Powerful Enough 
To Hold Their Own With Majority Of Their Rivals 



Having toiled for about three weeks, 
Maryland's Spring sports teams in base- 
ball, lacrosse, track and tennis were about 
on edge for actual competition and in good 
trim to make it interesting for the oppo- 
sition. 

All of the teams have some problems, 
of course, but apparently arc strong enough 
to rate about a 50-50 chance, or better, 
against most of their rivals. 

Veterans who form the nucleus of the 
nine are Pitchers Max Hunt, Bob Smith, 
and Lefty Bill Fulton, Catcher Kenny 
Bransdorf, infielders Mearle DuVall, Ros- 
coc Whipp, Jim Wharton, and Joe Hoop- 
engardner, who also has slab aspirations, 
and outfielder Dan Boothe. 

Leading newcomers in the squad of 
about 25 are Jack Brenner, catcher; Ernie 
Travis, Clark Hudak and Jim Kinsman, in- 
fielders; Harold Evans, outfielder, and 
Hartley Crist, pitcher, who also is a ca- 
pable outfielder and hitter. 

Travis had to undergo a knee opera- 
tion from an injury suffered in basket ball 
and will miss half the games at least. His 
loss was a severe blow. 

Many Ace Stickmen Lost 

Although lacrosse lost heavily by grad- 
uation and to the service, there is a strong 
backbone for a good team among the 28 
aspirants. Jim Forbes, goalie, and Bob 
Fetters, cover point, arc the only 1941 de- 
fense regulars on hand, but the attack is 
better set with Ray Grelecki, Milt Van- 
dcnBcrg, Landis Hill and Bill McGregor, 
who was shelved most of last season from 
a bad leg. 

Main hopefuls up from last year's frosh 
arc Barnett Broughton, goalie; Bill Taylor, 
Jack Dittmar, Warren Eierman, and El- 
wood Armacost, defense, and Bill Tarbert 
and John Hogert, midfielders. However, 
a stickman who is aiding neatly is Bob 
Stockbridge, a midfielder, who transferred 



from Washington College and had to 
wait a year to become eligible. 

Track, Net Squads Fair 

Ace track leftovers are Louis Chacos, 
sprinter; Bob Montgomery, 220 and 440; 
Randall Cronin, 440 and 880; Bob Con- 
don, half mile; Stanley Kihn, two-miler; 
Jack Gilmore, Southern Conference out- 
door high jump champion; Luther Conrad, 
shot and discus, and Bill Tilley, broad 
jumper. 

Rookies who doubtless will give the 
team a tremendous lift include Tiny Horn, 
shot and discus; Bob James, hurdles and 
javelin; Carlos Englar, pole vaulter, and 
Howard Gugel and Pat Carolan, sprinters. 
Horn has tossed the discus in competition 
over 148 feet and has done 164 in practice. 

Doyle Royal, Harry Baugher, Hyman 
Berg, Elwood Bates, and Slater Clarke are 
left from last year's tennis team. Some 
good talent will come from the 1941 frosh, 
and DeWitt Smith, an able racketer, who 
was out of school for a time, is back. 

All of the teams, except baseball, were 
on the right side of the ledger last Spring. 
The stickmen won 8 of 11 games, the 
racketcrs took 10 of 13 matches, the track - 
sters captured 4 of 7 dual meets, but the 
diamonders could grab only 7 of 25 
contests. 

• 

TOO FEW GOOD SCORERS 

ON BASKET BALL TEAM 

A look at the statistics is all that is 
needed to explain why Maryland's basket 
ball team won only seven of 22 games 
during the past season. 

Ernie Travis counted 327 points, Tom 
Mont, 180, and the four other leaders 
gathered only 202 among them. 

Of the 802 points scored by the entire 
squad, Travis and Mont made 507, the 
former accounting for 41 per cent of the 
total. Five of the six tossers were sophs. 



Champion Boxing Squad 
Has Only One Senior 

Hotsy Alperstein, 145-pounder, will be 
the only boxer lost by graduation from the 
Maryland team — invited to fill in — 
which won the Eastern Intercollegiate 
tourney title at Charlottesville March 6 
and 7. 

The Terps took only 10 of 18 actual 
bouts in their triumph. They won 5 out 
of 6 in the first round, which, with two 
byes, advanced seven men. They then an- 
nexed 5 of 7 semifinals to have all their 
boys lose out in the finals. 

Boxers Who Scored 

In addition to Alperstein, the scorers 
were Joe Cicala, 120; Judson Lincoln, 127; 
Jack Gilmore, 165; and Herb Gunther, 175. 
Josh Hughes, 155, was put out in the first 
round, and Tom Jones, 135, and Len Rod- 
man, heavy, went out in the semis. 

This gave Maryland 15 points and 
enough to nose out the title-defender, Svr- 
acusc, which scored 13 with two champs 
and a runner-up. 

Alperstein was the leader for the sea- 
son, including the tourney, winning 9 of 
10 battles; Jones was next with 7 wins, one 
loss and a draw, with Lincoln standing 
6 — 3 — 1, Gunther 6 — 3 — 0, and Cicala 
5 — 5 — 0. They were the only ones with 
.500 or better. 

In dual meets, Maryland won 4, lost 2 
and drew one, so altogether it was a great 
season for Bobby Goldstein, former Vir- 
ginia ring star, in his first year as coach. 

Is Homemade Team 

Maryland, too, can take unusual pride 
in its team, as it is strictly home-developed 
talent. Cicala, Lincoln, Jones and Gilmore 
are from the District of Columbia, while 
Alperstein, Hughes, Gunther and Rodman 
are Baltimoreans, and all of the other box- 
ers used during the regular season arc from 
one of these places. 



48 Contests Are Listed 
For Varsity Outfits 

Forty-eight contests, 2s of them ,it home 
and several others with nearb) foes, have 
been listed for the Maryland varsity teams 
in Spring sports — baseball, lacrosse, track 
and tennis. 

Baseball, as usual, tups in the number 
of games, with U) at home and .is man) 
abroad; lacrosse has its normal number of 
battles, but for the first time in years more 
will be played away than at College Park, 
with six of the ten Hits on foreign fields; 
four of the six dual track meets will be in 
Byrd Stadium, but the Terps also will 
travel for the I'enn Relays and the South 
em Conference title games, while the 
tennis team will be host in seven of its 
12 matches. 

Limited freshman schedules will have 
most of the events at College Park. 

A number of varsity contests with North 
ern and Southern teams were lost on ac- 
count of transportation problems and the 
early closing of some of the schools. 

Action was to start on April 2 with the 
lacrosse team entertaining Harvard, and 
the baseball squad starting a Dixie trip for 
six games by playing at Richmond U. 



Lucy Trundle Annexes 
Rich Bowling Prize 

Lucy Trundle, '39, a graduate of the Col- 
lege of Education, won the first woman's 
prize — a $500 defense bond — in the 
Washington Star's Defense Bond bowling 
tourney, recently completed. She rolled at 
the Silver Spring, Md., drives. 

Lucy is teaching and running physical 
education at Rockville High School. She- 
was prominent in girls' athletics and other 
activities while at College Park. Her home 
is in Ashton, Md. 

NINE IS WELL OFFICERED 

Maryland's ball team is well officered 
this Spring. Two of the four lieutenant 
colonels of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps Unit are on the roster and should 
be standouts. They are Pitcher Bob Smith 
and Jim (Pop) Wharton, who plays 
either the infield or outfield. 



SPRINCi SCHIDl LIS 
i All Events al College Park Unless Specified) 

BASEBALL 

April > al Richmond U ; :i and i al 
North Carolina; <> al Duke (double header) 
7 al Virginia; in ;it v. M. [.; n al Wa h- 

Ington and Lee; 16 — Michigan; 17 Wesl V.. 

22 Navy at Annapolis; 24 North Carolina 

29— Army al West Point, 

May 1 — Richmond U.; 2 Washington Col- 
lege; 4 — Virginia Tech; H Washington and 

Lee: 9 — Georgetown; ir> Randolph-Macon; 

20 — Georgetown at Washington 

LACROSSE 

April 2— Harvard; 4— Loyola; 11 Balti- 
more A C ; IX Army at West Point; 2.'> 
Ml. Washington at Baltimore; 2'.i I'enn Stale 
at State College. 

May 2— Princeton; t> Duke at Durham. 
9 — Rutgers at New Brunswick; 20 — Hopkins 
at Baltimore. 

TRACK 

April 4 — Virginia Tech at Blacksburi 

11— V. M. I.; 18— William and Mary al Wil 
liamsburg; 24 and 25 — Perm Relays. 

May 2— Duke; 4 — Virginia; 9 — Army; 16 — 
Southern Conference at Durham. 

TENNIS 

April 6 — at Richmond U.; 8 — Navy at An- 
napolis; 9 — St. John's of Brooklyn; 17 — Rich- 
mond U.; 18— Catholic U.; 29— Georgetown; 
30— Duke. 

May 2 — North Carolina: 4 — Hopkins; 8 - 
George Washington at Washington; 14 — Va. 
at Charlottesville; 16 — Georgetown at Wash- 
ington 



Fetters Is Well Versed 
In Defensive Tactics 

Bob Fetters, Maryland junioi athlete, 
should be well versed in defense by this 
time. He held down a defense job on the 
lacrosse team last Spring and is due to 
repeat this season; he played goalie on the 
unbeaten soccer squad last Fall and had 
only two points scored against him, and 
was a guard on the basket ball quint in 
the campaign recently ended. He nevei 
took part in sports at Baltimore Poly, 
where he prepped. 

Fetters is also a sergeant in the R. O. 
T. C the highest rating obtainable bj a 
junior. 

• 

STICK ACE HONOR STUDENT 

Ray Grelecki, who figures to be one of 
the leaders in Maryland's lacrosse attack 
tins Spring, is an honor student in the Col- 
lege of Education. He is a junior and went 
to Maryland from City College of Balti 
more. lie scored 12 goals last season. 

a 

GRIDDERS ARE YOUTHFUL 

Fifteen of the ZS members of the 1041 

Maryland freshman football squad will be 

onlj N years old or less by next Fall, live 

will be onlv IS then. 



Frosh Five Does Well 
With Limited Assets 

I Al 111 Inn. in 

baskcters, with a vcrj limited amount 
material, ended thcii campaign with nine 

wins in 1 i st i 

John Lookabaugh, the ■ 
I'ml I lick, tall. 200 pounders, and 
1 1 1 it i ii.in and Boh ( ulK n, <■ footers with 

out so iiiiu h lu tt. should help ' 
(it the \ .ir sit \ Ik \t year. 

Others on the squad of right I 
through ilu s< ison wi r< Morton 1 
Phil Campones In. I i .\ in I ngi Ibert and 
Boh Keene. Keene, a little fellow, wa 
flash) tlooi player. 

• 

Capable Boxing Talent 
On Freshman Squad 

The Terp freshman boxing team, which 
tied the Virginia yearlings at 4 all. and de 
feated the Western Maryland Clubs. 5 1 : 
to 2Vz, displayed some clevei talent. Lead 
ers were Basil Kambouris, 1Z~. tagel ( 
rea. 165, and Waltct Nechey, heavyweight. 

Nechey, who attended Charlotte Hall, 
will enter the army as a second lieutenant. 

1 [ere is the complete squad: 

120— Charley Knight. Capitol Heights. Md. 

127 — Basil Kambouris. Baltimore. 

135— Tom Snider. Hyattsville: Leon Gold- 
berg. Baltimore, and Warren Bvrd. 
Beltsville. 

145 — Hugo Di Michele. New York City. 

155 — Bill Gruber. Halelhorpe. Md. 

165 — Angel Correa. Washington. 

175 — Howard White. Washington, and John 
Lobell. Baltimore. 

Heavy— Walter Nechey (185). Baltimore. 

• 

TERPS HAVE DOUBLE GRIP 

ON TWO LOOP EVENTS 

Maryland boasts the Southern Confer 
ence track champions, both indoors and 
outdoors, in the half mile and high jump 
but two of the title-holders aie in the 
service. Ccne Ochsenreiter won the ssn 
last Spring ami Bob Condon followed suit 
last month, while in the high jump lack 
Gilmore carried off honors last Maj and 
Duke Alexander turned the trick in Feb 
ruary, 

Ochsenreiter went into the Arm) \ir 
C'oips last Decembei and Uexandei be 
came a Marine March 4. just four days 
after winning his crown. Condon is a 
senioi ami Gilmore is a junior. 



Chesterfield salutes with Millions of Fans 

THE GOLDEN JUBILEE 

of America'i most popular sport 

BASKETBALL 




£veri/ time m W 

It's 



Over 90,000,000 is Basketball's 
yearly attendance. . . tops for any American 
sport .. .and this year marks the celebra- 
tion of its Golden Jubilee. The game was 
founded by Dr. James Naismith and had its 
modest start in 1891 in Springfield, Mass. 
Such popularity must be deserved 



hesterfield 

. . . for Milder Better Taste 

for Cooler Smoking 

1 hat's what millions of Chesterfield smokers get 
every time they light up. ..and that's why these millions 
are saying Chesterfield gives me more pleasure than any 
other cigarette I ever smoked. 

Make your next pack Chesterfield and you too will 
enjoy everything you want in a cigarette ... made to 
your taste ivith the Right Combination of the world's 
best cigarette tobaccos. ^~ 

Every time . . . /keubaftZfiM 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 






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S cfiftietk Oftmlversari/ 

OfLumni Ljrana Jveunlou 
£ cfrioay, Jnai) signi, ig^ 



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<D O 




n|fl ') -Ibh br&i^h 




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IJJ 



Volume XIII 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, APRIL, 1942 



Number 11 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
1'ocomoke City, Md. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, first Vice-President Calvert Hills, Md. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

{Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '25; Mks. Emm Uuknside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, 17; ) P. Shaei-er, '2b Engineering 

M. LS. Stev ens, '2h: |. C I.ongridce, '29 Education 

|. M. Li scurf., '23; K L. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Mis-, Gi itrm ut Cmesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

L.LWOOD Armstrong, 26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Choi hers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Acjm-.s M< Nutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28 . . . . Women's Representatives 
I'. VV. Chiciilsi er, '2U Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland A-umni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
.it Collect' I'itrk, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
DALTIMOKE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Bane Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

liel Air. Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, *40, 

Soon t.irv. Frederick, Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY— Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32. Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADKLPIUA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias. '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, "38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

James W. Stevens, '19 President Dr. Ernest N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treasurer 

Myron B. Stevens, '27 Vice-President Edwin E. Powell, '13 Historian 

SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 



COVER PICTURE 

An inviting spot among the boys' 
New Dormitories. The new dorms 
arc located on the right front of 
Silvester Hall and face the Agricul- 
ture Building. Instead of one large 
dorm the new ones are in smaller 
units giving a more homey atmos- 
phere. 



\V. M. KlSHPAUGH, '17 Football 

Eddie Semler, '23 Baseball 

Tilghman I!. Marden, '25 Lacrosse 

H. I!. Shipley, '14 Basket Ball 

Seymour W. Ruff, '17 Track 

Egbert Tingley, '27 Tennis 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 Cross Country 



Frank Hawkins, '34 

Dr. Buckey Clemson, D.D.S., '21 

Iambs M. Swartz, '19 

Iikhk H. Sullivan, '21 

I)k. A. W. Valentine, M.D.. '04 

l.iK Pennington '15 

G. F. Pollock, '23 



..At Large 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

Another month and another scho- 
lastic year will be almost on us. No 
long (?) three months' vacation this 
year. 

Lots of things are to happen, how- 
ever, between now and the begin- 
ning of the next school year and 
among those happening on the Hill 
will be the Annual Track and Field 
Meet on May 2nd. At this time 
many of the outstanding high school 
athletes of the State are present and 
make their acquaintance with Mary- 
land. 

It is sincerelv hoped that Mary- 
land men over the State will sec to 
it that promising students and ath- 
letes make the trip to this annual 
affair. 

You have, I mean the Alumni, an- 
other opportunity if you have any 
particularly desirable young man in 
mind, of presenting him to Man- 
land and some of her heroes of the 
diamond, gridiron, track and field 
when the "M" Club put on their 
Spring party on May 8th. Get in 
touch with either Corv, Secretarv 
of the "M" Club, or Rosy Pollock, 
Secretary of the Alumni Association, 
(Continued on page 5) 



AS THEY HAVE FORMERLY GATHERED 

1907 1895 




191 2 



The Old Timers 



feuj, Alumni (letisUott, fytidcuf,. May 29 



Just a half-century ago your Alumni Association be- 
gan under the leadership of the late Hon. Melvin C. 
Hazen, '8". At the time of his death Mr. Hazen was 
chairman of the District of Columbia Board of Com- 
missioners. 

One of the outstanding classes of the association, 
1892, will also celebrate their fiftieth anniversary. Fred 
Beslev, Ed. Johnson, Frank Chew, and George Calvert, 
eighty per cent, of the surviving members, promise to be 
on hand to raise their flag in honor of the anniversarj . 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, will be the presiding mogul on 
this particular day, with the following program arranged. 
Registration, beginning at 10 A. M. in the lobby of the 
Administration Building; Flag Raising by the boys of 
1892 at 12:30; Annual Alumni Luncheon and Election 
of Officers; Presentation of Portrait of the late Dean 
Emeritus Thomas II. Spcnce, bv Messrs. James W. Ste- 
vens, '19, and James M. Swartz, '19; Remarks by Preston 
L. Peach, 'Ox recently returned from the Federated 
Malaya States, who kept one step ahead of the Japs. 

At 4 P. M. military commissions will be presented 
to those graduating in R. O. T. C. The ceremony will be 



held at the Flag Pole in front of the Library with Col. 

Robert E. Wvsor. Jr.. P. M. S. T. C. presiding. This 

is a colorful exercise and Alumni arc invited to attend. 

Shaughnessy To Speak 

In the evening the annual Alumni Dinner will be 
held in the University Dining Hall, with Mr. Clark 
Shaughnessy as the principal speaker, to be followed 
by a floor show. All who have attended the Dinner arc 
invited to attend the Commencement Ball in the Gym 
Armory as guests of the University. 

Ladies desiring to make changes of dress for the dance 
may be accommodated at either of the Girls' Dormi- 
tories. The men will find accommodations available at 
the Men's Dormitories. 

Automobile parking will be convenient at the Dairy 
Building, near the Ritchie Coliseum, and in the real 
of either Dormitorj 

Write all of your classmates to be on hand, as fellow 
ship makes the reunion, and this is where you can do 
your part. 

Friday, May 29. is the day! 



2.u&Uio*vi o.jf G&HceSitt ta 
an tUe ^JUtee-l/ecA, Plan 

What is the new "three-year" plan, and when does it 
go into effect? 
Answer: On June 19. 1942. the University of Man- 
land will begin to operate on a completely year- 
aronnd basis. Three full semesters of University work 
will be offered each calendar year, instead of but two 
as heretofore. 

Whv was the new plan adopted? Will it help win the 
war? 
Answer: Yes. the new plan was adopted to help win 
the war. In order to win the war. America needs all 
the trained minds she can get in many different kinds 
of work. Our country must be supplied with these 
skilled services as quickly as possible. Consequently, 
the total facilities of the University must at all times 
be fully utilized in preparing young citizens to make 
their needed contributions in the national war effort. 
College students who are preparing themselves for 
needed tvpes of services are definitely enlisted in the 
service of their country. 

How long will it take to complete the usual four-year 
course for the B.A. or B.S. degree under the new 
"three-year" plan? 
Answer: Although it is called the "three-year" plan, 
the new program actuallv makes it possible for stu- 
dents to earn their diploma in 2 years and 8 months. 
Thus a student who entered the University not later 
than 4 months after his 17th birthday would gradu- 
ate from college just prior to age 20. 

If a young man takes the new three-year course, will he 
be exempted from the draft until he graduates 
from college? 
Answer: Paradoxically, the answer is both "no" and 
"yes" so long as the present draft law remains un- 
changed. The answer is "no" in that all young men 
must register for the draft at age 20 regardless of 
whether they be in college, factory, office, or unem- 
ployed. The answer is "yes" in the case of those col- 
lege men who are pursuing certain professions which 
draft boards regard as grounds for deferment. In quite 
another sense, the answer is also "yes" for all who 
begin the new thrcc-ycar course not later than a few 
months following the 17th birthday. These men 
would graduate within a few months following age 
20, just prior to the time they could be taken by the 
draft. The policy of the University is to grant degrees 



£tiA&e+ti<i 



to men who are drafted in the second semester of the 
senior year. For further information address the Di- 
rector of Admission. Universitv of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. 

• • • 

Mr. Shaughnessy Will Speak 
At "M" Club Sprins Party 

When the "M" Club bovs and some prospective stu- 
dents get together on May 8 at College Park, they will 
hear Mr. Clark Shaughnessv talk on the Athletic and 
Physical Education Program. In addition, moving pic- 
tures of the campus activities, athletic games and out- 
standing football plavs will be shown. 

The gathering will start with a buffet supper in the 
University Dining Hall at 6:30 o'clock at a cost of SI. 25 
per person. Reservations in advance will greatly help the 
committee on arrangements. Write Dr. E. W. Cory. 



NEW ARMORY UNDER WAY 

Work has started on the New Armorv which is to be 
located just in the rear of the Administration Building 
facing the boulevard. The rapidly expanding R. O. T. C. 
training program drastically needs the building. Present 
plans call for completion by the Fall of this year so as 
not to impede the winter training schedule. 



George F. (Rosy) Pollock, business assistant in ath- 
letics, freshman baseball coach and Alumni secretary at 
Maryland, is entering the Army as a first lieutenant. He 
earned his R. O. T. C. commission back in the '20's 
when he was starring in baseball and football for the 
Terps. Recently he had been serving as captain in the 
home guards. 

— o— 

Maryland's ball team has rescheduled the trip to Lex- 
ington, Va., that was rained out earlier this month, 
listing V. M. I. May 11 and Washington and Lee the 
next day. 

— o— 

Jack Wright, Maryland soph pitcher, who broke 
Mankind's losing streak last Friday by easily beating 
West Virginia, reallv has just begun to develop. All he 
had last year as frosh was willingness and a powerful but 
uncontrollable right arm. In one game as a yearling he 
gave six bases on balls in a row. He's an exceptional 
fielder any place he is used. Wright was all-State full- 
back last fall. 



FELLOW ALUMNI: 

(Continued from page 2) 
and tell them of your prospects and your attendance al 

this meeting. 

The highlight of all will be the fiftieth anniversarj 
of the founding of the Alumni Association on Maj 
29th and the week of Graduation. Embrace even oppor 

tnnitv to attend these Man land functions and revive 
the old Man land Spirit. Tins year's meeting, the Cold 
en Anniversary, is the meeting of a lifetime. None oi 
us ever have more than one Golden Anniversarj so 
let none of us miss it. 

We extend welcome greetings to our new member 
of the faculty and football coach. Clark Shaughnessy. 
Welcome to Man land and may your work and friend 
ships here be both long and lasting. He wants to know- 
as many of us as possible and surely we all want to wel- 
come him — hence another incentive to come back in 
large numbers at one or more of the three meetings 
mentioned above. 

We all hope and feel that this fiftieth anniversary is 
to be the beginning of a new era for Maryland. Our 
good friend and energetic President — Curlcy — has. by 
his untiring efforts, given us a plant and faculty of 
which we may all be proud and it behooves even,- Mary- 
land Alumnus to see to it we do our share in selling 
Marvland to the young people of our whole country. 
We have something here for them — as good as can be 
had anvwhere else — so let us not be slow to tell and 
show them of the opportunities presented at University 
of Maryland, that so. when the students and Alumni 
gather for that second fiftieth vear the brilliance of the 
accomplishments of the Alumni of Maryland will not be 
shadowed by that of any institutions. 
Sincerelv vours. 

A. A. Parker, '05, 

President. 



Ray Grelecki. outhome, and Milt VandenBerg, first 
attack, are setting the scoring pace for the Maryland la- 
crosse team with 14 goals each in five games. Both played 
for City College of Baltimore in their high school days. 

— o— 

All of Maryland's ace grid ends will shift from track 
to Spring football practice. They are Bob James and 
Luther Conrad, 1941 regulars, and Jack Gilmore. who 
was going great guns when he was put out early in the 
season through an injury in the Duke game. James is a 
hurdler and javelin thrower; Conrad tosses the discus 
and shot, and Gilmore is Southern Conference high 
jump champ. James was a double winner against \\ ll 
liam and Mary last week and the three of them totalled 
18 points. 




A FORMER MAY DAY QUEEN 



Annual May 2)ay an Afay 4 

On Monday, May 4. at 4 P. M.. weather permitting, the annual 
crowning of the Queen of the May will be held on the campus green. 
This is one of the most colorful Spring events and always draws quite 
a throng. Above is a picture of a few years ago. 



Stewardess For Air Lines 

Mr. Donald Magarrel. director of passenger service 
for United Air Lines, announces waiving of registered 
nurse requirements for the duration: 

"Study hard, girls — especially such subjects as speech. 
English, hvgiene, phvsiologv, sociologv and home eco- 
nomics. We'll require at least two vears of college or 
university training, but we're making no change as to 
physical specifications which call for applicants to be 
between 5 feet 2 and 5 feet 5 inches tall, not over 120 
pounds in weight, and between 21 and 25 years of age." 



Eddie Rommel, son of the former pitching great for 
the Philadelphia Athletics and now an American League 
umpire, is playing third base on the Mankind freshman 
nine. He appears a good prospect and hit well in his 



first two games. 



— o— 



Florida — Elmer L. Mayer, '>(■>. now is in Florida for the ! 
Department of Agriculture .is Junior Entomologist and is st.itioncd 
.it Sanford. He married Miss Margaret Kremkaw. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 






Program For Field Day 
Unusually Attractive 

An unusually attractive program has been 
arranged for Man land's annual Field Day, 
Saturday, May 2. It will be the twenty- 
fifth meet, although the affair was inau- 
gurated in 1911. The only lapse in recent 
years was in 1929 when the steel stands on 
the East side of Byrd Stadium were being 
built. 

As usual, the feature of the affair is the 
interscholastic meet, with 13 open events 
and seven closed to the county high schools 
of the State, but these competitions are 
supported by four luring varsity events, as 
follows: 

Noon — Track: Maryland vs. Duke, with 
the interscholastics being run con- 
currently. 

2:30 — Baseball: Maryland vs. Washing- 
ton College. 

3:00 — Tennis: Maryland vs. North Car- 
olina. 

4:00 — Lacrosse: Maryland vs. Princeton. 

The Terp teams will have their hands 
full and an even break would be quite a 
feat. North Carolina and Duke will be hot 
favorites in the tennis and track meets and 
Mankind will rate no better than 50-50 in 
the lacrosse and baseball games. 

Last year Princeton was beaten, 6 — 5, in 
overtime, and Washington College was 
nosed out, 12 — 11. 

North Carolina, year in and year out, 
has about the best college tennis team in 
the country and the Duke track squad has 
unusual strength this season. 



BASEBALL SQUAD LIKELY 
TO HOLD DRESS PARADE 

Maryland's diamond squad hardly knows 
whether to play ball or go on dress parade 
this season. 

It has three of the five lieutenant colo- 
nels of the R. O. T. C. on the roster 
in Bob Smith, pitcher; Louis Tiemey, 
catcher, and Jim Wharton, second sackcr. 



VARSITY RESULTS 



Maryland 11 

Maryland 

Maryland 

Maryland 5 

Maryland 3 

Maryland 5 

Maryland 1 

Maryland 9 

Maryland 7 

Maryland 3 

Maryland 8 

Maryland 11 



Maryland 15 
Maryland 18 
Maryland 13 
Maryland 12 
Maryland 7 
Maryland 3 



BASEBALL 

Richmond U. 15 

North Carolina 6 

North Carolina 7 

Duke 8 

Duke 5 

Virginia 16 

Michigan 13 

West Virginia 2 

George Washington 5 

Navy 4 (11 innings) 

North Carolina 7 (10 in'gs) 

V. M. I. 9 



LACROSSE 

Harvard 2 

Loyola 5 

Baltimore A. C. 

Duke 1 

Army 5 

Mt. Washington 5 



1 



TRACK 

Maryland 63; Virginia Tech 63 
Maryland 47' 2 ; V. M. I. 77V2 
Maryland 92' 2 ; William and Mary 33> 2 



Maryland 2 
Maryland 9 
Maryland 9 



TENNIS 

Navy 7 
Richmond 
Catholic U. 



FUTURE CONTESTS 



BASEBALL 

May 1 — Richmond U. 

May 2 — Washington College 

May 4 — Virginia Tech 

May 8 — Washington and Lee 

May 9 — Georgetown 

May 11 — V. M. I. at Lexington 

May 12 — W. and L. at Lexington 

May 16 — Geo. Washington at Washington 

May 20 — Georgetown at Washington 



LACROSSE 

April 29— Penn State at State College 
May 2 — Princeton 
May 9 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 
May 20 — Hopkins at Baltimore (Night) 



TRACK 

May 2— Duke 
May 4 — Virginia 
May 9 — Army 



TENNIS 

April 29 — Georgetown 

April 30— Duke 

May 2 — North Carolina 

May 4 — Hopkins 

May 8 — Geo. Washington at Washington 

May 14 — Virginia at Charlottesville 

May 16 — Georgetown at Washington 



SHAUGHNESSY STARTS WORK 

Clark Shaughnessy, new physical fitness 
boss, athletic director and football coach, 
has begun "T" time at Maryland with 
close to 100 grid aspirants toiling in Spring 
drills, lie lias made a fine impression on 
everyone. 



Grid Aces Bis Factors 
On Spring Outfits 



Eleven football players who are ex- 
pected to be conspicuous for Maryland next 
Fall under Clark Sbaughnessy are impor- 
tant cogs on varsity Spring sports teams. 

Baseball has Jack Wright and Joe Hoop- 
engardncr, pitchers, and Jack Brenner, 
catcher. All are football backs. 

Lacrosse is bolstered greatly by Jack 
Dittmar, defense man, and Bill Taylor, 
midfielder. Dittmar shone as a grid tackle 
last Fall and Taylor was a reserve center. 
Tom Mont, a football back, also is de- 
veloping rapidly as a stickman. 

Track probably is aided most of all by 
gridmen. Among them are Jack Gilmore, 
Southern Conference high jump cham- 
pion; Luther Conrad, shot and discus; 
Louis Chacos, 440; Bob James, hur- 
dler and javelin thrower, and Jack Micr, 
shot putter and broad jumper. Gilmore, 
Conrad, and James all are outstanding ends 
on the gridiron and Chacos and Mier are 
capable backs. 

• 

Lacrosse Dependables 
Start From Scratch 

Bob Fetters and Ralph Burlin, regular 
defense men; Landis Hill, John Hoyert 
and Bemic Ulman, midfielders, and Bar- 
nett Broughton, reserve goalie, important 
members of the Maryland lacrosse squad, 
learned all their stick skill at College Park. 
All are Marylanders, except Hill, Ulman 
and Fetters being from Baltimore. 

Ulman is a senior playing his first sea- 
son and Broughton and Hoyert are sophs, 
the last named being a second-stringer for 
the frosh last year. Ulman and Hoyert di- 
vide the second defense post. Hill is a 
senior lettcrman. 

Tom Mont, from Cumberland, develop- 
ing rapidly as a midfielder, is another to 
whom the game was Greek until last sea- 
son with the yearlings. 






Four Vets, Three Rooks 
Carry Tennis Burden 

Four lettermen and three newcomers 
to the varsity squad arc carrj lnu Maryland's 

tennis hopes tins season, 

Doyle Royal and Griff Baugher, seniors, 
and Elwood Bates and Slater Clarke, jun 
iors. arc the lettermen. Julian Kerpen, a 
junior who did not come out List yeai 
after playing for the l'Mtl frosh, and Leon 
Strauss and Eli Gottlieb, sophs, complete 
the squad. 

Two hard blows hit the team with the 
best freshman player at Maryland in years 
not returning for scholastic reasons and 
another strong performer, who is in school, 
being ineligible on a like count. 



ENGLAR, OF TRACK TEAM, 
VERSATILE PERFORMER 

Carlos Englar, Maryland soph pole 
vaulter and high jumper, won the indoor 
decathlon held by the Physical Education 
Department. 

Bob Fetters, basket ball, lacrosse and 
soeeer player, was second and Jack Mier. 
football halfback and track man. w is 
third. Events in the test are shot put, rope 
climb, standing broad jump, standing high 
jump, hop. skip and jump, jump and 
touch, chinning. 40-yard dash, basket ball 
foul shooting and baskets per minute. 

Englar and Fetters are Baltimoreans. 



EIGHT ON DIAMOND SQUAD 
NOT OUT LAST SEASON 

There is an unusual angle to the Mary- 
land baseball squad in that eight of its 
members are players who were in school 
last year but did not perform either as 
frosh or varsity candidates. 

Among them are Clark Iludak. regular 
shortstop; Hartley Crist, one of the lead 
ing pitchers, and Dick Cleveland, starting 
right fielder. Others who are reserves are 
Bob Webster and Merrell Grafton, pitch 
crs; Louis Ticrncy. catcher, and Jim Kins 
man and Bill Ellett, infielders or out- 
fielders. 

Ticrncy and Kinsman arc strong bidders 
for regular jobs. 




CHARLES HECKERT HORN 

Sophomore discus tosser who his tilted the Maryland record to 1 50 feet, _1 : inches 
and who doubtless will add man) feel before long, lie also is a shot puttei oi marked 
ability. He's 6 feet, 3 inches and scales 220 pounds. He won Ins lcttei at basket ball this 
past season. 



SHOULD PLAY AT 4 P. M. 
When Clark Shaughnessy I ikes lus 
Maryland football team to Charlottesville 



GRELECKJ IS POLITICIAN 

K i\ Grelecki ol Baltimore, one of the 
icn in Marvl md's tl i^ln 1 k rossc 



next Fall to plaj Frank Murray's Virginia attack, has been elected president of the 
eleven, action should be started al 4 Student Governmcnl Association lie's an 

o'clock, as both will serve "T." honoi student, too. 




MMmcoiw 



m 



JOAN BENNETT in litr 

American Women's Voluntary 

Services uniform 

* 

Starring in Edit: Small's United Artists 

Production "Tain Beds'' 



His Cigarette 
and Aline 




Yours tOO for a full share of Mildness 
Better Taste and Cooler Smoking... that's what you 
and all other cigarette smokers are looking for... 
and you get it in Chesterfield's Right Combination 
of the world's best cigarette tobaccos. 

Make your next pack Chesterfields . . . regardless 
of price there is no better cigarette made today. 

EVERYWHERE YOU GO 



20j 



Ify&fcfa 



Ir Ste 'field 




te56 



ALUMNI 
NEWS 



MAY, 1942 




Commencement Week Program— University of Mary Ian 

MAY 24 TO MAY 30, 1942 



id 



BALTIMORE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
THURSDAY, MAY 28 — 

9:00 A.M. — Medical Alumni Association Registration, Stu- 
dents' Lounge, first floor; Gray Laboratory. 
10:00 A.M. — Inspection of University Hospital and Medical 
School. 

1:00 P.M. — Luncheon and annual meeting of the Medi- 
cal Alumni Association, Nurses' Dining Room, 
University Hospital. 

7:00 P.M.— Annual Banquet, Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

FRIDAY, MAY 29 — 

8:00 P.M. — Pre Commencement Exercises, Lyric Theatre. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
THURSDAY, MAY 28 — 

12:30 P.M. — Bridge — Luncheon for ladies. 
1:30 P.M. — Golf Tournament, Rolling Road Country 

Club. 
7:00 P.M. — Senior Class Banquet and Dance, Emerson 

Hotel. 
7:00 P.M. — Class Reunion Dinner. 

FRIDAY, MAY 29 — 

9:00 A.M. — -Senior Prize Contests, Dental Clinic. 
12:00 — Annual Business Meeting, National Alumni 

Association, Dental School Building. 
1 : ()() P.M.— Senior Class Assembly, Dental School Bldg. 
1:30P.M. — Luncheon, University Hospital Dining Hall. 
7:00 P.M. — Annual Alumni Banquet and Dance, Lord 

Baltimore Hotel. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

MONDAY, MAY 25 — 

8:00 P.M.- 2:00 A.M.— Senior Banquet and Prom, 
L'Hirondellc Club of Ruxton. 

\\ EDNESDAY, MAY 27 — 

6:30 P.M. — Annual meeting of the Alumni Association, 

Maryland Casualty Club House. 
7:00 P.M. — Annual Banquet of the Alumni Association, 

Maryland Casualty Club House. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 
MONDAY, MAY 25 — 

7:00 P.M. — Senior Dinner and Cap Stringing. 
FRIDAY, MAY 29 — 

10:00 A.M. — Corporate Communion at Old St. Paul's 

Church, Charles and Saratoga Streets. 
8:00 P.M. — Alumnae Banquet and Dance, Emerson Hotel. 



COLLEGE PARK 

SUNDAY. MAY 24 — 

11:00 A.M. — Baccalaureate Exercises. St. Andrew's Church. 

College Park. 
'Mill A.M. — Dean of Women's Breakfast for Senior Wo- 
men, University Dining Hall. 
4:00 - 6:00 P.M. — Dean's Tea for Home Economics 
Seniors. 

TUESDAY, MAY 26 — 

4:00 P.M.— Senior Class Picnic. Grcenbelt. In case of 
rain, Women's Eield House. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27 — 

7:00 P.M. — Senior Class Banquet, University Dining Hall. 
9:00 P.M. - 1:00 A.M.— Junior-Senior Ball, Gymnasium- 
Armory. 

THURSDAY, MAY 28 — 

3:30 P.M. — Honors and Awards Assembly. Women's Field 
House. 

9:00 P.M.- 1:00 A.M.— Rossborough Dance, Gymnasium- 
Armory. 

FRIDAY, MAY 29 — 

8:00 P.M.— Class Day Exercises. 

9:30 P.M. — Commencement Ball, Gymnasium-Armory. 
Alumni welcome. 

The Alumni should obtain tickets for the 
Commencement Ball from Mr. Frank K. 
Haszard, Secretary to President Byrd. Either 
write Mr. Haszard for the tickets or sec him 
in person on May 29th. 

SATURDAY, MAY 30 — 

9:00 A.M. — Alumni Registration begins in lobby of Ad- 
ministration Building. 
9:30 A.M. — Alumni meeting, second floor of Administra- 
tion Building. 
11:00 A.M. — Graduation Exercises in Coliseum. All Alumni 

arc invited. 
12:30 P.M. — Luncheon may be procured by all Alumni and 
members of their party in the cafeteria of the 
University Dining Hall. 
3:00 P.M. — Regulation football game to wind up Spring 
practice. 

ALL COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 
SATURDAY, MAY 30 — 

11:00 A.M. — Commencement Exercises for Baltimore and 
College Park Classes. Ritchie Coliseum, Col- 
lege Park. 

R. O. T. C. Commissions will be awarded at 
the Commencement Exercises. 




Volume XIII 



MARYLAND \LUMNI NEWS, MAY, 19-42 






Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 
OFFICERS FOR 1941-42 

Dr. A. A. Parker, '05, President 
Pocomokc City, Mil. 

Robert M. Watkins, '23, First Vice-President Calvert Hills, Mil. 

Austin C. Dices, '21, Second Vice-President Baltimore, Mil. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Mil. 

ALUMNI BOARD 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Chairman 

Edwin Semler, '23; Mrs. Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29 Arts and Science 

J. A. Bromley, '17; J. P. Shaefer, '28 Engineering 

M. B. Stevens, '28; J. C. Longridge, '29 Education 

J. M. Lescure, '23; K E. Smith, '16 Agriculture 

Miss Gertrude Chesnut, '26; Miss Martha Ross Temple, '31 Home Economics 

Elwood Armstrong, '26; Jerome Hardy, '39 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Omar Crothers, Jr., '29; C. V. Koons, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '32; Miss May Louise Wood, '28. . . .Women's Representatives 
P. W. Chichester, '20 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 
Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Association 
at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 
. Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, 

'34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
DORCHESTER COUNTY: James E. Andrews, Jr., '31, President; Charles E. Edmondson, '36, 

Secretary, Cambridge, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Ransom R. Lewis, '19, President; Richard E. Zimmerman, '37, '40, 

Secretary, Frederick, Md. 
GARRETT COUNTY — Dr. E. I. Baumgartner, '27, President; Mrs. Katherine Stevenson Helbig, 

'32, Secretary, Oakland, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue N.W.; Charles 

V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr.. '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 
WICOMICO COUNTY: Mr. Charles E. Hearne, '30, President; Miss Bettie Harcum, '38, Sec- 
retary, Salisbury, Md. 



James W. Stevens, 


"M - 

'19 


CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

President Dr. Ernest N. Cory, '09... 


...Secretary-Treasurer 


Myron B. Stevens, 


'27 


Vice-President Edwin E. Powell, '13 


Historian 











COVER PICTURE 

One of tin most attractive and inviting 
plat es mi tin ( tmpus is th< r< 1 1 ntl) re 
stored Rossborough Inn which, history 
tells us. housed man) <>f tin Nation's 
great in the early da\s oi the Republic. 

\ltiiniu will find this .i cool and restful 

spot to meet old friends and view the col 
orfnl pageant of Commencement. 

The view on the front cova was taken 

In David Johnson, '41, whose .irtistn .md 
outstanding photography was largely re 
sponsible for the fact that the University 
student annual, the Terrapin, was awarded 
All-American honors last year. This view 
shows the garden wall from the hast. 



W. M. KlSHPAUGH, '17 

Eddie Semler, '23 _ 

Tilghman B. Marden, '25.. 

H. B. Shipley, '14 

Seymour W. Ruff. '17 

Egbert Tingley, '27 

Talbot T. Speer, '17 



SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES: 

Football Fran k Hawk ins, '34 Boxing 

Baseball Dr. Huckey Clemson, D.D.S., '21 

.Lacrosse James M. Swartz, '19 

.Basket Ball Jerre H. Sullivan, '21 At Large 

Track Dr. A. W. Valentine, M.D. '04 

_ Tennis Lee Pennington '15 

Cross Country G. F. Pollock, '23 _ _ 



Pollock, In Army, Sadly 
Missed At University 

George Findlay i Rosey I Pollock. '23, 
Alumni secretary, :issist.int in athletics, 
freshman baseball coach, and popular and 
efficient "jack of all trades." is being sadly 

missed on the campus. 

Rosey has gone into the Army with the 

rank of first lieutenant and certainly will 
do an excellent job for Uncle Sam as he- 
has done for his \hiu Mater, lie will he- 
hard to replaee at the University, as when 
there was something extra to he done, pai 
ticularly of a trying nature, it always was 
"let Rosy do it." 

Rosy was a real athlete in his d.i\ . al 
though lie weighed only 153 pounds when 
he was starring at center on the foothall 
team and at first base and m the outfield 
in baseball. In fact, he had and still has 
"what it takes." 

Mrs. Pollock and their three children 
will continue to reside m College Heights. 
near the University. — W. II. H. 



Alumni (lewUost QUxmc^ed *7a May 30 



WILL INCLUDE DANCE, MEETING, COM- 
MENCEMENT AND FOOTBALL GAME 



Unavoidable circumstances apparently necessitate a 
change in the Alumni program for Commencement 
Week, and Alumni Day will be held on Saturday, May 
30, instead of May 29, as had been previously an- 
nounced, according to Dr. H. C. Bvrd, President of the 
University. 

Rosey In Army 

The change in program was largely made necessary 
by the fact that Rosey Pollock, Secretary of the Alumni 
Association, has been called into active duty as an ad- 
ministrative officer of one of the base hospital units pro- 
vided by the University of Maryland Medical School, 
and because it would be difficult to have a large reunion 
with so many of the Alumni on Government and mili- 
tary service missions of one kind or another. 

In addition, Dr. A. A. Parker, President of the Alumni 
Association, has been compelled to take a long rest due 
to a heart condition and it will very likely be impos- 
sible for him to be present on Alumni Day. President 
Byrd talked with Dr. Parker recently on three occasions 
and learned that he is coming around in great shape and 
expects to be back handling his practice again in the 
near future. 

Reunion Postponed 

After discussing the situation with several prominent 
Alumni, including President Parker and Vice-President 
Watkins, University officials have decided to postpone 
plans for a large anniversary reunion and to change the 
general schedule of events. 

The new plans for Alumni Day include an invitation 
to the Commencement Ball which will be held in the 
Gymnasium-Armory on Friday night from 9 P. M. to 
1 A. M. The Alumni should obtain tickets for the Com- 
mencement Ball from Mr. Frank K. Haszard, Secretary 
to President Byrd. Either write Mr. Haszard for the 
tickets or see him in person on May 29th. 

Registration will take place on Saturday morning 
at 9 o'clock in the new Administration Building and 
the annual meeting will begin at 9:30 A. M. Follow- 
ing the meeting the Alumni are invited to attend gradu- 
ation exercises in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. More than 
800 graduates will receive their diplomas this year and 
it is felt Alumni will enjoy seeing this thrilling and col- 
orful event. 

Football Game 

At 3 o'clock a football game will be held between two 



picked squads which have been coached this Spring bv 
Clark Shaughnessy, the new Director of Athletics and 
football coach at the University. This will be the first 
time that Alumni have had an opportunity to meet Mr. 
Shaughnessy and to see the new system to be employed 
by Maryland football teams. An admission fee of 50 
cents will be charged for the game — all receipts from 
which will be used for the purchase of athletic equip- 
ment to help carry on the training program for the R. 
O. T. C. Regiment at the University. 

University officials feel that under present conditions 
such a program as this will provide a much more prac- 
tical and satisfactory day for returning Alumni than if 
an attempt had been made to carry out the original 
Friday program. 



Bombing OF Singapore Described 
By Preston L. Peach, '03 

When the big bombs dropped in Raffles Square, 
Singapore, in the still morning hours of December 8, 
and the Japanese gave warning that war was on, I was 
in the city and went through all the initial experiences 
of the opening of the war of the Southwest Pacific. Now, 
I am writing this at Mitchellville, amid the peaceful 
beauty of a glorious Spring day in Maryland, but as I 
travel back in time to that day in December I find my- 
self in a bad dream— a nightmare. Then I read the dailv 
newspaper and listen to the radio and I find it is true. 
only too true. 

Saved By Smoke Pall 

Until the very day before we left Singapore with 
twenty other American missionaries and forty-five 
American business and professional men and women, 
we did not believe that fortress would fall. But when, 
two days later, on January 30, we actually left the harbor 
amid burning warehouses, rubber and coal and ex- 
ploding bombs, we began to feel that the city would fall. 
Our ship was saved by a great pall of black smoke which 
was over the entire harbor. 

As deck passengers on that American freighter we 
crossed the Java Sea to the north coast of Java. We wore 
life belts continually and had a blackout every night. 

On they came and Singapore surrendered. Java and 
Sumatra went into the fight at once. We left Java from 
the south coast on February 22. Up to that time we had 
(Continued on page 6) 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL 



Shaughnessy And T Football Make Tremendous Hit 
As New Grid Style Dominates Toil At College Park 



Athletics arc being run pretty much on 
" T tunc" at College Park now. In fact, 
Spring football practice, which dominates 
the situation, starts each day at 4 o'clock. 
Different varieties of "T" are served but 
none of it is "pink." 

Clark Shaughnessy, the new athletic boss 
and grid coach, who has made a fine im- 
pression on everyone as a man as well as 
a mentor, ami his assistants keep the boss 
moving at a fast gait despite the fact that 
there are close to 100 on the field. This 
is double the number usually out for 
Spring work and bespeaks the enthusiasm 
that Shaughnessy has stirred up on the 
campus. All get the same minute attention. 
Will Carry All Aspirants 

Of course, this does not mean that the 
new coach has a greatly increased amount 
of real football material and the Terps who 
made up the varsity and frosh squads list 
season doubtless will do most of the play 
ing next Fall. Several, however, may come 
out of the enthused newcomers and all 
will get the benefit that football brings. 
Shaughnessy does not intend to cut a single 
man from the squad. 

In addition to Jack Faber, Al Heagy and 
Al Woods, who made up Maryland's foot- 
ball coaching staff for the past two years. 
Bob Snyder and Sid Luckman, quarter- 
backs, and Joe Stydahar. tackle, of the 
professional champion Chicago (T) Bears, 
have been on the job. Snyder and Styda- 
har will serve through the entire Spring 
session but Luckman helped only one 
week-end. 

Practice was started on April 20 and will 
end with an intra-squad game May 30. 

All Of Squads Contribute 

Usually, of course. Spring football prac 
tice is over before the regular season in 
sports begins; but this year, owing to the 
coaching change, lacrosse, baseball and 
track all had to suffer by giving some of 
their best men over to the grid drills. In 



lacrosse it also meant the loss of Fabei 
lor nearly two weeks and Heagy tor the 
rest of the season after April Z i ' Trackmen 
and stickmen were made available for then 
contests but, naturally, were not fully tuned 
for their tasks. 

Maryland's gridder, old and new. are 
sold on the "T." find that it does not 
entail drudgery of the hard blocking type 
of game, are stirred by its offensive possi 

bihties and are getting real fun out of the 
practice sessions. 

Testing Stage Is Reached 

When this was written, Shaughnessy was 
getting his big crew to the point where 
battles between the various teams were to 
be the order. He equipped six elevens for 
such action. 

So far Duke Alexander, soph end, and 
Harold Bern-, junior guard, both of whom 
have gone into the Marines, have been the 
only letter men to be lost. Several of the 
1941 yearlings are gone for one reason or 
another but it appears now as if close to 
45 from these last two year's squads would 
be around in the Fall. 

At any rate, even if some others are lost, 

Shaughnessy will not cry over his material, 

and it is a safe bet that he'll have an 

outfit that will be hard for any foe to lick. 

• 

Boothe Highly Praised 
For Ail-Around Skill 

Dan Boothe. Maryland centerfielder, is 
rated the best gardener he ever has 
coached by Burt Shipley for his ground 
covering, throwing and base running 
ability. 

Boothe, who is a junior, also is doing 
his bit with the bat, hitting over .300. 
• 
GRAHAM GOOD MENTOR 

Bill Graham, varsity defense man in 
1941 and two preceding years, did a fine 
job of coaching the I'erp frosh lacrosse- 
men. 



Spring Athletic Outfits 

Having 50-50 Season 

Maryland's varsity Spun 
were having .1 sii in season with competi 
tion nearing i ( lose. 

The lacrosse team had lost on! 

game, a 12 In thrfllei to Prini eton, but 
thai apparent!; cost the national title; the 

track squad was in the led. the ball club 
was in a position where it couldn't br< ik 
even on the season, and the tennis outfit 
was sure to be on the right side of the 
ledger. 

The big affairs left on the schedule are 
the lacrosse game with Hopkins on Home 
wood Field in Baltimore at ^JM V M. on 
May 20 and the ball game with Geo 
town in Washington that afternoon. 

Maryland can assure itself at least a run 
ner-up position in the lacrosse race In- 
halting the Blue Jays. 
• 

Champion Terp Boxers 
Also Good Students 

Maryland's Fastern Intercollegiate box 
ing tourney champions are proving they 
can "hit the books" as well as their ring 
rivals. 

Scholastic figures on the College Park 
squad, not including Len Rodman, heavy, 
who is a Pharmacy School student in Bal- 
timore, shows the team members have an 
average of 2.581 out of a possible four 
points. This is considerably above the gen- 
eral average of the student body. 

Judson Lincoln. Hotsj Alperstein and 
Jack Gilmore, three of the regulars, boasted 
three point averages or better for the past 
semester. 

• 

BROUGHTON IS LEADER 
Barnett Broughton, reserve goalie on the 
varsity lacrosse team, his been elected prcs 
ident of the next Junior Class. He served 
as frosh prexy and now is completing his 
term as head of the sophs. 



Annual Military Day Provides 
Thrills For Visitors 

in unexpected highlight to the annual Military Day exercises 
this year, the Military Department at the University announced 
that Luther Conrad, of Hollidaysburg, Pa., had been chosen as 
Colonel of the Maryland Regiment for the coming two semesters. 

This announcement came just after the regimental competition 
and w.is a complete surprise, as the colonel is normally appointed 
at the beginning of the new school year. Young Conrad, a 
junior in Education, football and track star, and a member of 
Alpha Tau Omega social fraternity, did not know of his appoint- 
ment until just prior to the announcement. His parents had been 
notified, however, and were present to congratulate him on his 
new honor. 

Company K Wins 

Company K. captained by Ted Vial, of Hyattsville, captured the 
company competition, winning by a close margin over Companies 
M and I. Incidentally. Company I, commanded by Captain Jerry 
Prentice, of University Park, had led in the competition through- 
out the year, although it was nosed out by Company K through 
its superior drill. 

Lieutenant Robert Condon, of Baltimore, carried his third 
platoon of Company L to victory in the platoon competition. 

Thirty-six candidates faced the blistering sun in the individual 
competition for the best drilled soldier. A freshman daydodger, 
James LaCroix, Jr., of Washington, won this contest, but was 
closely trailed by sophomores Douglas Hope, of St. Michael, and 
W . C. Pennington, of Che\y Chase. 

Dr. Byrd Presents Awards 

President Byrd presented the awards to the winners. Members 
of the University Rifle Team were awarded the second and third 
prizes in the William Randolph Hearst National R. O. T. C. Rifle 
Matches, and the Pershing Rifles Platoon, commanded by Robert 
Rivello, of Washington, received an award as the highest scoring 
P. R. Team in the country. This platoon also received an award for 
winning the drill team competition staged in New York late in 
April. 

Ulrich Geller, of Chevy Chase, and Stephen Early, Jr., son of 
President Roosevelt's secretary, received high scoring awards for 
the varsity and freshman rifle teams. 

Judges for the day included three Maryland Alumni: Major 
Geary Eppley, '18, chief of the judges; Captain W. J. Mc Williams, 
'38; and Lieutenant P. A. Pfeiffer, '37. 

High ranking military officers witnessed the exercises and a 
squad of military police gave demonstrations of riot control and 
Judo, the Americanized name for the Far Eastern Ju-Jitsu. Offi- 
cers from the Civilian Defense Air Warden School, meeting on 
the campus at the time, gave a demonstration of control of in- 
cendiary bombs. 

Bringing the exercises to a spectacular conclusion, juniors and 
members of Pershing Rifles staged a sham battle which included 
trench mortars, land mines, a smoke screen, blank cartridges, 
grenades, and two dive-bombing Fairchild training planes which 
dropped harmless flour bombs to give a realistic appearance to 
the games. 



Air-Raid Wardens — Predecessor and successor as Air-Raid War- 
den for Prince George County was and is an Alumnus. Robert 
Forrest, '17, State Delegate to the Legislature, was formerly Chief 
Air Raid Warden for Prince George County and because of du- 
ties taking him out of the county, had to resign. His successor is 
none other than Emanuel Zalcsak, '25, former president of the 
.Minimi Association and now business man of College Park. 



Ruth Lee Thompson Named 
Maryland May Queen 

Under sunny skies and with a crowd of more than 1,000 parents 
and students in attendance. Miss Ruth Lee Thompson, of Cum- 
berland, was named May Queen for this year at exercises held on 
the campus on May 4. Five outstanding women members of the 
Junior Class were also tapped by Mortar Board during the 
ceremony. 

Miss Thompson has been extremely popular and active at the 
University, and this year was Women's Editor of the Terrapin, 
secretary of her class, vice-president of her sorority, and a member 
of Mortar Board, and of Phi Kappa Phi. 

Miss Thompson's court was composed of Kay Barker, Ruth 
Dashiell, Esther Handler, Edwina Hambleton, Jane Howard, 
Caroline McGill, Caroline Meng, Mary Frances Ryon, Elma 
Staley, Audrey Stewart, Bette Stone, and Louise Teller. 

Dances depicting the four seasons of the year were presented 
by members of the Junior Class, at the conclusion of which Miss 
Barbara Boose, of Chevy Chase, last year's May Queen, placed a 
floral crown on Miss Thompson's head. 



BOMBING OF SINGAPORE 

(Continued from page 4) 

been in over 100 raids in Knalo Lumpur, Singapore, Batavia. In 
passing let me say that aerial warfare and bombing is a terrifving 
thing in its first stages. Let no one take it lightly. 

We journeyed from Java to Australia again under blackout and 
with life belts on and arrived in Melbourne March 5. March 6 
was our wedding anniversary, but we forgot all about it. Do vou 
blame us? We felt much at home among the Australians, and 
especially when we saw our American soldiers. I wanted to shake 
hands with everyone I met. They are a wonderful group. They 
have found a great place in Australia's heart. 
16,000-Mile Journey 

We left in a U. S. transport on March 15, and by a devious 
route over the great Pacific, we landed in San Francisco on 
April 5. Then we went by train across the Nation to Washington 
where we ended a 16,000-mile journey. We are safe at home and 
among friends, but we live yet in the land of our adoption, 
Malaya, with its beauty, its opportunities of service to humanity, 
and its resources. 

It cannot, it must not remain for long in the hands of in- 
vaders and despoilers. It must be redeemed. It shall be. 



Chaplain — Rev. Walter P. Plumley, '29, formerly of Haddon 
Heights, N. J., now is Lieutenant Plumley, Chaplain, U. S. 
Army, with assignment unknown at the present. Walter and his 
family paid the campus a visit recentlv while enroute to his parents 
in Takoma Park. 



Ellicott City — Mr. and Mrs. E. Gordon Hammond now live 
at St. Johns Lane, Ellicott City, Maryland. Mrs. Hammond was 
formerly Miss Erma Elizabeth Bryne of Baltimore. Gordon be- 
longs to the Class of '34. 

ooo 

West Coast — Frank M. Heath, '33, is on the West Coast in 
Pasadena, California. He is expected in Oregon City in March. 
His mail is to be delivered to Box 33 3A, Oregon City, Oregon. 



ALUMNI DAY PROGRAM 

COLL E G E P A R K 



FRIDAY, MAY 29 

9:00P.M. — Commencement Ball -Gymnasium Armory. All Mumniare 
cordiallj united to attend. 

The Alumni should obtain tickets for the Commencement 
Ball from Mr. Frank K. Haszard, Secretary to President Byrd. 
Either write Mr. Haszard for the tiekets or see him in person 
on May 29th. 

SATURDAY, may^nqt CIRCULATE 

9:00 A.M. — Registration in the Lobby of the new Administration Building. 

9:30 A.M. — Meeting of Alumni on second floor of the Administration 
Building. A portrait of the late Thomas H. Spence, a beloved 
member of the faculty for many years, is being presented to the 
University by James Stevens and James Swartz, of the Class 
of 1912. Mrs. Spence will be present to receive the portrait for 
the University. 

1 1 : 00 A.M. — Graduation Exercises for Baltimore and College Park Schools 
in the Coliseum. Alumni will enjoy this very colorful event 
and are invited to be present. 

12:30 P.M. — Luncheon may be procured by all Alumni and members of 
their party in the cafeteria of the University Dining Hall. 

3:00 P.M. — Football game between picked squads that have been working 
under Clark Shaughnessy, our new football coach and director 
of athletics. A charge of fifty cents will be made and the pro- 
ceeds of the game will be used to defray expenses of additional 
equipment needed for the greatly expanded military program 
at the University. 



ADRIENiSE AMES, supervisor of canteen supplies for Bundles for Bluejackets, a division of "Bundles for America" uhich is supplying com- 
forts to the men of the armed forces of the United States. No bundle for a man in the service is complete without the cigarette that satisfies. 



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